Name a planet in our solar system

name a planet in our solar system

As of 2017, it depends on whether you count major planets only, Major planets plus dwarf planets, or all planets. The 8 major known planets in order from the Sun are: • Mercury • Venus • Earth • Mars • Jupiter • Saturn • Uranus • Neptune If you list ALL 13 known planets in order, including dwarf planets, they are: • Mercury • Venus • Earth • Mars • Ceres • Jupiter • Saturn • Uranus • Neptune • Pluto • Haumea • Makemake • Eris Dwarf planets also fall under the category of minor planets, of which there are thousands in our solar system.

As of 2017, the orbits of 734,274 minor planets were archived at the Name a planet in our solar system Planet Center, 496,815 of which had received permanent numbers. The largest minor planet that is not considered to be a dwarf planet is Sedna.

Names of the Planets • Mercury - named after the Roman mythological counterpart of Hermes, the Greek god of messengers, commerce, thieves, and sports. Named as such because of the speed at which it revolves around the Sun. • Venus - named after the Roman mythological counterpart of Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty. • Earth (also known by its Latin name, "Terra") - named after the titan of the Earth from Greek mythology.

• Mars - named after the Roman mythological counterpart of Ares, the Greek God of War. • Jupiter - named after the Roman mythological counterpart of Zeus, the Greek king of the gods. • Saturn - named after the Roman god of agriculture and harvest, Saturn. He is the Roman mythological counterpart of Cronus (Kronos), the Greek titan who fathered Zeus.

• Uranus - named after the Greek mythological Father of the Sky, Ouranos. "Uranus" is the Latin translation of "Ouranos". • Neptune - named after the Name a planet in our solar system mythological counterpart of Poseidon, the Greek god of the seas.

Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are all made primarily of gas and are very large. Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars are small and made of rock.

My Very eager Mother Just Served Us Noodles Pluto was considered a planet from 1930 to 2006, but was reclassified as a "dwarf planet", because many Pluto-like bodies were discovered in orbits past Neptune. The dwarf planets are Ceres, Pluto, Haumea, Eris, and Makemake. The names of our planets are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto. Pluto isn't really classified as a planet anymore, (which I hate) but it is now a Dwarf Planet. Another way to remember the planets names is to make a cool rhyme or little poem.

Like this one: My Very Eager Mother Just Sold Us Notebooks According to the 2006 definition by the IAU, there are 8 "planets" in our solar system: • Mercury • Venus • Earth • Mars • Jupiter • Saturn • Uranus • Neptune Furthermore, there are a number of large moons orbiting the gas giant planets, and there are several dwarf planets including the former "planet" Pluto (reclassified in 2006).

Many new candidates for the dwarf category have been found past the orbit of Neptune. venus, mercury, saturn, earth, mars,jupiter,uranus,neptune and the sun The planets in our solar system are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. In 2006 the IAU redefined planets and reclassified Pluto, demoting it from planet to minor or dwarf planet - so now we are considered to have only eight.

If there is a ninth, it would have to 1) be in hydrostatic equilibrium, 2) be in orbit around the sun, and 3) to have cleared its orbit. With the reclassification of the term "planet" in 2006, there are only eight planets in the solar system, and Pluto is considered a "dwarf planet". The remaining 8 planets are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. (see the related question) SUN 1. Mercury 2. Venus 3. Earth 4. Mars ASTEROID BELT 5.

Jupiter 6. Saturn 7. Uranus (pronounced "you're-on-us") 8. Neptune *Dwarf Planet: Pluto In order from the sun Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune (Pluto) name a planet in our solar system, venus, earth, mercury, jupiter, saturn, uranus, neptune Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune Mercury, Venus, Mars, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune.

Pluto used to be listed as the ninth planet, but has since been demoted to a Dwarf Planet [See Link]. • Mercury • Venus • Earth • Mars • Jupiter • Saturn • Uranus • Neptune • Pluto (no longer considered a planet) Also a way to remember that is: MVEMJSUNP = My Very Elegant Mom Just Served Us Nine Pizzas = Mercury, (and all the other planets) What are the 9 Planets of the Solar System?

Almost all of us have looked up into the sky and wondered what is there. Well, there are lots of fascinating objects revolving out of space.

Humans have left the earth in space ships to explore the solar system that surrounds it. It’s known as the solar system since everything in it revolves around the Sun and solar means the Sun. Eight known planets, the moon, as well as comets, asteroids and other space objects, revolve around the sun.

The Sun is the largest object in the solar system. In fact, it accounts for 99% of the solar systems’ mass. Astronomers estimate that the solar system is more than 4.5 billion years old. Here is a rundown on the 9 planets of the solar system: Table of Contents • 1. Mercury • 2. Venus • 3. Earth • 4. Mars • 5. Jupiter • 6. Saturn • 7. Uranus • 8.

name a planet in our solar system

Neptune • 9. Pluto 1. Mercury Mercury is the smallest planet in the solar system, approximately 3000 miles (4850 km) in diameter, hardly larger than the moon. Despite being the smallest, it’s extremely dense.

In fact, it’s the second densest planet after Earth. It’s also the closest planet to the sun, making it dangerous to explore. Mercury is 48 million miles from the earth.

name a planet in our solar system

Since it’s the nearest planet to the sun, surface temperatures can go up to a scorching 800 degrees Fahrenheit to a freezing -300 degrees below zero. Mercury orbits the sun every 88 days, faster than any planet, by far. It’s characterized by short year. Despite its short year, a single day on Mercury is equivalent to about 59 Earth days. Mercury is thought to be more than two-thirds metallic and a third silicon or rock. 2. Venus Venus is the second planet from the sun, and close to the earth, which is why it’s often referred to as our sister planet.

It’s similar size to the Earth, about 7300 miles (12,000 kilometers). It’s nicknamed ‘’the morning star,” and thought to be the most inhabitable planet. Surface temperatures of Venus approach 900 degrees Fahrenheit, hot enough to melt the surface of the earth.

Venus has a characteristic thick atmosphere, composed mainly of sulphuric acid and carbon dioxide. Humans could not breathe in Venus since the atmosphere would be severely toxic. In fact, Venus’ atmosphere has more acid per cubic centimeters than a car battery.

This atmosphere is the reason why Venus appears brownish-yellow. Venus rotates relatively slowly. It takes 243 days to make a complete turn.

Mercury and Venus are the only planets that do not have moons. 3. Earth Earth is a unique plant in the entire solar system because it teems with life, including millions of aquatic and terrestrial animal and plant species. It has active plate movement and humans also live on this planet. Earth’s core is almost entirely composed of iron. The inner core is solid, while the outer core is liquid. The next layer is called the mantle and is made up of rock, mostly viscous or semi-liquid state.

