Valve steam deck

valve steam deck

Can you fit a PC in your pocket? Not unless you have exceptionally large pockets, you can't. Valve hopes to change that with the Steam Deck, a handheld PC that should fit inside at least a generously sized jacket pocket. The first wave of these compact computers have now been released for purchase, though it's not quite as straightforward as heading to your local electronics store to buy one. As the past few years of PC gaming hardware releases have taught us, nothing is ever that simple.

Though, Valve is making an attempt at a more orderly ordering system for the Steam Deck than much of the chaos we've seen the past year. It should result in a smooth, if a little long-winded, release for the handheld console.

Is the Steam Deck out now? Valve released valve steam deck Steam Deck's initial wave on February 25, 2022. What that means is that those first in line for a Steam Deck (that signed up last summer) will receive an email allowing them to place an order for the handheld PC on that date. They will have 72 hours to complete their purchase, otherwise that ticket is sent to the next person in the queue and they lose their chance. After that time, we have very rough estimates as to when the next Steam Deck shipments will be.

At least one in Q2, 2022, and then an unknown quantity valve steam deck. We also don't know if Valve plans to gradually release Steam Decks during each period, or whether the initial restock will be our lot.

valve steam deck

How do I make a reservation for a Steam Deck? Just head over to the Steam Deck product page, log in, and grab a reservation. They're $5 (£4), but that comes off the total of the Steam Deck if you buy one. Or is refunded if you change your mind. Just note that the Steam Deck is not available worldwide, only set regions.

These are the US, UK, Canada, and EU. Valve would like to expand this availability, we've been told, but perhaps it will wait until supply levels out somewhat before doing that. If I pre-order a Steam Deck today, when will I receive it? Pre-orders placed today may differ depending on your location as time goes on, though it appears expected order availability will be sometime after Q2 2022 no matter where in the world you are.

Expected Steam Deck order availability by region: • US: After Q2 2022 • Canada: After Q2 2022 • UK: After Q2 2022 • Germany: After Q2 2022 • France: After Q2 2022 Polling the PC Gamer staff that pre-ordered on the same day pre-orders went live: some have expected availability in Q2 2022, while others are after Q2 2022.

No exact dates are given beyond these rough estimates. What that means is that we know there will be at least one wave of Steam Decks on sale in February, Q1 for the people who valve steam deck and another sometime between April–June, Q2. After that, there will be a further shipment, likely in the second half of the year, though when exactly is not clear. The fact that many of us who pre-ordered on the first day also have the same order availability as what's currently listed on the Steam Deck pre-order page is interesting in itself.

It could be that the expected availability is so distant that Valve would rather not say when these units may arrive, or that it isn't able to say what availability will valve steam deck like later in the year. I'd say that may have something to do with the global semiconductor shortage, for one, as late 2022 may see some, perhaps minor, improvement in supply.

Semiconductor supply is expected to increase in late 2022/2023, after which point there may not be such a delay on Steam Deck orders as there is today. (Image credit: Valve) How do I check my Steam Deck delivery date?

You can check expected order availability on the Steam Store's Steam Deck product page. Just don't hit the cancel button, yeah?

valve steam deck

Has the Steam Deck been delayed? Valve delayed the first wave of Steam Deck devices from December 2021 to February 2022.

So far there have been no further delays to the handheld PC, and the February release is full steam ahead today. That said, we're keeping an eye on the Q2 2022 order availability dates in case they change.

We can't say for sure if Valve has pushed back, or even brought forward, the availability dates beyond Q2 2022, as no specific date has been given. (Image credit: Valve) Will I be able to purchase a Steam Deck from anywhere else but Steam? The only place to secure a Steam Deck pre-order is via Valve directly and the Steam Deck product page. Valve's track record with its own hardware launches would also suggest this will remain the case for most of valve steam deck Steam Deck's lifetime.

The Valve steam deck Index is only available to purchase through Valve directly. The Steam Controller and Steam Link, while now six-feet under, were also primarily purchased direct from Steam during their lifetimes. Valve has alluded to one-day there being general availability of the Steam Deck to purchase. You can sign up for a heads-up on that if you add it to your wishlist. Though with the queue going back potentially into 2023, it might be a while before that happens.

If ever. Who knows if you'll even want a Steam Deck by then. (Image credit: Valve) What about the second-hand market? I have very little doubt that, come launch day, there will be heaps of Steam Decks available on auction and reseller sites.

I would also assume these will come with massively inflated price tags. While I can't make a blanket statement for every second-hand Steam Deck, I would suggest caution in overpaying for the device to get your hands on one. The Steam Deck's most impressive feature is its price tag, which is far below its competitors in the handheld PC gaming space. If you're looking to spend $1,000 or more on a Steam Deck second-hand, you could spend that money on a brand new portable PC from Onexplayer or Aya instead.

Or, even better, put that money to better use on a tried-and-tested gaming laptop with a discrete GPU and power to play the latest games. Has anyone got their hands on a Steam Deck already? We have! You can see what Wes makes of it in his full Steam Deck review. We've also had plenty of hands on a couple of devices to make sure we can give you the full breadth of information required to make your mind up about buying one or not.

That includes playing Elden Ring on the Steam Deck and enjoying PC gaming down at our local bar, for science. (Image credit: Valve) When will the Steam Deck dock arrive? Valve has confirmed that a USB Type-C hub will arrive " late spring." That's a little delayed from what Valve was hoping for, apparently.

