Final champion 2021

final champion 2021

site: media - arena: collegebasketball - pageType: stories - section: - slug: ncaa-championship-2021-score-baylor-routs-gonzaga-as-bears-win-first-national-title-end-zags-perfect-season - sport: collegebasketball - route: live_blog_single - 6-keys: media/spln/collegebasketball/reg/free/stories_live-blog • Paramount+ • UEFA Final champion 2021 League • UEFA Europa League • UEFA Europa Conference League • Italian Serie A • Coppa Italia • Liga Argentina Profesional • Scottish Professional Football League • NWSL Challenge Cup • AFC Champions League • Brasileirão Serie A • Watch CBS Sports Network • TV Shows & Listings • Bet The only opponent Gonzaga could not beat was its last.

The previously-undefeated Bulldogs took their first loss of the season, falling 86-70 to No. 1 seed Baylor on Monday in the NCAA Tournament championship game.

In a stunningly lopsided season finale the Zags never once led in, Gonzaga's season ends with a 31-1 record and with Baylor -- 73 years removed from its last national championship game appearance -- celebrating its first-ever men's basketball title.

Baylor ascended to the top of the sport with style, too, jumping out early to a 9-0 lead. Which turned to 11-1. Which turned into 29-10 less than 10 minutes into the game. It marked the largest deficit Gonzaga faced all season. Despite this, Gonzaga had its share of runs, cutting the lead to 10 by halftime and to nine points in the second half.

But Baylor had a bigger share of runs, led by 10 made 3-pointers and buttressed by a big game on the offensive boards that gave it 18 more final champion 2021 attempts. Its lead after dipping to single digits ballooned to as many as 20 in the second half, as Baylor sucked the life out of the only team that never looked lifeless all season. "They came out and they fed off of each other.

We got off to a great start," Baylor coach Scott Drew said. "And then defensively, we're pretty good." Baylor blows out Gonzaga in shocking, dominant fashion. A championship edition of Eye on College Basketball recaps the national championship game. Baylor guards Jared Butler, MaCio Teague and Jared Butler -- long the staples of success for this team -- fittingly led the way for the Bears with a combined 56 points and 12 assists. Butler was the catalyst behind the sharpshooting effort that did not cease, as he went for 22 points with a game-high four 3-pointers and seven assists.

final champion 2021

He became the first player in a men's national championship game to produce at least 20 points and seven assists since Carmelo Anthony did it for Syracuse in 2003. Here are a few takeaways final champion 2021 Monday night's grand finale. 1. Gonzaga's place in history Gonzaga became the first undefeated team since Indiana State in 1979 to enter the title game and lose, pushing undefeated teams in the national championship to 7-3 all-time.

The loss complicates the legacy of a team that otherwise was trending towards sports immortality. Win, and it would be the first since Indiana in 1976 to become an undefeated champion. Lose, as they did, and they're now one of several great teams -- 1991 UNLV, 1999 Duke and 2015 Kentucky to name a few -- that were dominant yet unable to go the distance.

An unassailable resume this team would have had with a win to top it off in the finale, but by every metric this team's place among great college basketball teams is etched into stone. 2. Baylor's shooting, extra chances the difference Gonzaga's historically efficient offense took a tiny step back from its regular dominance, as the team finished 25-of-49 from the floor and 5-of-17 from 3-point range. But -- like the rest of the game -- the outcome was a credit to Baylor acting as the aggressor.

The Bears made 10 3s on the night but four of those came in the opening 10 minutes, with Teague's triple at the 10:09 mark building their lead to 19 points. When Baylor is that hot from the field, it has been difficult to beat.

But when you combine that with extra opportunities -- Baylor took 18 more shot attempts than Gonzaga, in part by grabbing 16 offensive rebounds -- it's a formula Gonzaga in the end could not crack. "Baylor just beat us in every facet of the game tonight," Gonzaga coach Mark Few said. "The aggressiveness and the athleticism of Baylor just had us on our heels. Usually when you're the most aggressive team you're going to get the calls, you're going to make the plays. They were just clearly way more aggressive than us pretty much the entire night." 3.

A rebuild complete On Aug. 22, 2003, Baylor introduced Final champion 2021 Drew as its next men's basketball coach. A wide-eyed Drew vowed he did not come to the university just to go to the NCAA Tournament; he "came to win games" in the NCAA Tournament. "We came with a chance to win the national championship," he said. When he said that, it was a pipe dream. A Baylor player only months before his hire had murdered another player.

The team hadn't achieved a final champion 2021 record in two seasons. And yet he built, and built, and built. An NCAA Tournament appearance in his fifth year. Elite Eights in 2010 and 2012. And finally, a Final Four and national championship in 2021.

What he started nearly two decades ago culminated Monday night in Indianapolis as one of the most successful, and unlikely, rebuilds in all of college athletics. CBS Sports HQ Newsletter We bring sports news that matters to your inbox, to help you stay informed and get a winning edge.

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Game Recap: Bucks 109, Suns 103 Led by Khris Middletons 40 points (24 in the 2nd half), six rebounds and four assists, the Bucks defeated the Suns, 109-103, in Game 4. Giannis Antetokounmpo added 26 points, 14 rebounds and eight assists for the Bucks in the victory, while Devin Booker tallied a game-high 42 points for the Suns. This best-of-seven series is now tied, 2-2, with Game 5 taking place on Saturday, July 17 at 9:00 p.m. ET Game Recap: Bucks 120, Suns 100 Led by Giannis Antetokounmpos 41 points (14-23 FG, 13-17 FT), 13 rebounds and six final champion 2021, the Bucks defeated the Suns, 120-100, in Game 3.