The surface is formed of a thin rocky crust. Earth is the 5th largest planet in the solar system (12,000 kilometers in diameter) and is thought to be 4.6 billion years old. The earth revolves around its axis every 24 hours and orbits the sun every 365 days (a year). The earth consists of one moon. 4. Mars It often called the red planet and nicknamed Roman god of war. Mars is a little bigger than the earth (about 6,790 kilometers in diameter). It has almost similar characteristics to earth such as mountain ranges, rolling plains, gigantic canyons, and volcanoes.

Mars takes 687 days to orbit once around the sun, and its rotation speed is equal to the earth’s (24.6hrs). The surface is mostly covered by iron-rich volcanic rock. The rock is sprinkled with iron oxide, which gives the planet its characteristic red tint. Mars has a relatively thin atmosphere, and consists of two small moons. 5. Jupiter Jupiter is the largest of all the planets in the solar systems (142,980 kilometers in diameter) and more than 11 times wider than Planet Earth.

Jupiter rotates around the sun once name a planet in our solar system 12 years. Despite its sheer size, Jupiter rotates on its axis pretty fast (in 9hrs and 19 min). Jupiter is made up of gas and liquid, and has no solid.

It’s 90% hydrogen and 10% helium, as well as traces of methane, water, and ammonia. This means that if you were to land name a planet in our solar system the surface, you would sink into it. Theoretical evidence stipulates that Jupiter‘s core is made up of metallic hydrogen and rock. The exterior gaseous part is split into bands of brown, red, yellow and white clouds.

Jupiter consists of four rings mainly made up of dust. The surface also experiences oval-shaped storms.

name a planet in our solar system

As of 2016, Jupiter encompasses 67 known satellites, plus the 4 large Galilean moons (Io, Europa, Callisto, and Ganymede), as wells as numerous small ones, which remain unnamed. 6. Saturn Saturn is the 6th planet away from the sun. It’s one of the largest and brightest planets, nine times the size of the earth (120,536 kilometers), and orbited by numerous objects. Saturn is recognizable by its system of three rings.

It orbits the sun in 12 years and rotates slightly name a planet in our solar system than 10 hours. Saturn has a relatively small and solid dense core, composed mainly of ice and rock. It’s surrounded by a layer of liquid metallic hydrogen. The exterior layer is composed of helium, molecular hydrogen and traces of water, methane, and ammonia. As opposed to other planets, Saturn has no definable surface. As an alternative, there is a slow transition from a gaseous atmosphere to liquid interiors.

Its core is extremely hot (21, 00 degrees Fahrenheit). In fact, Saturn is thought to radiate 2.5 times more energy than it receives from the sun. Its surface appears branded, and consists of a brown-yellow, butterscotch color. Saturn consists of 62 moons as of 2016 statistics. It’s nicknamed the Roman god of agriculture. 7. Uranus Uranus is the 7th planet from the sun. It’s the third-largest planet in the solar system, 4.4 times the size of planet earth (51,118 kilometers).

Uranus orbits the sun relatively slowly.

name a planet in our solar system

It takes 84 years to complete a single orbit, rotating on its axis much faster than the earth (17 hours). Uranus can be seen with the naked eye and has a characteristic blue color. Like Jupiter and Saturn, Uranus has no solid outer surface, which means the entire surface is made up of gases, with a fairly uniform blue-green color.

However, the core is solid and rocky, and since it’s too far from the sun, the core is surrounded by a mantle of ice, which is why this planet is referred to as an ice triad. As of 2016, Uranus has 27 moons and is wrapped around by a system of nine rings.

Uranium is nicknamed “grandfather of Jupiter.” 8. Neptune Neptune is a little smaller than Uranus, and 17 times bigger than earth. It has a measurement of 49, 500 kilometers in diameter.

Neptune is the 8th and furthest planet from the sun. It orbits the sun once each 165 years. It has almost similar structure and composition as Neptune, as its outer surface appears blue, and characterized by large dark blue storm systems.

A system of five rings surrounds Neptune and consists of 14 moons. It’s nicknamed the Roman god of the ocean. 9. Pluto Pluto is found 3.7 billion miles from the sun.

It’s half the size of the earth’s moon, which is why it was renamed dwarf planet. Pluto is composed of chiefly rock and ice. The surface is made up of almost completely frozen methane, nitrogen, and carbon monoxide. It orbits the sun in 28 years and rotates in a duration of 6.4 days. It’s composed of one large moon and nicknamed the Roman god of outer darkness.

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Names of all the Planets of the Solar System This page shows the names of all the planets and also the names of the currently known moons.

It also lists the names and locations of each Planet and Satellite discoverer (if known) and provides the meaning/derivation for each name. The planets are in order of the date of discovery. Planet and Satellite Names and Discoverers Mercury - Venus - Earth - Mars - Asteroids - Jupiter - Saturn - Uranus - Neptune - Dwarf Planets This page shows information about planetary bodies named by the IAU Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN), and about bodies named by the IAU Committee on Small Body Nomenclature that have surface features named by the WGPSN.

Mercury Body Description Date of Discovery Discovery Location Discoverer Mercury Named Mercurius by the Romans because it appears to move so swiftly. ? ? ? Venus Body Description Date of Discovery Discovery Location Discoverer Venus Roman name for the goddess of love. This planet was considered to be the brightest and most beautiful planet or star in the heavens.

Other civilizations have named it for their god or goddess of love/war. ? ? ? The Earth and its Moon Body Description Date of Discovery Discovery Location Discoverer Earth The name Earth comes from the Indo-European base 'er,'which produced the Germanic noun 'ertho,' and ultimately German 'erde,' Dutch 'aarde,' Scandinavian 'jord,' and English 'earth.' Related forms include Greek 'eraze,' meaning 'on the ground,' and Welsh 'erw,' meaning 'a piece of land.' ?

? ? Earth I (Moon) Every civilization has had a name for the satellite of Earth that is known, in English, as the Moon. The Moon is name a planet in our solar system as Luna in Italian, Latin, and Spanish, as Lune in French, as Mond in German, and as Selene in Greek.

? ? ? Mars and its Moons The names of the moons of Mars and the English translations of the names were specifically proposed by their discoverer, Asaph Hall, and as such, they have been accepted and retained under the current IAU nomenclature.

Body Description Date name a planet in our solar system Discovery Discovery Location Discoverer Mars Named by the Romans for their god of war because of its red, bloodlike color.