We know this will be a powered USB-Type C dock with the valve steam deck to connect your Steam Deck valve steam deck a monitor for bigger-screen gaming, and come with DisplayPort and HDMI output, an Ethernet adapter, and three USB inputs.

That's it, pictured above. We've also found some third-party docks today work great for this, but not necessarily all of them. One we have used and know works is the Sabrent Multi-Port USB Type-C Hub With 4k HDMI, which we've spotted on Amazon US and Amazon UK going pretty cheap. Jacob Ridley • Senior Hardware Editor Jacob earned his first byline writing for his own tech blog from his hometown in Wales in 2017.

From there, he graduated to professionally breaking things as hardware writer at PCGamesN, where he would later win command of the kit cupboard as hardware editor. Nowadays, as senior hardware editor at PC Gamer, he spends his days reporting on the latest developments in the technology and gaming industry. When he's not writing about GPUs and CPUs, however, you'll find him trying to get as far away from the modern world as possible by wild camping.

PC Valve steam deck is part of Future US Inc, valve steam deck international media group and leading digital publisher. Visit our corporate site. • About Us • Terms and conditions • Privacy policy • Cookies policy • Advertise with us • Accessibility Statement • Careers © Future US, Inc. Full 7th Floor, 130 West 42nd Street, New York, NY 10036. English Español - España (Spanish - Spain) Français (French) Deutsch (German) Italiano (Italian) 日本語 (Japanese) 繁體中文 (Traditional Chinese) Русский (Russian) Português - Brasil (Portuguese - Brazil) Български (Bulgarian) Español - Latinoamérica (Spanish - Latin America) 简体中文 (Simplified Chinese) Čeština (Czech) Dansk (Danish) Nederlands (Dutch) Suomi (Finnish) Ελληνικά (Greek) Magyar (Hungarian) Norsk (Norwegian) Polski (Polish) Português (Portuguese) Română (Romanian) Svenska (Swedish) ไทย (Thai) Türkçe (Turkish) Українська (Ukrainian) Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) Cancel [esc]
Cookie banner We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audiences come from.

To learn more or opt-out, read our Cookie Policy. Please also read our Privacy Notice and Terms of Use, which became effective December 20, 2019. By choosing I Accept, you consent to our use of cookies and other tracking technologies. Related Steam Deck, one month later Of course, Valve isn’t stocking this $400 handheld gaming PC at Best Buy.

The maker of Half-Life and Portal is trickling it out directly to devout fans of Steam, the platform that pioneered the idea of selling “early access” games before they’re actually complete. Remember when Valve let an unknown developer sell a broken, buggy game called PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds in early access? It changed the world. The bugs didn’t outweigh the fact that its unproven formula was uniquely fun — to the point that PUBG, its clones, and the games it inspired (including Fortnite, Call of Duty: Warzone, and Apex Legends) rank among the most popular titles around the globe.

The Valve steam deck Deck has a unique formula, too. It’s a Linux computer that plays Windows games like a Nintendo Switch with unheard-of bang for the buck. And just like PUBG, a game I played for 452 hours despite glitches, I can’t get enough.

Welcome to the early access game console. There will be bugs.

valve steam deck

Buy for $399.00 from Steam Let’s get one thing out of the way: it’s easy to look at pictures of the Steam Deck, see a Nintendo Switch, and imagine yourself magically playing a gigantic library of PC games that “just work” without messing with graphics settings or controls. That’s not the Steam Deck that exists today — and not just because the Steam Deck is an absolute chonk that can practically fit a Switch between its grips. (It reminded me a little of Darth Vader’s Star Destroyer swallowing Princess Leia’s Tantive IV.) Valve steam deck, today’s Steam Deck expects you to tweak more and forgive more than your average PC, not less.

But for me, the magic of Steam Deck is this: it makes PC gaming truly portable for the first time ever. Valve Steam Deck specs • 7-inch, 60Hz, 1280 x 800 IPS screen with 400-nit brightness • 4-core, 8-thread AMD Zen 2 CPU • 8-core AMD RDNA 2 graphics, 1GB video memory • 16GB LPDDR5 memory, 8GB accessible by GPU • 64GB eMMC storage ($400), 256GB NVMe SSD ($530), or 512GB NVMe SSD ($650) • 40Wh battery • USB-C port with USB 3.2 Gen 2 data, DisplayPort 1.4 video out, USB-C PD charging • Dual-band Wi-Fi 5 (2x2), Bluetooth 5.0, UHS-I microSD reader • 3.5mm headphone jack • 1.47 pounds (669g) • 11.7 x 4.6 x 1.9 inches (298 x 117 x 49mm) What do I mean?

Last year, I borrowed a then-state-of-the-art Aya Neo handheld gaming PC and managed to play through Persona 4 Golden on that $800-and-up Windows machine.

But it never quite felt like PC gaming to me. I could barely navigate the OS with its joysticks and touchscreen, there wasn’t enough performance to competently play even moderately demanding games like Outer Wilds and Valheim, there were no precision controls for shooting or point-and-click titles, and there was no point in bothering with anything but the lowest graphical settings.

(There was also no way to quickly and reliably suspend the system without losing progress.) The Steam Deck turns all that on its head. Starting at just $400, its valve steam deck AMD chip with RDNA 2 graphics instantly outstrips every boutique portable gaming PC on the market.

valve steam deck

While you might still struggle with the very latest titles, it’s got enough oomph that I’m playing Control and the Resident Evil 2 remake at a smooth 60 frames per second outside of big fights, and I can even turn the graphics up if I’m willing to accept 30fps instead.