Jrue Holiday added 21 points, five rebounds and nine assists for the Bucks in the victory, while Chris Paul tallied 19 points and nine assists for the Suns. The Suns lead this best-of-seven series, 2-1, with Game 4 taking place on Wednesday, July 14 at 9:00 p.m. ET © 2022 NBA Media Ventures, LLC. All rights reserved. • Privacy Policy • Terms of Use • Accessibility and Closed Captions • Do Not Sell My Personal Information • Customer Support • Manage Preferences If you are having difficulty accessing any content on this website, please visit our Accessibility page.

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The Blues got a goal in the first half from Kai Havertz, and City couldn't respond as superstar Kevin De Bruyne left in the second half due to injury. The Blues controlled the match from the beginning and used their patient, organized defense to hold City's attack at bay for the majority of the match as Pep Guardiola's men rarely looked like a threat going forward. Guardiola brought on Sergio Aguero and Gabriel Jesus, but the tinkering with his starting XI did not work out as his surprise inclusion of Raheem Sterling resulted in very little.

Thee Londoners claimed their second ever UCL crown, and their first since 2012. Chelsea's Christian Pulisic made history as the first USMNT player to appear in the Champions League final, though he was unable to convert on a goal-scoring chance off the bench.

Here are three takeaways from Saturday's final in Porto: Chelsea set the tone early Everybody knew this game was going to be defensive. Chances were also going to be hard to come by, and I'm not counting the ones that Timo Werner shanks from point-blank range.

The first and probably best chance City got came in the first half from Phil Foden as he was shifted to striker by Guardiola. So, when De Bruyne played him cleanly through, the opener looked on the verge of falling. until Antonio Rudiger got involved. The German, who made quite an impact in this match, delivered a perfectly timed tackle that set the tone for his team throughout the match.

Take a look: Rudiger with a clutch tackle 🔥 pic.twitter.com/USVfuiowXK— Champions League on CBS Sports (@UCLonCBSSports) May 29, 2021 The confidence, the cohesion and the belief all grew from that moment on for Chelsea. Craving even more coverage of the world's game?

Listen below and follow ¡Qué Golazo! A Final champion 2021 CBS Soccer Final champion 2021 where we take you beyond the pitch and around the globe for commentary, previews, recaps and more. Sensational Mount is the real MVP Nobody lovess Havertz more final champion 2021 me.

I have said in the past when he was in the Bundesliga, that he should be mentioned in the same conversation as the likes of Erling Haaland.

final champion 2021

He proved his worth by stepping up in the biggest game, but a lot of the credit has to go to another young superstar: Chelsea's Mason Mount. His through ball to set up Havertz was absolutely tasty, taking advantage of Ruben Dias holding the German on. Take a look: KAI HAVERTZ. BREAKTHROUGH. 💥 WHAT A TIME TO GET YOUR FIRST #UCL GOAL 🌟 pic.twitter.com/ghI2BzGP9V— Champions League on CBS Sports (@UCLonCBSSports) May 29, 2021 The young superstar didn't have a lot of chances to make an impact, but when he did, he delivered a smooth ball to the perfect spot, forever cementing himself as a Chelsea legend.

CBS Sports HQ Newsletter Your Ultimate Guide to Every Day in Sports We bring sports news that matters to your inbox, to help you stay informed and get a winning edge. By submitting my email I agree to receive the "CBS Sports HQ Newsletter" and other marketing and promotional emails from CBS Sports, which may include information from our affiliates and/or partners' offers, products and services.

For more information about our data practices consult our Privacy Policy Sorry! There was an error processing your subscription. KDB injury was final blow Rudiger certainly didn't mean it, and it wasn't dirty, but his collision with De Bruyne altered the game big time.

City weren't looking all that dangerous with De Bruyne, but without him? Even less so. City lost their best player for the last 30 minutes after he ran into Rudiger and had to come off the pitch. City barely knocked on the door after that. All Rudiger was trying to do was slow KDB down, but in the the end the challenge killed any chance City had of coming back. Pinned Pep Guardiola after the match, via UEFA: "Decisions are always to try to win the game. The way we played the game in the second half, they had one counter attack with Pulisic.

They're a really good team, but we competed perfectly against them. In the second half we deserved to score one goal but we couldn't do it." CBS Sports HQ Newsletter We bring sports news that matters to your inbox, to help you stay informed and get a winning edge. By submitting my email I agree to receive the "CBS Sports HQ Newsletter" and other marketing and promotional emails from CBS Sports, which may include information from our affiliates and/or partners' offers, products and services.

For more information about our data practices consult our Privacy Policy
The 2021/22 EFL Championship concluded its league phase on an entertaining final day as 31 goals were scored across Saturday's 12 games. With relegation and automatic promotion already settled, the four playoff places were the main focus of attention. Nottingham Forest and Huddersfield Town went into Saturday's fixtures having already guaranteed themselves a top-six finish, while Sheffield United and Luton Town were hoping to hold onto their playoff spots under pressure from Middlesbrough and Millwall.

Huddersfield started the final day in fourth place but ended the season in third. They won 2-0 at home to Bristol City, while Forest dropped one spot after being held to a 1-1 draw at Hull City.

Sheffield United had the unenviable task of facing free-scoring champions Fulham on the final day. But the Blades made light work of the EPL-bound Cottagers by thrashing them 4-0 at Bramall Lane. Luton also won to guarantee their spot in the top six. They overcame Reading 1-0 to finish five points clear of Middlesbrough, who were thrashed 4-1 at Preston. Luton Town's players applaud their home fans after ending the 2021/22 Championship league season with a 1-0 win over Reading IMAGO/News Images/Richard Washbrooke Boro finished the season seventh, one point above Millwall, who dropped to ninth after losing 1-0 at already-promoted Bournemouth.