Other civilizations also named this planet from this attribute; for example, the Egyptians named it "Her Desher," meaning "the red one." ? ? ? Mars I (Phobos) Inner satellite of Mars. Named for one of the horses that drew Mars' chariot; also called an "attendant" or "son" of Mars, according to chapter 15, line 119 of Homer's "Iliad." This Greek word means "flight." August 17, 1877 Washington A.

Hall Mars II (Deimos) This outer Martian satellite was named for one of the horses that drew Mars' chariot; also called an "attendant" or "son" of Mars, according to chapter 15, line 119 of Homer's "Iliad." Deimos means "fear" in Greek. August 11, 1877 Washington A. Hall Selected Asteroids (of the Main Belt) and their Satellites Body Description Date of Discovery Discovery Location Discoverer (433) Eros Named for the Greek god of love. August 13, 1898 Berlin C.G.

Witt (951) Gaspra Named for a resort on the Crimean Peninsula.

name a planet in our solar system

July 30, 1916 Simeis G. Neujmin (243) Ida Named for a nymph who raised the infant Zeus. Ida is also the name of a mountain on the island of Crete, the location of the cave where Zeus was reared. September 29, 1884 Vienna J. Palisa (243) Ida I (Dactyl) Named for a group of mythological beings who lived on Mount Ida, where the infant Zeus was hidden and raised (according to some accounts) by the nymph Ida. August 28, 1993 Galileo imaging and infrared science teams. (253) Mathilde The name was suggested by a staff member of the Paris Observatory who first computed an orbit for Mathilde.

The name is thought to honor the wife of the vice director of the Paris Observatory at that time. November 12, 1885 Vienna J. Palisa (22) Kalliope I (Linus) Satellite of (22) Kalliope. In various accounts of Greek mythology, Linus is considered to be the son of the Muse Kalliope and the inventor of melody and rhythm.

August 29 and September 2, 2001 Mauna Kea J.-L. Margot, M.E. Brown, W.J. Merline, F. Menard, L. Close, C. Dumas, C.R. Chapman, and D.C. Slater (45) Eugenia I (Petit-Prince) Satellite of (45) Eugenia.

The Little Prince, Napolean-Eugene-Louis-Jean-Joseph Bonaparte (1856-1879), was the son of Eugenia de Montijo de Guzm\'an and Napoleon III. November 1, 1998 Mauna Kea W.J. Merline, L. Close, C. Dumas, C.R. Chapman, F. Roddier, F. Menard, D.C. Slater, G. Duvert, C. Shelton, and T. Morgan Jupiter and its Moons Satellites in the Jovian system are named for Zeus/Jupiter's lovers and descendants. Names of outer satellites with a prograde orbit generally end with the letter "a" (although an "o" ending has been reserved for some unusual cases), and names of satellites with a retrograde orbit end with an "e." Body Description Date of Discovery Discovery Location Discoverer Jupiter The largest and most massive of the planets was named Zeus by the Greeks and Jupiter by the Romans; he was the most important deity in both pantheons.

? ? ? Jupiter I (Io) Io, the daughter of Inachus, was changed by Jupiter into a cow to protect her from Hera's jealous wrath. But Hera recognized Io and sent a gadfly to torment her. Io, maddened by the fly, wandered throughout the Mediterranean region. January 8, 1610 Padua Galileo (Simon Marius probably made an independent discovery of the Galilean satellites at about the same time that Galileo did, and he may have unwittingly sighted them up to a month earlier, but the priority must go to Galileo because he published his discovery first.) Jupiter II (Europa) Beautiful daughter of Agenor, king of Tyre, she was seduced by Jupiter, who had assumed the shape of a white bull.

When Europa climbed on his back he swam with her to Crete, where she bore several children, including Minos. January 8, 1610 Padua Galileo (who evidently observed the combined image of Io and Europa the previous night) Jupiter III (Ganymede) Beautiful young boy who was carried to Olympus by Jupiter disguised as an eagle. Ganymede then became the cupbearer of the Olympian gods.

January 7, 1610 Padua Galileo Jupiter IV (Callisto) Beautiful daughter of Lycaon, she was seduced by Jupiter, who changed her into a bear to protect her from Hera's jealousy. January 7, 1610 Padua Galileo Jupiter V (Amalthea) A naiad who nursed the new-born Jupiter. She had as a favorite animal a goat which is said by some authors to have nourished Jupiter.

The name was suggested by Flammarion. September 9, 1892 Mt. Hamilton E.E. Barnard Jupiter VI (Himalia) A Rhodian nymph who bore three sons of Zeus. December 4, 1904 Mt. Hamilton C.D. Perrine Jupiter VII (Elara) Daughter of King Orchomenus, a paramour of Zeus, and by him the mother of the giant Tityus.

January 3, 1905 Mt. Hamilton C.D. Perrine Jupiter VIII (Pasiphae) Wife of Minos, king name a planet in our solar system Crete. Zeus made approaches to her as a bull (taurus). She then gave birth to the Minotaur. (Spelling changed from Pasiphaë to Pasiphae July 2009.) January 27, 1908 Greenwich P.J. Melotte Jupiter IX (Sinope) Daughter of the river god Asopus. Zeus desired to make love to her.

Instead of this he granted perpetual virginity, after he had been deceived by his own promises. (In the same way, she also fooled Apollo.) July 21, 1914 Mt. Hamilton S.B. Nicholson Jupiter X (Lysithea) Daughter name a planet in our solar system Kadmos, also named Semele, mother of Dionysos by Zeus.

According to others, she was the daughter of Evenus and mother of Helenus by Jupiter. July 6, 1938 Mt. Wilson S.B. Nicholson Jupiter XI (Carme) A nymph and attendant of Artemis; mother, by Zeus, of Britomartis. July 30, 1938 Mt. Wilson S.B. Nicholson Jupiter XII (Ananke) Goddess of fate and necessity, mother of Adrastea by Zeus. September 28, 1951 Mt.

Wilson S.B. Nicholson Jupiter XIII (Leda) Seduced by Zeus in the form of a swan, she was the mother of Pollux and Helen. September 11, 1974 Palomar C.T. Kowal Jupiter XIV (Thebe) An Egyptian king's daughter, granddaughter of Io, mother of Aigyptos by Zeus. The Egyptian city of Thebes was named after her. March 5, 1979 Voyager 1 Voyager Science Team Jupiter XV (Adrastea) A nymph of Crete to whose care Rhea entrusted the infant Zeus. July, 1979 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Jupiter XVI (Metis) First wife of Zeus.