Older or less demanding games can easily run on their highest settings, like Max Payne 3 or Mirror’s Edge. And if the game you’re playing really doesn’t need the juice — say Hotline Miami or Nidhogg — you can throttle the frame rate, GPU clockspeed, or even the processor wattage to prolong valve steam deck Deck’s battery life.

It only takes three taps, and the awesome open-source MangoHud overlay, with Valve’s Gamescope, give you instant feedback on your frame rate, clockspeeds, frame times, even how quickly you’re draining valve steam deck battery and how long it’s likely to last.

The joysticks are just slightly taller than I’d like, but they feel great and keep my palms from accidentally brushing the valve steam deck. Okay, you might ask, but all the games I just named have gamepad support — what about the decades of mouse-and-keyboard fare?

The Steam Deck lets you borrow or build a dizzying array of custom control schemes that make them feel at home, too. In addition to providing an entire traditional gamepad worth of analog joysticks, triggers, and face buttons — almost all of which feel fantastic, I might add — you also get four rear grip buttons and a pair of Steam Controller pads so customizable, calling them “trackpads” feels like a disservice.

You can click, swipe, valve steam deck, and “spin” a virtual trackball; press down on their pressure-sensitive surfaces; and even set their edges to continually move or turn your character. and every one of the Deck’s 20-plus programmable controls can issue multiple different commands depending on how and when you press. You can build macros and chorded combinations with other keys and per-key turbo modes, and like I said, it’s dizzying — and Valve barely explains how any of it works.

.versus basic tweaks I wouldn’t be surprised if you’re thinking, “Uh, wasn’t the Steam Controller a flop?” But I’m here to tell you not only did it have an amazing cult following, the Deck makes it work. The fancy touchpads no longer get in your way if you’re not interested, and you can now get precision aiming without relying on them one bit: just rest your thumb on the thumbstick to activate a gyro so you can tilt the Deck to easily zero in on your target.

And while you have the option of spending hours designing the perfect multi-layered control scheme, Valve makes it easy to add that gyro or a few extra grip buttons and go on with your day.

valve steam deck

With Control, I did both, instantly making myself a crack shot with the railgun revolver while binding back buttons to let me fly into the air and summon a shield of debris without ever taking my thumbs off the all-important sticks.

With Slay the Spire and Into the Breach, I simply reduced the “friction” on the virtual trackball so I could easily fling the 2D mouse cursor around. For many games, Valve steam deck often found that a Steam Controller cultist had already uploaded a great controller scheme — I love what Runic did with Torchlight II — and it’s a cinch to take any profile you see, remix it, and share it with the community.

Still, I’m not going to tell you that the Steam Controller is better than my 20 years of muscle memory with a mouse and keyboard, or necessarily a fit for every game. While I’m sure you might be able to swing a mean sword in Mordhau with the right tweaks, the full-forearm motion of a mouse just feels right to me.

The screen and speakers are remarkably good for a device that starts at $400. Crisp and clear. For me, the best part of the Deck is how you can suspend the entire SteamOS session, at any moment, without needing to pause or save.

I was about to run out of battery in the middle of a boss fight against a nasty dark demon in Control, but I never lost my place.

I hit the power button, and though it took an entire hour for me to get back to a charger, I was able to fire it right back up again and keep on playing. With 25 percent battery remaining, Fallout 4 is drawing 22.6 watts, giving me, at most, 28 minutes before I need to plug in. or I can extend it by throttling frame rate.

Speaking of the battery: it’s a weak spot, but it’s not as bad as I feared. I got just under two hours of Control on the Deck at 60fps and around 60 percent brightness, but nearly four hours when I set it to 30fps or in moderately less intensive games. And I never had to wonder how much time I had left or how to extend that battery life because the Deck can instantly report its own total power draw: if you see 20W in MangoHud/Gamescope, you know you’ll get roughly two hours out of the Deck’s 40Wh pack.

Control drew 12 watts at 30fps, Max Payne 2 drew 10W at 60fps, and Nidhogg drew only 6W. Not all games fit that formula, though; I saw Resident Evil 2 pulling over 20W at 30fps, and many games crossed valve steam deck 24W mark at 60fps.

You should know that downloading games at high speed dramatically stresses the system, too, drawing just as much electricity and causing stutter when I tried to play Call of Juarez simultaneously. Technically, I tested the $650 model with 512GB of fast storage, an etched anti-glare screen, and a premium case.

The anti-glare works, though I don’t have the glossy screen to compare to, and this version doesn’t easily let go of fingerprints. Those sessions were generally long valve steam deck to satisfy me, though I’m the kind of guy who’s never far from a high-wattage USB-C PD battery. I’ll also point out that the original Nintendo Switch wasn’t dramatically held back by the fact that it only got 2.5 hours of Breath of the Wild on a charge.

But I worry about what happens after a year or two as the battery ages, particularly since iFixit shows it’s not easy to remove. Valve’s Lawrence Yang tells me the battery will be one of the replacement parts on offer, though, and it does take pains to protect it while charging. I never saw the system draw more than 30 watts unless I was playing a game, it dropped to half-speed when it got three-quarters of the way, it trickle-charges the last 10 percent or so, valve steam deck the last 4 percent took 15 whole minutes to complete.

The whole charge takes 2 hours and 45 minutes, and it won’t keep charging forever on the plug: Valve lets it drain to 95 percent after “a long period of time.” What doesn’t satisfy me is the Steam Deck’s fan.