Blackburn finished eighth. The final champion 2021 to join Fulham and Bournemouth in next season's Premier League will resume on Friday when the Championship playoffs begin.

Championship Playoff Fixtures And Dates Luton vs Huddersfield (1st leg) - Friday, May 13 Huddersfield vs Luton (2nd leg) - Monday, May 16 Sheffield United final champion 2021 Nottingham Forest (1st leg) - Saturday, May 14 Nottingham Forest vs Sheffield United (2nd leg) - Tuesday, May 17 Championship final at Wembley - Sunday, May 29
Match programme cover Event 2020–21 UEFA Champions League Manchester City Chelsea 0 1 Date 29 May 2021 ( final champion 2021 Venue Estádio do Dragão, Porto Man of the Match N'Golo Kanté (Chelsea) [1] Referee Antonio Mateu Lahoz ( Spain) [2] Attendance 14,110 [3] Weather Clear night 19 °C (66 °F) 72% humidity [4] 2022 → The 2021 UEFA Final champion 2021 League Final was the final match of the 2020–21 UEFA Champions League, the 66th season of Europe's premier club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 29th season since it was renamed from the European Cup to the UEFA Champions League.

It was played at the Estádio do Dragão in Porto, Portugal on 29 May 2021, [5] between English clubs Manchester City, in their first UEFA Champions League final, and 2012 winners Chelsea. This was the third all-English final in the competition, after the 2008 and 2019 finals. The final was originally scheduled to be played at the Krestovsky Stadium in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

final champion 2021

However, due to the postponement and relocation of the 2020 final to Lisbon as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe, the final hosts were shifted back a year, with the Atatürk Olympic Stadium in Istanbul, Turkey instead planning to host the 2021 final. [6] Two weeks before the final, UEFA announced that it would be relocated to Porto to allow a limited number of fans to attend the match. [5] A capacity limit of 33% was agreed for the 50,000-seater Estádio do Dragão, resulting in an attendance of 14,110.

[7] Chelsea won the final 1–0 for their second UEFA Champions League title, with Kai Havertz scoring the only goal of the game late in the first half. [8] As winners, they earned the right to play against the winners of the 2020–21 UEFA Europa League, Villarreal, in the 2021 UEFA Super Cup, and also qualified for the 2021 FIFA Club World Cup, both of which they won. Contents • 1 Teams • 2 Venue • 2.1 Initial host selection • 2.2 Relocation to Porto final champion 2021 3 Background • 4 Road to the final • 5 Pre-match • 5.1 Officials • 5.2 Opening ceremony • 6 Match • 6.1 Summary • 6.2 Details • 6.3 Statistics • 7 See also • final champion 2021 Notes • 9 References • 10 External links Teams [ edit ] In the following table, finals until 1992 were in the European Cup era, since 1993 were in the UEFA Champions League era.

Team Previous final appearances (bold indicates winners) Manchester City None Chelsea 2 ( 2008, 2012) Venue [ edit ] The Estádio do Dragão in Porto hosted the final. The match was the fourth European Cup/Champions League final to take place in Portugal, and the first to take place outside Lisbon, which previously hosted finals in 1967 at the Estádio Nacional and in 2014 and 2020 at the Estádio da Luz. This was the first time the European Cup/Champions League final took place in the same country in successive seasons.

[9] The Estádio do Dragão previously hosted matches at UEFA Euro 2004 and the 2019 UEFA Nations League Finals. Additionally, this final was the first since 2004 to be held in a stadium with capacity lower than 60,000. [ citation needed] Initial host selection [ edit ] For the details on the selection of Saint Petersburg as the original host for the final, see 2022 UEFA Champions League Final § Host selection.

An open bidding process was launched on 22 September 2017 by UEFA to select the venues of the finals of the UEFA Champions League, Final champion 2021 Europa League, and UEFA Women's Champions League in 2020. Associations had until 31 October 2017 to express interest, and bid dossiers must be submitted by 1 March 2018.

Associations hosting matches at UEFA Euro 2020 were not allowed to bid for the 2020 UEFA Champions League final. [ citation needed] UEFA announced on 3 November 2017 that two associations had expressed interest in hosting the 2020 UEFA Champions League final. [10] Bidding associations for final Country Stadium City Capacity Notes Portugal Estádio da Luz Lisbon 65,647 Hosted the 2014 UEFA Champions League Final Turkey Atatürk Olympic Stadium Istanbul 76,092 Hosted the 2005 UEFA Champions League Final The Atatürk Olympic Stadium was selected by the UEFA Executive Committee during their meeting in Kyiv on 24 May 2018.

[11] [12] [13] On 17 June 2020, the UEFA Executive Committee announced that due to the postponement and relocation of the 2020 final to the Estádio da Luz, Istanbul would instead host the 2021 final. [6] Relocation to Porto [ edit ] Due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey, Premier League side Aston Villa final champion 2021 to have Villa Park in Birmingham as the venue for the Champions League Final instead of Istanbul to hold 8,000 English fans, which could be affected by travel limitations.

[14] Villa Park has previously hosted the 1999 Cup Winners' Cup Final, the last final of that UEFA competition. It also hosted the 2012 FA Community Shield, also contested between Manchester City and Chelsea, due to Wembley Stadium – England's national stadium – hosting the Olympic football tournament finals in the previous days, being picked in part because of its equidistance between Manchester and London. On 7 May 2021, Secretary of State for Transport Grant Shapps advised against any fans traveling to Turkey for the game.