He swallowed her when she became pregnant; Athena was subsequently born from the forehead of Zeus. March 4, 1979 Voyager 1 Voyager Science Team Jupiter XVII (Callirrhoe) Daughter name a planet in our solar system the river god Achelous and stepdaughter of Zeus.

October 19, 1999 Spacewatch J.V. Scotti, T.B. Spahr, R.S. McMillan, J.A. Larson, J. Montani, A.E. Gleason, and T. Gehrels Jupiter XVIII (Themisto) Daughter of the Arcadian river god Inachus, mother of Ister by Zeus. September 30, 1975, rediscovered November 21, 2000 Palomar, rediscovered at Mauna Kea C.T.

Kowal and E. Roemer (1975), and S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, Y.R. Fernandez, G. Magnier, M. Holman, B.G. Marsden, and G.V. Williams (2000). Jupiter XIX (Megaclite) Daughter of Macareus, who with Zeus gave birth to Thebe and Locrus. November 25, 2000 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, Y.R. Fernandez, and G. Magnier Jupiter XX (Taygete) Daughter of Atlas, one of the Pleiades, mother of Lakedaimon by Zeus.

November 25, 2000 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, Y.R. Fernandez, and G. Magnier Jupiter XXI (Chaldene) Bore the son Solymos with Zeus. November 26, 2000 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, Y.R. Fernandez, and G. Magnier Jupiter XXII (Harpalyke) Daughter and wife of Clymenus. In revenge for this incestuous relationship, she killed the son she bore him, cooked the corpse, and served it to Clymenus.

She was transformed into the night bird called Chalkis, and Clymenus hanged himself. Some say that she was transformed into that bird because she had intercourse with Zeus.

November 23, 2000 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, Y.R. Fernandez, and G. Magnier Jupiter XXIII (Kalyke) Nymph who bore the handsome son Endymion with Zeus.

November 23, 2000 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, Y.R. Fernandez, and G. Magnier Jupiter XXIV (Iocaste) Wife of Laius, King of Thebes, and mother of Oedipus. After Laius was killed, Iocaste unknowingly married her own son Oedipus. When she learned that her husband was her son, she killed herself. Some say she was the mother of Agamedes by Zeus. November 23, 2000 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, Y.R. Fernandez, and G. Magnier Jupiter XXV (Erinome) Daughter of Celes, compelled by Venus to fall in love with Jupiter.

November 23, 2000 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, Y.R. Fernandez, and G. Magnier Jupiter XXVI (Isonoe) A Danaid, bore with Zeus the son Orchomenos.

November 23, 2000 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, Y.R. Fernandez, and G. Magnier Jupiter XXVII (Praxidike) Goddess of punishment, mother of Klesios by Zeus. November 23, 2000 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, Y.R. Fernandez, and G. Magnier Jupiter XXVIII (Autonoe) Mother of the Graces by Zeus according to some authors. December 10, 2001 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt and J. Kleyna Jupiter XXIX (Thyone) Semele, mother of Dionysos by Zeus. She received the name of Thyone in Hades by Dionysos before he ascended up with her from there to heaven.

December 11, 2001 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt and J. Kleyna Jupiter XXX (Hermippe) Consort of Zeus and mother of Orchomenos by him. December 9, 2001 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt and J. Kleyna Jupiter XXXI (Aitne) A Sicilian nymph, conquest of Zeus. December 9, 2001 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C.

Jewitt and J. Kleyna Jupiter XXXII (Eurydome) Mother of the Graces by Zeus, according to some authors. (Source: Cornutus: Theologiae Graecae compendium 15) December 9, 2001 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt and J. Kleyna Jupiter XXXIII (Euanthe) The mother of the Graces by Zeus, according to some authors. December 11, 2001 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt and J.

Kleyna Jupiter XXXIV (Euporie) One of the Horae, a daughter of Zeus and Name a planet in our solar system. December 11, 2001 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt and J. Kleyna Jupiter XXXV (Orthosie) One of the Horae, a daughter of Zeus and Themis.

December 11, 2001 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt and J. Kleyna Jupiter XXXVI (Sponde) One of the Horae (Seasons), daughter of Zeus. December 9, 2001 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt and J. Kleyna Jupiter XXXVII (Kale) One of the Graces, a daughter of Zeus, husband of Hephaistos. December 9, 2001 Mauna Kea S.S. Name a planet in our solar system, D.C. Jewitt and J. Kleyna Jupiter XXXVIII (Pasithee) One of the Graces, a daughter of Zeus. December 11, 2001 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C.

Jewitt and J. Kleyna Jupiter XXXIX (Hegemone) One of the Graces, a daughter of Zeus. February 8, 2003 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard Jupiter XL (Mneme) One of the Muses, a daughter of Zeus. February 9, 2003 Mauna Kea B. Gladman and L. Allen Jupiter XLI (Aoede) One of the Muses, a daughter of Zeus. February 8, 2003 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard Jupiter XLII (Thelxinoe) One of the Muses, a daughter of Zeus. February 9, 2003 Mauna Kea S.S.

Sheppard Jupiter XLIII (Arche) One of the Muses, a daughter of Zeus. October 31, 2002 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard Jupiter XLIV (Kallichore) One of the Muses, a daughter of Zeus. February 6, 2003 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard Jupiter XLV (Helike) One of the Muses, a daughter of Zeus. February 6, 2003 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard Jupiter XLVI (Carpo) One of the Horae, a daughter of Zeus.

February 26, 2003 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard Jupiter XLVII (Eukelade) One name a planet in our solar system the Muses, a daughter of Zeus. February 5, 2003 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard Jupiter XLVIII (Cyllene) Daughter of Zeus, a nymph. February 9, 2003 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard Jupiter XLIX (Kore) Daughter of Zeus and Demeter, also known as Persephone. February 8, 2003 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, J. Kleyna Jupiter L (Herse) Daughter of Zeus and divine moon (Selene).

February 27, 2003 Mauna Kea B. Gladman, J. Kavelaars, J.-M. Petit, and L. Allen Jupiter LI (unnamed) September 7, 2010 Palomar R. Jacobson, M. Brozovic, B. Gladman, M. Alexandersen Jupiter LII (unnamed) September 8, 2010 Mauna Kea C. Veillet Jupiter LIII (Dia) Greek meaning "She who belongs to Zeus". Dia is the daughter of Eioneus known as the divine daughter of the seashore.