It never stops whining, the ramp-up can be jarring, and while Valve’s designers tell me they’re still optimizing the curve and improving the ramp rate, they say “high end games that max out the APU will likely not see a ton of improvement.” On the plus side, the fan does the job: I never saw the Deck throttle or felt the Deck’s grips or controls get hot. I think the screen has too much bezel, and the “Steam” menu button could use a tactile press. When the Steam Deck works, I finally feel like I can take PC gaming with me.

I fire up the new God of War or XCOM valve steam deck or Streets of Rage 4, let my fingers melt into the fantastic controls, feel the rousing music come out of the truly excellent stereo speakers, watch smooth gameplay on the remarkably good 7-inch 1280 x 800 screen, and sigh with delight — knowing I can get through my long-neglected PC games one bite-size session at a time.

But the operative word is “when.” Because the Steam Deck’s software is coming in hotter than any gadget I’ve ever tested — every single day I used the Steam Deck, I was dodging error messages, bugs, crashes, black screens, UI glitches, regressions, even entire feature changes from Valve on the eve of release. Hold power button, enter desktop mode While Valve’s docking station and app shortcuts aren’t making launch day, it’s still a full computer with a USB-C port that supports peripherals and displays, and I put some of that to the test.

I hooked up my own USB-C hub, monitor, mouse, keyboard, external drive, SD cards, and USB-C PD power adapters and took the full Linux desktop for a spin — and as long as I didn’t try to do anything too fancy, everything worked.

By everything, I mean I installed the Dolphin emulator and got Metroid Prime running perfectly on the Steam Deck (60fps at upscaled 720p resolution with anti-aliasing!) — with the caveat that I couldn’t disconnect the external mouse and keyboard until after I launched the game. I downloaded Chrome and Slack and Discord and worked from the Steam Deck, writing this entire post for The Verge.

I watched some Netflix and YouTube to give myself a break. And then, I fired up the desktop version of Steam and added Dolphin, Chrome, and Discord as shortcuts so I could launch them via SteamOS as well, building specific profiles in the Chrome web browser for Stadia and Netflix so I wouldn’t have to rely too much on SteamOS’s lackluster but handsome touchscreen keyboard.

Back in SteamOS is where I started to run into issues: the Chrome browser wouldn’t launch fullscreen unless I tricked it using a Netflix or YouTube toggle, Dolphin wouldn’t let me see menus, and Discord wouldn’t properly detect my microphone. SteamOS also only seems to detect the Deck’s directly connected SD card, even when I valve steam deck two extras mounted on the desktop.

But I did manage to get Destiny 2 running on Stadia that way and was surprised how well it can fit the Steam Deck’s screen and emulated keyboard / mouse controls.

I won’t mince words: I’m a Linux n00b, and I haven’t yet been able to get the Epic Games Store up and running to see if I can force its games through Proton as well. (Too many dependencies, not enough sudo perhaps?) But I did install some native Linux games from GOG and the Humble Bundle with only moderate success: Full Throttle Remastered wouldn’t play audio, and Cave Story+ didn’t recognize the Deck controls.

If you do know Linux, you should know that anything beyond flatpak apps are at-your-own-risk, and “anything you install outside of flatpak (via pacman for instance) may be wiped with the next SteamOS update.” I lost track of how many times I had to reboot the system or reconnect a device because Bluetooth or Wi-Fi or an SD card stopped working as expected.

A few games I downloaded never finished installing, randomly stopping in the middle or retroactively running out of space. Some games valve steam deck me their “content” was “locked” when I tried to move them, or that they grabbed “corrupt update files.” Sometimes parts of my library, or all of the games on my SD card, would temporarily go missing.

I destroyed one card after the Deck seemingly froze while formatting it, and I stupidly reset the console (never ever do that while writing to flash). There were times I couldn’t reach the Steam servers to download save games or verify ownership of a title — and let me tell you, it really sucks to find out you can’t play a single-player game like Control or Red Dead Redemption 2 on the go because of DRM.

(My phone hotspot worked in a pinch.) Occasionally, the whole system would lock up. Sometimes the UI would break or scale badly while connecting or disconnecting an external monitor. And while I didn’t have a lot of problems playing or installing games to SD, I did have lots of issues transferring between the SD and internal drive — and unusually long transfer times during which the Deck wouldn’t let me do anything else with the system.

Games I’d already installed would suddenly need new updates or need to randomly re-verify a gigabyte or three worth of contents, and I had to download Elden Ring a second time after I’d already preloaded it. Even when the Valve steam deck Deck has no Wi-Fi, it pauses a long time before launching games, presumably to see if it can download a cloud save.

In many cases, Valve’s developers admitted I’d spotted a bug, and to their credit, a lot has changed over the past two weeks. The UI used to be incredibly choppy, and it’s way smoother now. I can now stream games reliably to Deck from my desktop PC, even if I can’t actually use the Deck’s controls or gyro there just yet. After at least three huge tweaks to valve steam deck frame limiter, it’s finally stable.

A huge update to Proton enabled a whole bunch of additional games. But as I type these words, Valve has yet to fix Bluetooth, which never fails to lag, skip, and fail to reconnect after waking from sleep, valve steam deck a recent update introduced a new issue where the Deck no longer reconnects to Wi-Fi, even though I have auto-connect checked and the password saved. The auto-brightness adjustment has never worked properly for me, despite Valve’s tweaks.