[15] In negotiations with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, UEFA would only consider Wembley as a potential venue within the United Kingdom, and required guarantees that their officials, sponsors and journalists would be exempt from the UK COVID-19 travel restrictions.

[16] The British Government was unable to agree to this, [17] and on 13 May 2021, UEFA announced the final was relocated to the Estádio do Dragão in Porto, Portugal, [5] a country which was on the British "green list" for unrestricted travel during the pandemic. [17] Background [ edit ] Manchester City were playing in their first European Cup/UEFA Champions League final. They had previously played in one European final, the 1970 European Cup Winners' Cup Final, and won.

They became the ninth distinct English side to play in a European Cup/UEFA Champions League final. This was the third UEFA Champions League final for manager Pep Guardiola, and his first since the two wins with Barcelona in 2009 and 2011, both against Manchester United. [18] City were seeking to become the first club to win its first European Cup/UEFA Champions League final since Borussia Dortmund in 1997, which seven clubs had failed to do in between.

[19] Chelsea were playing in their third European Cup/UEFA Champions League final, and the first since their win in 2012 away against Bayern Munich. In addition, they had previously played in the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup and UEFA Europa League finals twice each – winning all. In addition, Chelsea became the first club ever to see its men's and women's teams reach the Champions League final in the same season, having qualified for the 2021 UEFA Women's Champions League Final as well.

Head coach Thomas Tuchel became the first manager to reach the European Cup/UEFA Champions League final in successive seasons with different clubs, having lost the 2020 final to Bayern Munich while coaching Paris Saint-Germain. [20] This was the third all-English final in the history of the competition, after 2008 in Moscow between Chelsea and Manchester United and 2019 in Madrid between Liverpool and Tottenham Hotspur.

This was also the third consecutive Champions League final to feature a first-time finalist, after Tottenham in 2019 and Paris Saint-Germain in 2020.

This was the third meeting between the teams in Europe, having previously met in the semi-finals of the 1970–71 European Cup Winners' Cup, where Chelsea won both legs 1–0 en route to their first European trophy.

It was also the second major cup final between them, after the 2019 EFL Cup Final, which City won on penalties following a goalless draw after extra time. The teams met twice during the season's Premier League, with each side winning away: City won the first match 3–1 at Stamford Bridge, while Chelsea won the second 2–1 at Etihad Stadium three weeks before the final. Three weeks before the second league encounter, Chelsea also beat City 1–0 in the FA Cup semi-finals, denying City the chance of winning an unprecedented quadruple.

[21] Road to the final [ edit ] Further information: 2020–21 UEFA Champions League Note: In all results below, the score of the finalist is given first (H: home; A: away). Manchester City Round Chelsea Opponent Result Group stage Opponent Result Porto 3–1 (H) Matchday 1 Sevilla 0–0 (H) Marseille 3–0 (A) Matchday 2 Krasnodar 4–0 (A) Olympiacos 3–0 (H) Matchday 3 Rennes 3–0 (H) Olympiacos 1–0 (A) Matchday 4 Rennes 2–1 (A) Porto 0–0 (A) Matchday 5 Sevilla 4–0 (A) Marseille 3–0 (H) Matchday 6 Krasnodar 1–1 (H) Group C winners Pos Team Source: UEFA Opponent Agg.

1st leg 2nd leg Knockout phase Opponent Agg. 1st leg 2nd leg Borussia Mönchengladbach 4–0 2–0 (A) [a] 2–0 (H) [a] Round of 16 Atlético Madrid 3–0 1–0 (A) [b] 2–0 (H) Borussia Dortmund 4–2 2–1 (H) 2–1 (A) Quarter-finals Porto 2–1 2–0 (A) [c] 0–1 (H) [c] Paris Saint-Germain 4–1 2–1 (A) 2–0 (H) Semi-finals Real Madrid 3–1 1–1 (A) 2–0 (H) Notes • ^ a b Both legs of Manchester City's round of 16 tie against Borussia Mönchengladbach were played in Budapest, Hungary due to travel restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic between Germany and the United Kingdom.

[22] [23] • ^ The first leg away of Chelsea's round of 16 tie against Atlético Madrid was played in Bucharest, Romania due to travel restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic from the United Kingdom to Spain. [22] • ^ a b Both legs of Chelsea's quarter-final tie against Porto were played in Seville, Spain due to travel restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic between Portugal and the Final champion 2021 Kingdom.

[24] Pre-match [ edit ] Officials [ edit ] Spaniard Antonio Mateu Lahoz (centre) officiated the final along with assistants Roberto Díaz Pérez del Palomar (left) and Pau Cebrián Devís (right). On 12 May 2021, UEFA named Spaniard Antonio Mateu Lahoz as the referee for the final. Mateu Lahoz had been a FIFA referee since 2011, and was previously the fourth official in the 2019 UEFA Champions League Final.

He officiated six prior matches in the 2020–21 Champions League season, with one match in the play-off round, four in the group stage and one quarter-final leg. He served as a referee at the 2018 FIFA Final champion 2021 Cup in Russia, and was selected as an official for Final champion 2021 Euro 2020. He was joined by six of his fellow countrymen, including assistant referees Pau Cebrián Devís and Roberto Díaz Pérez del Palomar.