Zeus, disguised as a stallion, seduced Dia, who then gave birth to Peirithous.” December 5, 2000 Mauna Kea S. S. Sheppard, D. C. Jewitt, Y. R. Fernandez, and G. Magnier Jupiter LXII (Valetudo) Great-granddaughter of Jupiter. Roman name for Greek Hygeia. She is the goddess of health and hygiene. March 23, 2017 Cerro Tololo S. S. Sheppard Jupiter LXV (Pandia) Daughter of Zeus and the Moon goddess Selene, goddess of the full moon, and sister of Ersa. March 23, 2017 Cerro Tololo S.

S. Sheppard Jupiter LXXI (Ersa) Daughter of Zeus and the Moon goddess Selene, goddess of the dew, and sister of Pandia. May 11, 2018 Cerro Tololo S. S. Sheppard Saturn and its Moons Satellites in the saturnian system are named for Greco-Roman titans, descendants of the titans, the Roman god of the beginning, and giants from Greco-Roman and other mythologies.

Gallic, Inuit and Norse names identify three different orbit inclination groups, where inclinations are measured with respect to the ecliptic, not Saturn's equator or orbit. Retrograde satellites (those with an inclination of 90 to 180 degrees) are named for Norse giants (except for Phoebe, which was discovered long ago and is the largest).

Prograde satellites with an orbit inclination of around 36 degrees are named for Gallic giants, and prograde satellites with an inclination of around 48 degrees are named for Inuit giants and spirits. Note: 20 new moons discovered in 2019 and we are awaiting the official names to be selected before updating the table below.

Body Description Date of Discovery Discovery Location Discoverer Saturn Roman name for the Greek Cronos, father of Zeus/Jupiter. Other civilizations have given different names to Saturn, which is the farthest planet from Earth that can be observed by the naked human eye.

Most of its satellites were named for Titans who, according to Greek mythology, were brothers and sisters of Saturn. ? ? ? Saturn I (Mimas) Named by Herschel's son John in the early 19th century for a Giant felled by Hephaestus (or Ares) in the war between the Titans and Olympian gods. July 18, 1789 Slough W. Herschel Saturn II (Enceladus) Named by Herschel's son John for the Giant Enceladus. Enceladus was crushed by Athene in the battle between the Olympian gods and the Titans.

Earth piled on top of him became the island of Sicily. August 28, 1789 Slough W. Herschel Saturn III (Tethys) Cassini wished to name Tethys and the other three satellites that he discovered (Dione, Rhea, and Iapetus) for Louis XIV. However, the names used today for these satellites were applied in the early 19th century by John Herschel, who name a planet in our solar system them for Titans and Titanesses, brothers and sisters of Saturn.

Tethys was the wife of Oceanus and mother of all rivers and Oceanids. March 21, 1684 Paris G.D. Cassini Saturn IV (Dione) Dione was the sister of Cronos and mother (by Zeus) of Aphrodite.

March 21, 1684 Paris G.D. Cassini Saturn V (Rhea) A Titaness, mother of Zeus by Kronos. December 23, 1672 Paris G.D. Cassini Saturn VI (Titan) Named by Huygens, who first called it "Luna Saturni." In Greek Mythology, a Giant, and one of two generations of immortal giants (Titans) of incredible strength and stamina who were overthrown by a race of younger gods, the Olympians.

March 25, 1655 The Hague C. Huygens Saturn VII (Hyperion) Named by Lassell for one of the Titans. September 16, 1848 Cambridge, MA W.C. Bond and G.P. Bond; independently discovered September 18, 1848 at Liverpool by W. Lassell Saturn VIII (Iapetus) Named by John Herschel for one of the Titans.

October 25, 1671 Paris G.D. Cassini Saturn IX (Phoebe) Named by Pickering for one of the Titanesses. August 16, 1898 Arequipa W.H. Pickering Saturn X (Janus) First reported (though with an incorrect orbital period) and named by A. Dollfus from observations in Dec. 1966, this satellite was finally confirmed in 1980.

name a planet in our solar system

It was proven to have a twin, Epimetheus, sharing the same orbit but never actually meeting. It is named for the Roman god of the beginning. The two-faced god could look forward and backward at the same time. December 15, 1966 (Dollfus), February 19, 1980 (Pascu) Pic du Midi (Dollfus), Washington (Pascu) A. Dollfus (1966), D. Pascu (1980) Saturn XI (Epimetheus) First suspected by J. Fountain and S. Larson as confusing the detection of Janus.

They assigned the correct orbital period, and the satellite was finally confirmed in 1980. Named for the son of the Titan Iapetus. In contrast with his far-sighted brother Prometheus, he "subsequently realized" that he was in the wrong. 1977 (Fountain and Larson), February 26, 1980 (Cruikshank) Tucson (Fountain and Larson), Mauna Kea (Cruikshank) J. Fountain and S. Larson (1977), D.

Cruikshank (1980) Saturn XII (Helene) A granddaughter of Kronos, for her beauty she triggered off the Trojan War. March 1, 1980 Pic du Midi P. Laques and J. Lecacheux Saturn XIII (Telesto) Daughter of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. April 8, 1980 Tucson B.A. Smith, H. Reitsema, S.M. Larson, and J. Fountain Saturn XIV (Calypso) Daughter of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys and paramour of Odysseus. March 13, 1980 Flagstaff D. Pascu, P.K. Seidelmann, W. Baum, and D.

Currie Saturn XV (Atlas) A Titan; name a planet in our solar system held the heavens on his shoulders. October 1980 Voyager 1 Voyager Science Team Saturn XVI (Prometheus) Son of the Name a planet in our solar system Iapetus, brother of Atlas and Epimetheus, he gave many gifts to humanity, including fire. October 1980 Voyager 1 Voyager Science Team Saturn XVII (Pandora) Made of clay by Hephaestus at the request of Zeus.

She married Epimetheus and opened the box that loosed a host of plagues upon humanity. October 1980 Voyager 1 Voyager Science Team Saturn XVIII (Pan) Greek god of pastoralism, he was half goat and half human.

Son of Hermes, brother of Daphnis, and a descendant of the Titans. Discovered orbiting in the Encke division in Saturn's A ring. 1990 Voyager 2 M.R. Showalter Saturn XIX (Ymir) Ymir is the primordial Norse giant and the progenitor of the race of frost giants.

August 7, 2000 La Silla B. Gladman, J. Kavelaars, J.-M. Petit, H. Scholl, M. Holman, B.G. Marsden, P. Nicholson and J.A. Burns Saturn XX (Paaliaq) Named for an Inuit giant.

August 7, 2000 La Silla B. Gladman, J. Kavelaars, J.-M. Petit, H. Scholl, M. Holman, B.G. Marsden, P. Nicholson and J.A. Burns Saturn XXI (Tarvos) Named for a Gallic giant.