The last update seemingly broke the download progress indicator, and. I think you get the picture. In an interview, Valve candidly told The Verge that it knows many things won’t be ready on day one; it’s had to focus on showstopper bugs and hardware production while deprioritizing other work. “So many things will be coming out immediately after launch, in the weeks after launch,” Valve veteran Greg Coomer tells me.

“We really do look at it as the starting gun instead of the finish line.” Valve’s Lawrence Yang says early adopters should expect frequent fixes for some time to come, even if you won’t necessarily see valve steam deck multiple changes per day I saw during the review period. Are frequent updates a bad thing? Early access can be neat! It’s exciting to see new features appear — like how all of a sudden, I could play my games on an external monitor with three different kinds of upscaling, including AMD’s FSR, which you can apply to any game from the quick settings menu and made Fallout 4 look so much better on a big monitor.

But it’s not great if, say, you want to hear how well the Valve steam deck Deck runs Windows before you buy one because I never got to test that — Valve’s promised GPU drivers have yet to materialize. The ABXY face buttons rattle a tiny bit if you shake the Deck, but I like how they feel to press. And you might actually care how well the Steam Deck runs Windows — because, despite Valve’s best efforts, the single-most frustrating thing is the one everyone saw coming a mile away: right now, you won’t quite know whether a game will actually run on Linux until you’ve downloaded it, installed it, patched it, let it install the first-time-launch dependencies, and hit play.

Let’s talk about those efforts for a moment because they’re not small: Valve’s Proton compatibility layer (which is built on top of Wine) really does make many Windows games run on Linux, and run incredibly well.

I only saw the rare glitch, like weird effects around flashing lights in Max Payne 3 and choppy cutscenes in 1997’s Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II, and I wouldn’t be surprised to hear if those plagued the Windows versions as well. Additionally, Valve has a team of people reviewing the entire Steam catalog to see how games play — as of February 24th, 419 of them “work great,” and 398 are “playable” with tweaks, according to SteamDB scrapers. You can also theoretically look at the ProtonDB community reports to see what’s broken or try Valve’s checker to see which games in your own library might work.

But in practice, I couldn’t completely rely on any of those sources when it came time to play. They’ve all got holes.

valve steam deck

Duck Game is certified gold on ProtonDB, but listed as unsupported on Steam Deck, and it didn’t run for me. Valve steam deck database shows Persona 4 Golden is completely unsupported, too, even though Valve did the legwork to fix it and I played a few minutes without issue. And I definitely disagree that Deathloop “plays great” on Deck “right out of the box,” considering the low frame rate and stuttery Xbox gamepad emulation I saw when I tried to play.

Valve also lists its own Half-Life 2 as a “great on Deck” title, but the default control scheme didn’t work for me at all (though a custom one totally did).

And even if the listings were accurate today, there’s a chance they won’t be tomorrow — like how Cyberpunk 2077 was working, even after the big patch, and as valve steam deck publish, I can’t run it at all. Reading games from an SD card never felt like a problem, but write speeds felt a bit slow.

This up-to-90MB / sec card usually only gave me half that. If you’re looking to play some of the biggest games in the world, which often use anti-cheat software, you may need Windows as well. Remember my PUBG analogy at the beginning of this story? PUBG doesn’t run at all, nor does Destiny 2 or Apex Legends or GTA 5 or Lost Ark.

My very first night with valve steam deck Steam Deck, I discovered it won’t run the most important games I play with my friends — Halo Infinite and Back 4 Blood — and none of these are a fluke. When we contacted the biggest game developers about whether they’d deign to enable anti-cheat now that Valve offers built-in support, most of them declined to even answer the question.

Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney was braver, explicitly telling me why Fortnite won’t — because the rewards don’t justify the work it’d take to convince themselves they aren’t letting cheaters in.

On a lesser note, Valve doesn’t differentiate between whether the Windows or Linux version of a game is the version that’s been verified, so you need to watch out if a game might quietly have both. My review unit installed the Linux version of Rocket League, which no longer offers multiplayer, and the Windows version of Shadow of the Tomb Raider, which doesn’t launch at all.

And while you can dive into a compatibility menu to force the Deck to download the other version, there’s nothing to warn you which is which — and, sadly, the Linux version of Shadow of the Tomb Raider doesn’t support Windows cloud saves, so I might have to start from scratch.

Agree to Continue: Steam Deck Every smart device now requires you to agree to a series of terms and conditions before you can use it — contracts that no one actually reads. It’s impossible for us to read and analyze every single one of these agreements. But we started counting exactly how many times you have to hit “agree” to use devices when we review them since these are agreements most people don’t read and definitely can’t negotiate.

The Steam Deck itself doesn’t require you to sign any agreements, but you’ll valve steam deck a Steam account to log in, which means signing the Steam Subscriber Agreement and the Valve Privacy Policy unless you plan to preempt them by loading a different OS on the system. In the vast majority of cases, that’s valve steam deck mandatory agreements. I don’t blame Valve for shipping the Steam Deck before it’s fully ready. I might have made the same choice myself, considering Valve’s got at least half a year’s worth of preorders to fulfill before a single new customer will experience the Deck.

That’s a lot of early adopters who’ll likely be willing to endure some bugs to be part of the club. Also, the Deck’s impressive performance might not be that impressive for long, since their RDNA 2 integrated graphics are beginning to make their way into thin-and-light laptops and presumably other portables to come.