Carlos del Cerro Grande served as the fourth official, while Alejandro Hernández Hernández acted as the video assistant referee. Juan Martínez Munuera and Íñigo Prieto López de Cerain were appointed as assistant VAR officials, along with Polish referee Paweł Gil. [2] Opening ceremony [ edit ] American DJ and electronic music producer Marshmello performed a virtual show for the opening ceremony before the match, along with Final champion 2021 Gomez and Khalid.

[25] Pulisic attack The match kicked off around 8 p.m. in front of a crowd of 14,110. In the fourth minute, Kai Havertz played the ball across the Manchester City penalty area but it was gathered by Ederson.

Five minutes later, a long kick from Ederson found Sterling, who controlled the ball and was about to shoot when he was dispossessed by Reece James. [27] : 11 Havertz then passed to Werner, who missed the ball from close range when attempting to shoot. In the 15th minute, Mason Mount passed to Werner, who shot straight at Ederson, before then seeing a subsequent strike tipped away for a corner. Ben Chilwell played in a cross to the far post but N'Golo Kante's header went over the Manchester City bar.

[27] : 10 In the 28th minute, Phil Foden was played in on goal and was about to shoot when Antonio Rüdiger tackled him. Two minutes later, Kyle Walker sent the ball across the Chelsea penalty area but it fizzed just out of Mahrez's reach.

With ten minutes of the half remaining, İlkay Gündoğan became the first player to be booked after a foul on Mount. [27] : 9 In the 38th minute, Kante played the ball to Havertz, who was denied a shooting opportunity by a tackle from Oleksandr Zinchenko.

A minute later, Chelsea were forced to make the first substitution of the match with the injured Thiago Silva being replaced by Andreas Christensen. Three minutes before half-time, Chelsea took the lead. Mount passed to Havertz, who went one-on-one with Ederson, and although the goalkeeper rushed out and deflected the ball away, Havertz passed it into an empty net to make it 1–0.

There were three minutes of stoppage time. [27] : 8 Neither side made any lineup changes during the interval. Manchester City dominated the early stages of the second half.

final champion 2021

{INSERTKEYS} [27] : 7 Twelve minutes into the half, Rüdiger was booked for a foul on City's Kevin De Bruyne, who was injured in the challenge, leaving the pitch due to the new concussion protocol, in tears, to be replaced by Gabriel Jesus. Two minutes later, Manchester City appealed for a penalty when the ball struck James on the arm in his own penalty area, but the VAR review decided against a foul, noting that the ball deflecting off James' chest first. In the 64th minute, Bernardo Silva was replaced by Fernandinho for Manchester City before Christian Pulisic came on for Werner for Chelsea.

[27] : 6 With 21 minutes remaining, City pressed for an equalizer. Mahrez's cross to Gündoğan was cleared by César Azpilicueta. Four minutes later, Pulisic flicked the ball to Havertz, who passed it back to Pulisic, but his attempted shot rolled just past the City goalpost.

In the 75th minute, Sterling passed to Jesus, but the ball was cleared by Chilwell. Manchester City made their third substitution when Sergio Agüero came on for Sterling. [27] : 5 Mateo Kovačić was brought on for Chelsea to replace Mount in the 80th minute, and five minutes later, Agüero attempted to find Foden with a lofted cross to the far post, but the ball was easily caught by Édouard Mendy in the Chelsea goal.

A minute later, Walker played a cross-field out-swinging pass which narrowly missed both Agüero and Foden. Two minutes from the end of the match, Jesus was booked for a foul on Havertz before Christensen made a block to maintain his side's lead. At the end of regular time, the fourth official displayed that a minimum of seven minutes of stoppage would be played. [27] : 4 In the final minute, Mahrez's half-volley from the edge of the Chelsea penalty area went just over the crossbar, and the match was brought to an end with Chelsea winning 1–0.

[27] : 3 Details [ edit ] A "home" team was determined, for "administrative purposes," [note 1] through a special draw held on 19 March 2021, [28] after the quarter-final and semi-final draws. Chelsea [4] GK 31 Ederson RB 2 Kyle Walker CB 5 John Stones CB 3 Rúben Dias LB 11 Oleksandr Zinchenko CM 20 Bernardo Silva 64 ' CM 8 İlkay Gündoğan 35 ' CM 47 Phil Foden AM 17 Kevin De Bruyne ( c) 60 ' CF 26 Riyad Mahrez CF 7 Raheem Sterling 77 ' Substitutes: GK 13 Zack Steffen GK 33 Scott Carson DF 6 Nathan Aké DF 14 Aymeric Laporte DF 22 Benjamin Mendy DF 27 João Cancelo DF 50 Eric García MF 16 Rodri MF 25 Fernandinho 64 ' FW 9 Gabriel Jesus 88 ' 60 ' FW 10 Sergio Agüero 77 ' FW 21 Ferran Torres Manager: Pep Guardiola GK 16 Édouard Mendy CB 28 César Azpilicueta ( c) CB 6 Thiago Silva 39 ' CB 2 Antonio Rüdiger 57 ' RWB 24 Reece James LWB 21 Ben Chilwell CM 5 Jorginho CM 7 N'Golo Kanté AM 29 Kai Havertz AM 19 Mason Mount 80 ' CF 11 Timo Werner 66 ' Substitutes: GK 1 Kepa Arrizabalaga GK 13 Willy Caballero DF 3 Marcos Alonso DF 4 Andreas Christensen 39 ' DF 15 Kurt Zouma DF 33 Emerson MF 10 Christian Pulisic 66 ' MF 17 Mateo Kovačić 80 ' MF 20 Callum Hudson-Odoi MF 22 Hakim Ziyech MF 23 Billy Gilmour FW 18 Olivier Giroud Manager: Thomas Tuchel Man of the Match: N'Golo Kanté (Chelsea) [1] Assistant referees: [2] Pau Cebrián Devís ( Spain) Roberto Díaz Pérez del Palomar ( Spain) Fourth official: [2] Carlos del Cerro Grande ( Spain) Video assistant referee: [2] Alejandro Hernández Hernández ( Spain) Assistant video assistant referees: [2] Juan Martínez Munuera ( Spain) Íñigo Prieto López de Cerain ( Spain) Paweł Gil ( Poland) Match rules [29] [30] • 90 minutes • 30 minutes of extra time if necessary • Penalty shoot-out if scores still level • Twelve named substitutes • Maximum of five substitutions, with a sixth allowed in extra time [note 2] Statistics [ edit ] First half [31] Statistic Manchester City Chelsea Goals scored 0 1 Total shots 3 5 Shots on target 1 2 Saves 1 1 Ball possession 53% 47% Corner kicks 1 1 Fouls committed 7 6 Offsides 1 2 Yellow cards 1 0 Red cards 0 0 Second half [31] Statistic Manchester City Chelsea Goals scored 0 0 Total shots 4 3 Shots on target 0 0 Saves 0 0 Ball possession 64% 36% Corner kicks 2 0 Fouls committed 7 7 Offsides 0 1 Yellow cards 1 1 Red cards 0 0 Overall [31] Statistic Manchester City Chelsea Goals scored 0 1 Total shots 7 8 Shots on target 1 2 Saves 1 1 Ball possession 58% 42% Corner kicks 3 1 Fouls committed 14 13 Offsides 1 3 Yellow cards 2 1 Red cards 0 0 See also [ edit ] • 2021 UEFA Europa League Final • 2021 UEFA Women's Champions League Final • 2021 UEFA Super Cup • Chelsea F.C.