September 23, 2000 Mauna Kea B. Gladman, J. Kavelaars, J.-M. Petit, H. Scholl, M. Holman, B.G. Marsden, P. Nicholson and J.A. Burns Saturn XXII (Ijiraq) Named for an Inuit giant. September 23, 2000 Mauna Kea B. Gladman, J. Kavelaars, J.-M. Petit, H. Scholl, M.

Holman, B.G. Marsden, P. Nicholson and J.A. Burns Saturn XXIII (Suttungr) Named for a Norse giant who kindled flames that destroyed the world. September 23, 2000 Mauna Kea B. Gladman, J. Kavelaars, J.-M. Petit, H. Scholl, M. Holman, B.G. Marsden, P. Nicholson and J.A. Burns Saturn XXIV (Kiviuq) Named for an Inuit giant. August 7, 2000 La Silla B. Gladman, J.

Kavelaars, J.-M. Petit, H. Scholl, M. Holman, B.G. Marsden, P. Nicholson and J.A. Burns Saturn XXV (Mundilfari) Named for an Norse giant.

name a planet in our solar system

September 23, 2000 Mauna Kea B. Gladman, J. Kavelaars, J.-M. Petit, H. Scholl, M. Holman, B.G. Marsden, P. Nicholson and J.A. Burns Saturn XXVI (Albiorix) Named for a Gallic giant who was considered to be the king of the world.

November 9, 2000 Mt. Hopkins M. Holman Saturn XXVII (Skathi) Named for a Norse giantess. September 23, 2000 Mauna Kea B. Gladman, J. Kavelaars, J.-M. Petit, H. Scholl, M. Holman, B.G. Marsden, P. Nicholson and J.A. Burns Saturn XXVIII (Erriapus) Named for a Gallic giant. September 23, 2000 Mauna Kea B. Gladman, J. Kavelaars, J.-M.

Petit, H. Scholl, M. Holman, B.G. Marsden, P. Nicholson and J.A. Burns Saturn XXIX (Siarnaq) Named for an Inuit giant. September 23, 2000 Mauna Kea B. Gladman, J. Kavelaars, J.-M.

name a planet in our solar system

Petit, H. Scholl, M. Holman, B.G. Marsden, P. Nicholson and J.A. Burns Saturn XXX (Thrymr) Named for a Norse giant. September 23, 2000 Mauna Kea B. Gladman, J. Kavelaars, J.-M. Petit, H. Scholl, M. Holman, B.G. Marsden, P. Nicholson and J.A. Burns Saturn XXXI (Narvi) Named for a Norse giant. February 5, 2003 Mauna Kea S.S.

Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, and J. Kleyna Saturn XXXII (Methone) One of the Alkyonides, the seven beautiful daughters of the Giant Alkyoneos. June 1, 2004 Cassini Imaging Science Team Saturn XXXIII (Pallene) One of the Alkyonides, the seven beautiful daughters of the Giant Alkyoneos. June 1, 2004 Cassini Imaging Science Team Saturn XXXIV (Polydeuces) Twin brother of Castor, son of Zeus and Leda.

October 21, 2004 Cassini Imaging Science Team Saturn XXXV (Daphnis) Shepherd, pipes player, and pastoral poet in Greek mythology. Son of Hermes, brother of Pan, and decendant of the Titans. Discovered orbiting in the Keeler gap in Saturn's A ring.

name a planet in our solar system

May 1, 2005 Cassini Imaging Science Team Saturn XXXVI (Aegir) Norse ocean giant who represents the peaceful sea, a stiller of storms. December 12, 2004 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, J. Kleyna Saturn XXXVII (Bebhionn) Beautiful Celtic giantess. December 12, 2004 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, J. Kleyna Saturn XXXVIII (Bergelmir) Norse frost giant, son of Ymir and one of the Hrimthursar, one of only two members of the frost giant race to escape being drowned in Ymir's blood. December 12, 2004 Mauna Kea S.

Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, J. Kleyna Saturn XXXIX (Bestla) Norse primeval goddess, mother of deities, daughter of the giant Bolthorn.

December 13, 2004 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, J. Kleyna Saturn XL (Farbauti) Norse storm giant, father of Loki. December 12, 2004 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C.

Jewitt, J. Kleyna Saturn XLI (Fenrir) Norse monstrous wolf, son name a planet in our solar system Loki and the giantess Angurboda, father of Hati and Skoll. December 13, 2004 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, J. Kleyna Saturn XLII (Fornjot) Early Norse storm giant, father of Aegir, Kari, and Loge. December 12, 2004 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, J. Kleyna Saturn XLIII (Hati) Gigantic Norse wolf, twin of Skoll. December 12, 2004 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, J. Kleyna Saturn XLIV (Hyrrokkin) Norse giantess who launched Balder's funeral ship.

(Spelling changed from Hyrokkin.) December 12, 2004 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, J. Kleyna Saturn XLV (Kari) Norse wind giant. January 4, 2006 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, J. Kleyna Saturn XLVI (Loge) Norse fire giant, son of Fornjot. January 5, 2006 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, J. Kleyna Saturn XLVII (Skoll) Gigantic Norse wolf, twin of Name a planet in our solar system.

January 5, 2006 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, J. Kleyna Saturn XLVIII (Surtur) Norse leader of the fire giants. January 5, 2006 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, J. Kleyna Saturn XLIX (Anthe) One of the Alkyonides, the seven beautiful daughters of the Giant Alkyoneos. May 30, 2007 Cassini Imaging Science Team Saturn L (Jarnsaxa) Name a planet in our solar system giantess and Thor's lover. January 5, 2006 Mauna Kea S.

Sheppard, D.C. Jewittt, J. Kleyna Saturn LI (Greip) Norse giantess. January 5, 2006 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewittt, J. Kleyna Saturn LII (Tarqeq) Inuit moon spirit. January 16, 2007 Mauna Kea S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewittt, J. Kleyna Saturn LIII (Aegaeon) Greek hundred-armed giant, called Briareus by the gods. August 15, 2008 Cassini Imaging Science Team Uranus and its Moons Satellites in the uranian system are named for characters from Shakespeare's plays and from Pope's "Rape of the Lock." Body Description Date of Discovery Discovery Location Discoverer Uranus Several astronomers, including Flamsteed and Le Monnier, had observed Uranus earlier but had recorded it as a fixed star.

Herschel tried unsuccessfully to name his discovery "Georgian Sidus" after George III; the planet was named by Johann Bode in 1781 after the ancient Greek deity of the sky Uranus, the name a planet in our solar system of Kronos (Saturn) and grandfather of Zeus (Jupiter).