Valve probably doesn’t want to sell stale chips. But you should know that it also means reviewers like me didn’t get to properly test it all: not Windows, not the delayed Dock, not Xbox Cloud Gaming (since we’re still waiting on the Linux browser version to recognize the Steam Deck’s gamepad), and not the ability to swap between two apps because that’s a feature Valve added at the last moment.

And The Verge doesn’t review gadgets on potential. We review what we can see and touch. I do have some faith in Valve: as an owner of an original Steam Controller and the Steam Link streaming HDMI dongle, a passive observer of the Valve Index VR headset, and a pundit who can draw a straight line between the Steam Deck and Valve’s failed Steam Machines, I’m pretty sure it isn’t lip service when Valve says it’s planning to keep updating the Deck and building out the portable category.

The Steam Controller and Steam Link got bug fixes and feature updates long after it was clear they weren’t going to change the world. But if early access isn’t your beverage of choice, you might just want to wait for a Steam Deck 2. Because Valve, no big believer in the Osborne effect, is already strongly hinting that a sequel is inbound. Valve has repeatedly said that Steam Deck should be a “multigenerational product,” including in a new interview with The Verge.

Valve founder Gabe Newell went one better in a chat with Edge, saying that “the second iterations” will be more about “the capabilities that mobile gives us, above and beyond what you would get in a traditional desktop or laptop gaming environment.” One last shot of the Steam Deck. When I flew to Valve’s headquarters last August to see the Steam Deck, I told you why I was putting money down: I loved the idea of taking my PC games on the go, resuming them right where I left off on my desktop, finally having the time to play through Control and Resident Evil 2 and Fallout 4 and The Witcher 3 and a mountain of indie games I used to wait years to buy on Switch because that’s the only way I found enough time to see them through.

So far, that’s the one part of the Steam Deck that’s largely working out, and I can only hope it’ll get better. Maybe game developers will natively target the Deck. Maybe they’ll come to terms with anti-cheat. Or maybe, like the Nvidia Shield portable I reviewed and purchased in 2013, it’ll stare down at me from a shelf, forever taunting me with unrealized potential. But at least this one seems to have a decent library of compatible games from the get-go. For now, I’m having fun.

My own 64GB model is coming in Q2, and I can’t wait to early access the heck out of its eMMC storage — and probably, swap in the SSD I already bought.

valve steam deck

Reviewers Liked • Killer joysticks, and most other buttons are up to their caliber • Powerful, high-quality hardware at an unheard-of price • Huge library of games • Innovative and flexible • Excellent build quality • Continued Play lets you seamlessly move between PC and Deck • MicroSD for more storage • You can nuke the OS and literally just install Windows if you want By TechRadar on February 25, 2022 90 The Steam Deck is a brilliant gaming device that should appeal to PC gamers looking for a way to play their games while on the go, but who don’t valve steam deck a gaming laptop.

For console gamers who want a polished, straightforward experience, knock half a star off our score, but don’t discount the Steam Deck either. By Engadget on February 25, 2022 81 The Steam Deck is a Frankenstein synthesis of a Wii U and a Vita, but with Valve’s DNA coursing valve steam deck its cables.

It’s a Steam Controller and a Steam Machine in one hefty package, and I’ve come to appreciate it for what it does best. The Steam Deck isn’t valve steam deck mobile device to take on your everyday commute; it’s a Steam library extender, opening up new places to play around the house. I wouldn’t recommend the Steam Deck as an introduction to PC gaming, but for millions of existing Steam users, it’s worth the price of entry, even if you just play a few times a month, two hours at a time.

By The Verge on February 25, 2022 65 When I flew to Valve’s headquarters last August valve steam deck see the Steam Deck, I told you why I was putting money down: I loved the idea of taking my PC games on the go, resuming them right where I left off on my desktop, finally having the time to play through Control and Resident Evil 2 and Fallout 4 and The Witcher 3 and a mountain of indie games I used to wait years to buy on Switch because that’s the only way I valve steam deck enough time valve steam deck see them through.

So far, that’s the one part of the Steam Deck that’s largely working out, and I can only hope it’ll get better. By Wired on February 25, 2022 50 I've played multiple games from my backlog over the past few weeks, just because I'm no longer tethered to my gaming PC.

The experience hasn't been as seamless as I'd have liked, but give it six months to a year and the OS could be in a completely different state. Or, you know, just wait for the inevitable Steam Deck V2. By TrustedReviews on February 25, 2022 90 The Steam Deck is a more powerful alternative to the Nintendo Switch, capable of playing virtually any PC game on the valve steam deck.

Performance is excellent for a portable, with SteamOS offering a console-like experience, while still retaining all of the versatility of a PC. Battery life isn’t great when playing demanding games, but the Steam Deck remains the absolute best option for portable PC gaming. By EuroGamer on February 25, 2022 There've been many challenges in reviewing Steam Deck and many frustrations over the last couple of weeks. However, when the 'wins' started to roll in, I only only became more intrigued and excited about the system and the potential it offers.

Reviewing Steam Deck is essentially reviewing a PC, which can be done in any number of different and interesting way. And with that in mind, I can't wait to read other reviews and to find out what other surprises the system may have to offer. By GameSpot on February 25, 2022 The Steam Deck is a wonderfully constructed and powerful portable PC that can, in the right hands, be a lot more than what Valve envisions with SteamOS, given your patience to work with Linux or replace it entirely.