in international football • English football clubs in international competitions • List of football matches between British clubs in UEFA competitions • Manchester City F.C. in international football Notes [ edit ] • ^ Each of the two finalists is able to wear their first-choice colours. If, however, there is a clash of colours that necessitates a kit change from one club, then the club designated as "the away side" must use an alternative kit.

In the actual 2021 final, both teams wore their first-choice colours. • ^ Each team was given only three opportunities to make substitutions, with a fourth opportunity in extra time, excluding substitutions made at half-time, before the start of extra time and at half-time in extra time. References [ edit ] • ^ a b "Champions League final Player of the Match: N'Golo Kanté".

UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 29 May 2021. Archived from the original on 30 May 2021 . Retrieved 29 May 2021. • ^ a b c d e f "Referee teams appointed for UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League finals".

UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 12 May 2021. Archived from the original on 12 May 2021 . Retrieved 12 May 2021. • ^ a b "Full Time Report Final – Manchester City v Chelsea" (PDF).

UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 29 May 2021. Archived (PDF) from the original on 31 May 2021 . Retrieved 29 May 2021. {/INSERTKEYS}

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• ^ a b c "Tactical Line-ups – Final – Saturday 29 May 2021" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 29 May 2021. Archived (PDF) from the original on 29 May 2021. Retrieved 29 May 2021. • ^ a b c "UEFA Champions League final to move to Portugal to allow 6,000 fans of each team to attend". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 13 May 2021. Archived from the original on 13 May 2021.

Retrieved 13 May 2021. • ^ a b "UEFA competitions to resume in August". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 17 June 2020. Archived from the original on 25 August 2020. Retrieved 17 June 2020. • ^ UEFA.com (29 May 2021). "2021 Champions League final: all you need to know". UEFA.com. Retrieved 5 May 2022. • ^ "Man. City 0–1 Chelsea: Havertz gives Blues second Champions League triumph".

final champion 2021

UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 29 May 2021. Retrieved 29 May 2021. • ^ "European Champion Clubs' Cup – History: Finals" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 2012. Archived (PDF) from the original on 30 December 2017 .

final champion 2021

Retrieved 19 August 2020. • ^ "Six associations interested in hosting 2020 club finals". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 3 November 2017. Archived from the original on 26 August final champion 2021.

Retrieved 17 June 2020. • ^ "UEFA Executive Committee agenda for Kyiv meeting". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 8 May 2018.

Archived from the original on 17 June 2020. Retrieved 17 June 2020. • ^ "Istanbul to host 2020 UEFA Champions League Final". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations.

24 May 2018. Archived from the original on 15 July 2018. Retrieved 24 May 2018. • ^ "Istanbul to host 2020 UEFA Champions League final".

UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 24 May 2018. Archived from the original on 9 October 2019. Retrieved 17 June 2020. • ^ Dorsett, Rob (6 May 2021). "Champions League: Aston Villa to offer Villa Park for Manchester City v Chelsea final". Sky Final champion 2021. Archived from the original on 6 May 2021. Retrieved 6 May 2021. • ^ "Fans shouldn't travel to Turkey – Shapps". BBC Sport. 7 May 2021. Archived from the original on 11 May 2021. Retrieved 29 May 2021.

• ^ Gardner, Jamie (10 May 2021). "Champions League final set to be moved from Istanbul to London". www.independent.co.uk. Independent Digital News & Media Limited. Archived from the original on 2 June 2021. Retrieved 29 May 2021. • ^ a b Gardner, Jamie (19 May 2021). "Uefa 'strongly recommends' Man City and Chelsea fans travel on official club trips for Champions League final".

www.independent.co.uk. Independent Digital News & Media Limited. Archived from the original on 2 June 2021. Retrieved 29 May 2021. • ^ McNulty, Phil (4 May 2021). "Man City 2–0 Paris St-Germain (4–1 on aggregate): City into first Champions League final".

BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 6 May 2021. Retrieved 7 May 2021. • ^ "2021 UEFA Champions League Final Press Kit" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 29 May 2021.

final champion 2021

Archived (PDF) from the original on 30 May 2021. Retrieved 2 June 2021. • ^ McNulty, Phil (5 May 2021). "Chelsea 2–0 Real Madrid (agg 3–1): Thomas Tuchel's side set up all-English Champions League final". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 7 May 2021.

Final champion 2021 7 May 2021. • ^ "Chelsea football club: record v Manchester City". 11v11.com. Archived from the original on 16 February 2021.

Retrieved 7 May 2021. • ^ a b "UEFA Final champion 2021 League venue changes". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 10 February 2021. Archived from the original on 6 May 2021. Retrieved 10 February 2021. • ^ "Manchester City vs Borussia Mönchengladbach venue change confirmed".

UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 10 March 2021. Archived from the original on 6 May 2021.

Retrieved 10 March 2021. • ^ "Porto vs Chelsea games to be played in Seville". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 30 March 2021. Archived from the original on 5 May 2021. Retrieved 30 March 2021. • ^ "Marshmello to headline 2021 UEFA Champions League final opening ceremony, presented by Pepsi®".

final champion 2021

UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 18 May 2021. Archived from the original on 18 May 2021. Retrieved 18 May 2021. • ^ "Marshmello's UEFA Champions League Final 2020/21 Full Opening Ceremony Performance".

• ^ a b c d e f g h i " 'Tuchel is a magician' – reaction as Chelsea win Champions League final". BBC Sport. 29 May 2021. Archived from the original on 3 June 2021. Retrieved 30 May 2021. • ^ "UEFA Champions League quarter-final and semi-final draws". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 29 May 2021. Archived from the original on 29 May 2021. Retrieved 31 May 2021.

• ^ "Regulations of the UEFA Champions League, 2020/21". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 3 August 2020. Archived from the original on 9 September 2020. Retrieved 25 August 2020. • ^ "Two triple-headers approved for 2021 March and September national team windows". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 24 September 2020.

Archived from the original on 25 Final champion 2021 2020. Retrieved 24 September 2020. • ^ a b c "Team statistics" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 29 May 2021. Archived (PDF) from the original on 29 May 2021. Retrieved 29 May 2021. External links [ edit ] • Official website Wikimedia Commons has media related to UEFA Champions League Final 2021. • 1955–56 • 1956–57 • 1957–58 • 1958–59 • 1959–60 • 1960–61 • 1961–62 • 1962–63 • 1963–64 • 1964–65 • 1965–66 • 1966–67 • 1967–68 • 1968–69 • 1969–70 • 1970–71 • 1971–72 • 1972–73 • 1973–74 • 1974–75 • 1975–76 • 1976–77 • 1977–78 • 1978–79 • 1979–80 • 1980–81 • 1981–82 • 1982–83 • 1983–84 • 1984–85 • 1985–86 • 1986–87 • 1987–88 • 1988–89 • 1989–90 • 1990–91 • 1991–92 Finals • 1992–93 • 1993–94 • 1994–95 • 1995–96 • 1996–97 • 1997–98 • 1998–99 • 1999–00 • 2000–01 • 2001–02 • 2002–03 • 2003–04 • 2004–05 • 2005–06 • 2006–07 • final champion 2021 • 2008–09 • 2009–10 • 2010–11 • 2011–12 • 2012–13 • 2013–14 • 2014–15 • 2015–16 • 2016–17 • 2017–18 • 2018–19 • 2019–20 • 2020–21 • 2021–22 • 2022–23 • 2023–24 Final champion 2021 • Albania • Andorra • Armenia • Austria • Azerbaijan • Belarus '20 '21 • Belgium • Bosnia and Herzegovina • Bulgaria • Croatia • Cyprus • Czech Republic • Denmark • England • Estonia '20 '21 • Faroe Final champion 2021 '20 '21 • Finland '20 '21 • France • Georgia '20 '21 • Germany • Gibraltar • Greece • Hungary • Iceland '20 '21 • Israel • Italy • Kazakhstan '20 '21 • Kosovo • Latvia '20 '21 • Lithuania '20 '21 • Luxembourg • Malta • Moldova • Montenegro • Netherlands • North Macedonia • Northern Ireland • Norway '20 '21 • Poland • Portugal • Republic of Ireland '20 '21 • Romania • Russia • San Marino • Scotland • Serbia • Slovakia • Slovenia • Spain • Sweden '20 '21 • Switzerland • Turkey • Ukraine • Wales Domestic cups • Albania • Andorra • Armenia • Austria • Azerbaijan • Belarus • Belgium • Bosnia and Herzegovina • Bulgaria • Croatia • Cyprus • Czech Republic • Denmark • England • Estonia • Faroe Islands '20 '21 • Finland '20 '21 • France • Georgia '20 '21 • Germany • Gibraltar • Greece • Hungary • Iceland '20 '21 • Israel • Italy • Kazakhstan '21 • Kosovo • Latvia '20 '21 • Liechtenstein • Lithuania '20 '21 • Luxembourg • Malta • Moldova • Montenegro • Netherlands • North Macedonia • Northern Ireland • Norway '20 • Poland • Portugal • Republic of Ireland '20 '21 • Romania • Russia • San Marino • Scotland '19–'20 '20–'21 • Serbia • Slovakia • Slovenia • Spain '19–'20 '20–'21 • Sweden • Switzerland • Turkey • Ukraine • Wales League cups • Albania • Andorra • Armenia • Azerbaijan • Belarus • Belgium • Bulgaria • Croatia • Cyprus • England • Estonia • Faroe Islands • France • Georgia • Germany • Iceland • Israel • Italy • Kazakhstan • Kosovo • Lithuania • Malta • Netherlands • Northern Ireland • Poland • Portugal • Republic of Ireland '20 '21 • Romania • Russia • San Marino • Spain • Turkey • Ukraine UEFA competitions • العربية • Беларуская (тарашкевіца) • Български • Dansk • Deutsch • Español • فارسی • Français • 한국어 • Հայերեն • Hrvatski • Bahasa Indonesia • Italiano • עברית • Қазақша • Latviešu • Magyar • Bahasa Melayu • Nederlands • नेपाली • 日本語 • Norsk bokmål • Português • Română • Русский • Simple English • Српски / srpski • ไทย • Türkçe • Українська • Tiếng Việt • 中文 Edit links • This page was last edited on 7 May 2022, at 00:45 (UTC).