March 13, 1781 Bath W. Herschel Uranus I (Ariel) Named by John Herschel for a sylph in Pope's "Rape of the Lock." October 24, 1851 Liverpool W. Lassell Uranus II (Umbriel) Umbriel was named by John Herschel for a malevolent spirit in Pope's "Rape of the Lock." October 24, 1851 Liverpool W.

Lassell Uranus III (Titania) Named by Herschel's son John in early 19th century for the queen of the fairies in Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream." January 11, 1787 Slough W. Herschel Uranus IV (Oberon) Named by Herschel's son John in early 19th century for the king of the fairies in Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream." January 11, 1787 Slough W.

Herschel Uranus V (Miranda) Named by Kuiper for the heroine of Shakespeare's "The Tempest." February 16, 1948 Fort Davis G.P. Kuiper Uranus VI (Cordelia) Daughter of Lear in Shakespeare's "King Lear." January 20, 1986 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Uranus VII (Ophelia) Daughter of Polonius, fiance of Hamlet in Shakespeare's "Hamlet, Prince of Denmark." January 20, 1986 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Uranus VIII (Bianca) Daughter of Baptista, sister of Kate, in Shakespeare's "Taming of the Shrew." January 23, 1986 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Uranus IX (Cressida) Title character in Shakespeare's "Troilus and Cressida." January 9, 1986 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Uranus X (Desdemona) Wife of Othello in Shakespeare's "Othello, the Moor of Venice." January 13, 1986 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Uranus XI (Juliet) Heroine of Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet." January 3, 1986 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Uranus XII (Portia) Wife of Brutus in Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar." January 3, 1986 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Uranus XIII (Rosalind) Daughter of the banished duke in Shakespeare's "As You Like It." January 13, 1986 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Uranus XIV (Belinda) Character in Pope's "Rape of the Lock." January 13, 1986 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Uranus XV (Puck) Mischievous spirit in Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream." December 30, 1985 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Uranus XVI (Caliban) Named for the grotesque, brutish slave in Shakespeare's "The Tempest." September 6, 1997 Palomar B.

Gladman, P. Nicholson, J.A. Burns and J. Kavelaars Uranus XVII (Sycorax) Named for Caliban's mother in Shakespeare's "The Tempest." September 6, 1997 Palomar P. Nicholson, B. Gladman, J. Burns and J. Kavelaars Uranus XVIII (Prospero) Named for the rightful Duke of Milan in "The Tempest." July 18, 1999 Mauna Kea M. Holman, J. Kavelaars, B.

Gladman, J.-M. Petit, and H. Scholl Uranus XIX (Setebos) Setebos was a new-world (South American) deity's name that Shakespeare popularized as Sycorax's god in "The Tempest." July 18, 1999 Mauna Kea J.

Kavelaars, B. Gladman, M. Holman, J.-M. Petit, and H. Scholl Uranus XX (Stephano) Named for a drunken butler in "The Tempest." July 18, 1999 Mauna Kea B. Gladman, M. Holman, J. Kavelaars, J.-M. Petit, and H. Scholl Uranus XXI (Trinculo) A jester in Shakespeare's "The Tempest." August 13, 2001 Cerro Tololo M. Holman, J.J. Kavelaars and D. Milisavljevic Uranus XXII (Francisco) A lord in "The Tempest." August 13, 2001 Cerro Tololo J.

Kavelaars, M. Holman, D. Milisavljevic, and T. Grav Uranus XXIII (Margaret) A gentlewoman attending on Hero from "Much Ado About Nothing." August 29, 2003 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt Uranus XXIV (Ferdinand) Son of the King of Naples in "The Tempest." August 13, 2001 Cerro Tololo D. Milisavljevic, M. Holman, J. Kavelaars, and T. Grav Uranus XXV (Perdita) Daughter of Leontes and Hermione in "The Winter's Tale." January 18, 1986 Voyager 2 E. Karkoschka Uranus XXVI (Mab) The fairies' midwife in "Romeo and Juliet." August 25, 2003 Hubble Space Telescope M.R.

Showalter and J.J. Lissauer Uranus XXVII (Cupid) A character in "Timon of Athens." August 25, 2003 Hubble Space Telescope M.R. Showalter and J.J. Lissauer Neptune and its Moons Satellites in the neptunian system are named for characters from Greek or Roman mythology associated with Neptune or Poseidon or the oceans. Irregular satellites are named for the Nereids, the daughters of Nereus and Doris, and the attendants of Neptune.

Body Description Date of Discovery Discovery Location Discoverer Neptune Neptune was "predicted" by John Couch Adams and Urbain Le Verrier who, independently, were able to account for the irregularities in the motion of Uranus by correctly predicting the orbital elements of a trans- Uranian body.

Using the predicted parameters of Le Verrier (Adams never published his predictions), Johann Galle observed the planet in 1846. Galle wanted to name the planet for Le Verrier, but that was not acceptable to the international astronomical community.

Instead, this planet is named for the Roman god of the sea. September 23, 1846 Berlin J.G. Galle Neptune I (Triton) Triton is named for the sea-god son of Poseidon (Neptune) and Amphitrite. The first suggestion of the name Triton has been attributed to the French astronomer Camille Flammarion.

October 10, 1846 Liverpool W. Lassell Neptune II (Nereid) The Nereids were the fifty daughters of the sea god Nereus and Doris and were attendants of Poseidon (Neptune). May 1, 1949 Fort Davis G.P. Kuiper Neptune III (Naiad) The name of a group of Greek water nymphs who were guardians of lakes, fountains, springs, and rivers. August 1989 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Neptune IV (Thalassa) Greek sea goddess.

Mother of Aphrodite in some legends; others say she bore the Telchines. August 1989 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Neptune V (Despina) Daughter of Poseidon (Neptune) and Demeter. July 1989 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Neptune VI (Galatea) One of the Nereids, attendants of Poseidon. July 1989 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Neptune VII (Larissa) A lover of Poseidon. After the discovery by Voyager, it was established that an occultation of a star by this satellite had been fortuitously observed in 1981 by H.

Reitsema, W. Hubbard, L. Lebofsky, and D. J. Tholen. July 1989 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Neptune VIII (Proteus) Greek sea god, son of Oceanus and Tethys.

June 1989 Voyager 2 Voyager Science Team Neptune IX (Halimede) One of the Nereids, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. August 14, 2002 Cerro Tololo M. Holman, J. Kavelaars, T. Grav, W. Fraser, and D. Milisavljevic Neptune X (Psamathe) One of the Nereids, lover of Aeacus and mother of Phocus. August 29, 2003 Mauna Kea S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, and J.