That isn't a requirement, however, and in some cases antithetical to the device Valve is pitching here. What the Steam Deck excels at is being a mobile hub for your Steam games, giving you enough to work with to get the best out of a selection of games you can't go without while away from your desktop. In that regard, there simply is nothing better on the market right now.

By Polygon on February 25, 2022 For people who already have a Steam library, or are eager to dip their toes into the waters of PC gaming, the Steam Deck already feels like a legitimate alternative. It builds on the Switch’s pitch of playing anywhere and everywhere, because now my games and save files aren’t tied to a console. They live valve steam deck the cloud, following me wherever I can access Steam — from my Steam Deck, to my gaming PC, to my work laptop, and wherever else I might want them in the future.

By VG247 on February 25, 2022 I’m going to dive more into that side of the Steam Deck in the coming weeks – particularly into the idea of using it as an emulation powerhouse. For now, however, I’m generally pretty pleased with what it is, for what it is, though I have high expectations for the device to evolve and improve through a regular cadence of software updates. If Valve can hit a strong tempo there, they could be on to something special.
Valve’s new portable console, the Steam Deck (not to be confused with Elgato’s Stream Deck), officially launched on Friday.

If you preordered early, you should have yours in hand starting this week, Valve tells WIRED. You’ll likely find it’s not the easiest device to navigate, as it has lots of settings and customization options and doesn’t come with any instructions. We’re here to help. First announced on July 15 last year, Valve’s Steam Deck was originally set to release before the 2021 holiday season, but with the ongoing supply chain issues, that got pushed back.

Sign up for our Games newsletter and never miss our latest gaming tips, reviews, and features. There are two big software differences that set the Steam Deck apart from other consoles. The first is the sheer number of games you can play on it, thanks to Valve’s Steam game marketplace, which is preloaded onto the Steam Deck OS—although most of these games were not designed with a 7-inch touchscreen in mind (read our story about how to find compatible games for more info).

If you have a PC, Steam, and a ton of games you’ve already purchased (and likely a lot that you haven’t yet played), the Steam Deck can look very appealing.

valve steam deck

Second, you can use the Steam Valve steam deck in desktop mode to run other programs and launchers—think Battle.net and Origin—once you’ve installed Windows (it comes with Linux). If you haven’t yet bought the Steam Deck, or are waiting for your preorder to arrive, we also have a review of the Deck that can help answer some of your broader questions about its functionality and what gameplay is like.

And, you know, whether it’s worth buying another console—especially when the most affordable option is $399 for 64 GB (less than the file size of Cyberpunk 2077).

This article is geared more toward what you can do once you actually have a Steam Deck in hand. So, let’s get to it. Here’s how to do some of the most important actions on the Steam Deck. How to Get to the Steam Deck’s Settings There are two ways to get to your settings on the Steam Deck. First, navigate to the Wi-Fi symbol in the top bar and hit the A button. The second is to press the Steam button on the left side of the Deck, scroll down to Settings, and hit A.

You can also access a smaller settings menu by hitting the Quick Settings button on the right side of the deck (the three dots). This menu will only let you adjust things like the volume, your microphone, and the screen brightness. How to Check Whether Your Steam Deck is Up-to-Date Once you’re in your settings, scroll to System. Software Updates is at the top of the System menu.

If you hit the Check For Updates button valve steam deck will either start downloading the update or revert back to the Check For Updates button if there isn’t one. Underneath the button, it shows you the last time the Deck checked for an update. How to Check Your Steam Deck’s Battery Life The Steam Deck has two ways to check your battery life—and see its projection for how long you have until it hits 0 percent (although this fluctuates greatly, so take it with a grain of salt).

The first is to scroll up to the top navigation bar and click on the Battery icon. The second is to hit the Quick Settings button. This will automatically bring you to the battery life screen, which shows you the percentage of charge it’s currently holding on the left and how many hours and minutes it projects the battery will last on the right. How to Adjust Your Steam Deck’s Speaker and Microphone Volume Aside from the speaker volume buttons on top of the Steam Deck to the left of the fan, the easiest way to adjust both the speaker volume and your microphone is by pressing the Quick Settings button.

From here you can turn your volume and mic up or down or mute them completely. How to Format Your MicroSD Card on Steam Deck In your settings, open the System menu.

Scroll down to Format SD Card and hit the Format button. The Deck will prompt you to confirm that you would like to format your SD card, which means all data on the card will be lost and cannot be undone. Hit Confirm and the button changes to “Formatting valve steam deck ” This might take a few minutes. The button will change back to “Format” once it’s done, without giving you a notification. Worth noting, the Steam Deck formats SD cards in ext4 format, which isn’t the standard format for an SD card out of the box, so it must be formatted before use.

How to Take a Screenshot on Steam Deck Press the Steam button and the R1 trigger at the same time. This will only work while using the Steam Deck UI, not on Desktop mode. To view your screenshots, hit the Steam button, scroll to Media, and scroll to All. To move your screenshot off the Steam Deck, you can upload it to Steam by hovering over the image and hitting the Options button (the burger) and choosing Upload.

From the game’s store page, you’ll see a green Add to Cart button on the right. Similar to Steam on a desktop, it’ll ask you valve steam deck this is a gift or for yourself, then ask you to input your payment method (it is much easier to do this on desktop with a keyboard, rather than using the deck’s touchscreen keypad) or enter your security code for an existing card.

Hit the green Purchase button. You will then need to go to your Library to download the game. The quickest way to delete a game is also via the Storage menu.