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• Privacy policy • About Wikipedia • Disclaimers • Contact Wikipedia • Mobile view • Developers • Statistics • Cookie statement • •• Clubs • UEFA Champions League • UEFA Europa League • UEFA Europa Conference League • UEFA Super Cup • UEFA Youth League • National • European Qualifiers • UEFA EURO 2024 • UEFA Nations League • Final champion 2021 • Under-21 • Youth & Amateur • Under-19 • Under-17 • UEFA Regions' Cup • Women • UEFA Women's EURO • FIFA Women's World Cup • UEFA Women's Champions League • Women's Under-19 • Women's Under-17 • Futsal • Futsal EURO final champion 2021 FIFA Futsal World Cup • Futsal Champions League • UEFA Women's Futsal EURO • Under-19 Futsal EURO Who is playing in the final?

Six-time winners Liverpool meet 13-time champions Real Madrid in a repeat of the 1981 and 2018 showpieces. The Reds beat Villarreal 5-2 on aggregate in the semi-finals, while Madrid prevailed 6-5 against Manchester City in an astonishing tie.

When is the 2022 Champions League final and what's the kick-off time? The game will be played on Saturday 28 May, kicking off at 21:00 CEST. • Watch Champions League goals and highlights • Where to watch the Champions League Where does the 2022 Champions League final take place? Saint-Denis's Stade de France will host the final. Located just north of Paris, it has a capacity of over 80,000, making it one of the biggest stadiums in Europe. France's previous Final champion 2021 Cup finals 1956 Real Madrid 4-3 Reims (Parc des Princes, Paris) 1975 Bayern 2-0 Leeds (Parc des Princes, Paris) 1981 Liverpool 1-0 Real Madrid (Parc des Princes, Paris) 2000 Real Madrid 3-0 Valencia (Stade de France, Saint-Denis) 2006 Barcelona 2-1 Arsenal (Stade de France, Saint-Denis) Built to stage games at the 1998 FIFA World Cup, the Final champion 2021 de France is the home of the national football and rugby union sides.

The first game played at the venue was a friendly between France and Spain on 28 January 1998, with Zinédine Zidane scoring the only goal in a 1-0 home win. 2000 final highlights: Real Madrid 3-0 Valencia Les Bleus beat Brazil 3-0 at Stade de France in the 1998 World Cup final, and the arena was the focus of the footballing world's attention again in 2000, when Real Madrid beat Valencia 3-0 in the UEFA Champions League final thanks to goals from Fernando Morientes, Steve McManaman and Raúl González.

The final of UEFA EURO 2016 also took place at the Stade de France, the home side losing 1-0 to Éder's extra-time goal for Portugal. How do I get tickets for the 2022 Champions League final? A total of 52,000 tickets out of 75,000 (the stadium's capacity for the final) are available for fans and the general public to purchase. The two finalists receive 20,000 each, while 12,000 final champion 2021 were offered for sale to fans worldwide via UEFA.com (the window for this closed on Thursday 28 April).

Discounts will be applied to all category 3 and category 4 tickets for the two clubs, following a request to change the allocation system made by the semi-finalists. Win Champions League final tickets What's the format of the Champions League final? Great Champions League final goals If the score is equal at the end of normal time, two 15-minute periods of extra time are played. If one of the teams scores more goals than the other during extra time, that team are declared the winners.

If the score is still equal after extra time, the winners are determined by kicks from the penalty mark. • Who has won most Champions League titles? • Champions League all-time stats and records How can I watch the 2022 Champions League final?

The full list of global UEFA Champions League broadcast partners is available here. What do the Champions League winners get? The UEFA Champions League trophy stands 73.5cm tall and weighs 7.5kg. "It may not be an artistic masterpiece but everybody in football is keen to get their hands on it," said creator Jürg Stadelmann. The magic of the UEFA Champions League trophy The winning team are presented with 40 gold medals and the runners-up with 40 silver medals.

Additional medals may not be produced. The winners are also assured of a place in the 2022/23 UEFA Champions League group stage, if they have not qualified via their domestic competition.

Who are the 'home' team for the 2022 Champions League final? The 'home' team for the showpiece will be Liverpool, after a draw made for administrative purposes on 18 March determined it would be the winners of semi-final 2.

Which kits will the teams wear in the Champions League final? Both finalists may wear their first-choice colours but if there is a clash, the club designated as the away team must use an alternative kit.

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Marshmello x 2021 UEFA Champions League Final Opening Ceremony presented by Pepsi #UCLFinal




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