Kleyna Neptune XI (Sao) One of the Nereids, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. August 14, 2002 Cerro Tololo T. Grav, M. Holman, J. Kavelaars, W. Fraser, and D. Milisavljevic Neptune XII (Laomedeia) One of the Nereids, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. August 13, 2002 Cerro Tololo J. Kavelaars, M. Holman, T. Grav, W. Fraser, and D. Milisavljevic Neptune XIII (Neso) One of the Nereids, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris.

August 14, 2002 Cerro Tololo M. Holman, J. Kavelaars, T. Grav, W. Fraser, and D. Milisavljevic Neptune XIV (Hippocamp) Mythical seahorse in Greek mythology, a symbol of Poseidon. July 15, 2013 Hubble Space Telescope M. Showalter, I. de Pater, T. Grav, J. J. Lissauer, and R. S. French Dwarf Planets and their Moons Ceres Body Description Date of Discovery Discovery Location Discoverer (1) Ceres Roman goddess of corn and harvests.

January 1, 1801 Palermo Astronomical Observatory Giuseppe Piazzi Pluto and its Moons Satellites in the plutonian system are named for characters and creatures in the myths surrounding Pluto (Greek Hades) and the name a planet in our solar system Greek and Roman Underworld. Body Description Date of Discovery Discovery Location Discoverer (134340) Pluto Pluto was discovered at Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, AZ during a systematic search for a trans-Neptune planet predicted by Percival Lowell and William H.

Pickering. Named after the Roman god of the underworld who was able to render himself invisible. January 23, 1930 Flagstaff C.W. Tombaugh (134340) Pluto I (Charon) Named after the Greek mythological boatman who ferried souls across the river Styx to Pluto for judgement. April 13, 1978 Flagstaff J.W. Christy (134340) Pluto II (Nix) Goddess of darkness and night, mother of Charon. (Nix is the Egyptian spelling of the Greek name Nyx.) May 15, 2005 Hubble Space Telescope H.A.

Weaver, S.A. Stern, M.J. Mutchler, A.J. Steffl, M.W. Buie, W.J. Merline, J.R. Spencer, E.F. Young, and L.A. Young (134340) Pluto III (Hydra) In Greek mythology, terrifying monster with the body of a serpent and nine heads that guarded the underworld. May 15, 2005 Hubble Space Telescope H.A. Weaver, S.A. Stern, M.J. Mutchler, A.J. Steffl, M.W. Buie, W.J. Merline, J.R. Spencer, E.F. Young, and L.A. Young (134340) Pluto IV (Kerberos) In Greek mythology, the many-headed dog that guarded the entrance to the underworld.

June 28, 2011 Hubble Space Telescope M.R. Showalter, D.P. Hamilton, S.A. Stern, H.A. Weaver, A.J. Steffl, and L.A. Young (134340) Pluto V (Styx) Greek goddess who ruled over the underworld river also named Styx.

June 26, 2012 Hubble Space Telescope M.R. Showalter, H.A. Weaver, S.A. Stern, A.J. Steffl, M.W. Buie, W.J. Merline, M.J. Mutchler, R. Soummer, and H.B. Throop Haumea and its Moons Body Description Date of Discovery Discovery Location Discoverer (136108) Haumea Hawaiian goddess of childbirth and fertility. March 7, 2003 Sierra Nevada Observatory, Spain ? (136108) Haumea I (Hi'iaka) Daughter of Haumea, patron goddess of the island of Hawaii and of hula dancers.

January 26, 2005 Keck Observatory, Mauna Kea M.E. Brown and the adaptive-optics team (136108) Haumea II (Namaka) Daughter of Haumea, water spirit in Hawaiian mythology. November 7, 2005 Keck Observatory, Mauna Kea M.E. Brown and the adaptive-optics team Eris and its Moons Body Description Date of Discovery Discovery Location Discoverer (136199) Eris Greek goddess of discord and strife.

October 21, 2003 Palomar Observatory M.E. Brown, C.A. Trujillo, and D. Rabinowitz (136199) Eris I (Dysnomia) Eris' daughter, spirit of lawlessness. September 10, 2005 Keck Observatory, Mauna Kea M.E. Brown and the adaptive-optics team Makemake Body Description Date of Discovery Discovery Location Discoverer (136472) Makemake Polynesian (Rapa Nui/Easter Island) creator god.

March 31, 2005 Palomar Observatory M.E. Brown, C.A. Trujillo, and D.L. Rabinowitz All the information on this page is public domain and comes from the International Astronomical Union Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature.

"Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature." (05/12/2018). http://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/ The IAU Minor Planet Center maintains a list of minor planet names.

IAU Resolutions 5 and 6, "Definition of a Planet in the Solar System" AND "Pluto" IAU Press Release from the 2006 General Assembly "Result of the IAU Resolution Votes" IAU "Naming Astronomical Objects" IAU Press Release "Plutoid chosen as name for Solar System objects like Pluto" none
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Learn more about the course details here. Name a planet in our solar system Academy offers Earth science and astronomy as homeschooling courses. TraintheBrain provides online tutoring aimed at the deep discovery of astronomy, earth science, and more subjects related to our solar system.

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• Best Space (Astronomy) Hoodies for Kids • Best Space T-Shirts for Kids • Best High Power Binoculars for Experts • Best Travel Telescopes • Choosing Your Astronomy Equipment • Best Space T-Shirts Adults • Best Astronomy Gifts under $100 • Monocular vs. Binoculars- Which One is Best for StargazingPlanets [ ] Name of Planet Distance from Sun Diameter in kilometers Location Mercury 35.6 million miles 4,880 Solar system Venus 67.2 million miles 12,102 Solar system Earth 92.96 million miles 12,756 Solar system Mars 142.5 million miles 6,794 Solar system Jupiter 483.6 million miles 142,984 Solar system Saturn 883.6 million miles 120,536 Solar system Uranus 1.8 billion miles 51,118 Solar system Neptune 2.7 billion miles 49,532 Solar system Dwarf planets [ ] Hypothetical Planets [ ] Name of Hypothetical Planet Distance from Sun Diameter in kilometers Vulcan 0.55 million miles Unknown Nemesis 95 billion miles Unknown Planet X 65 trillion miles Unknown Theia 3.792 million miles 6800 9 Unknown 35,000 to 52,000 10 Unknown 8300 Antichthon Unknown Unknown Phaeton pp Unknown

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