While hovering over the game you would like to uninstall, click X to remove it. You can also uninstall a game from the Installed section of your Library screen. Select the game, scroll across to the Gear icon and press it, then scroll down to Manage. At the bottom of this screen, you will see the uninstall option.

valve steam deck

How to Change the Game Controls on Steam Deck From your Library, select the game you’d like to adjust the controls for. Scroll to the right on its product valve steam deck and click on the Controller button. This will bring up the Current Layout settings. At the top it will show you what controller template the game is currently using.

You can click on this to view the Recommended template, additional templates (such as using Gyro, mouse only, and with mouse trackpad), and Community Layouts.

When hovering over the controls you would like, click A to select. From here, you can also choose to enable the Back Grip Buttons, any Gyro Behavior, and designate what the Right Trackpad will act as. When viewing the Current layout, you can also scroll across to Edit layout if you would like to map the controls manually.

You can do this for the ABXY buttons, DPad, Triggers, Joysticks, Trackpads, and Gyro. You can also create custom Action Sets. How to Connect Your Steam Deck to a Controller Navigate to your Settings, scroll down to Bluetooth, and toggle it on. Make sure your controller is on, and if it has a button to enable Bluetooth connectivity, press it (I did this test with the Xbox Forza Horizon 5 controller and it worked seamlessly). Once the Steam Deck has found the controller, it will show up under Devices.

Click on it to connect, and once it’s done it will show as paired. You can now use it, and valve steam deck will automatically pair whenever the controller and Bluetooth are turned on. How to Connect Your Steam Deck to a TV or Monitor To connect your Steam Deck to either a TV or your computer monitor, you will need a USB-C to HDMI adapter. I used this one from Anker without any problems, but if you’re planning a long session, you will likely want one with valve steam deck so the Deck will charge at the same time.

Your Steam Deck’s screen will be turned off while it is connected to an external screen. When plugging your Steam Deck into a TV, we recommend using a wireless external controller connected to the Deck via Bluetooth so you can sit farther away from the screen.

Once you’ve plugged it in, if your TV doesn’t automatically recognize the device, head to your TV’s inputs and choose the HDMI port it’s plugged into. After a few seconds, your screen from the Steam Deck should show up on your TV without any problems, and you can navigate around as you normally would (although valve steam deck on your screen size, the proportions of the display may look off, which is something Valve is working on).

More Great WIRED Stories • 📩 The latest on tech, science, and more: Get our newsletters! • Driving while baked?

Inside the high-tech quest to find out • You (might) need a patent for that woolly mammoth • Sony's AI drives a race car like a champ • How to sell your old smartwatch or fitness tracker • Inside the lab where Intel tries to hack its own chips • 👁️ Explore AI like never before with our new database • 🏃🏽‍♀️ Want the best tools to get healthy?

Check out our Gear team’s picks for the best fitness trackers, running gear (including shoes and socks), and best headphones WIRED is where tomorrow is realized. It is the essential source of information and ideas that make sense of a world in constant transformation. The WIRED conversation illuminates how technology is changing every aspect of our lives—from culture to business, science to design. The breakthroughs and innovations that we uncover lead to new ways of thinking, new connections, and new industries.

• RSS • Site Map • Accessibility Help • Condé Nast Store • Condé Nast Spotlight • Do Not Sell Valve steam deck Personal Info © 2022 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement and Your California Privacy Rights.

Wired may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices
While Valve has yet to actually release a proper iso for SteamOS 3 used on the Steam Deck, others have been taking it into their own hands to provide, like with the new HoloISO.

This is possible, since 99% of what SteamOS uses is open source (not the Steam client though) and so people can easily hack away at it to do whatever they want. It's not exactly the same as SteamOS 3 but it's probably the closest I've seen yet, with the main packages coming direct from Valve with "zero possible edits" the developer says. HoloISO works with quite a lot already including the first-boot experience for the Steam Deck, the main Deck UI, the KDE Plasma Desktop Mode (including Valve's Vapor theme), Global FSR, frame limiting and more.

Some issues exist though, like it not really working on NVIDIA GPUs and Intel needs some package downgrades. For AMD though, it's looking golden. Pictures credit - the HoloISO team.

valve steam deck

Still wouldn't exactly recommend it for full desktop use, best to really wait until Valve release it properly or at least leave it until HoloISO has had time to mature more. Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com. Quoting: StalePopcornThat's cool. I just realized that (IMO) Linux is very compatible with Steam as they seem to have always been okay with others taking their projects and "running with it/rolling their own" and even making some money off the side project.It's really interesting if you think about it, of the why we actually have Steam on Linux in the first place.

MS sees Apple and Android and thinks "Hey, I want that! I get a cut off people selling stuff?" and Valve seeing how Apple only allows their own app store, and figures MS will do the same thing, so know that their time is short and they really need to jump off with both feet running!

But when the Microsoft store does what most of their valve steam deck stuff does and turns out to be a pile of poo, they were never able to really get the developers, developers, developers to utilize their crappy stuff. If they had, Valve's fears would almost certainly have come true. Put it on the desktop and laptop today, only the desktop mode works for me (nvidia desktop and old intel laptop) But it works super stable in x11 plasma desktop. You can install things like heroic and discord normally without flatpaks.

nvidia isn't the easiest to get going but, its not too bad. Instructions for install and x11 plasma desktop with nvidia It gives two options to install, neptune and core/linux core/linux option 2 is the way to go. It'll have a prompt after loading in selection saying type holoinstall to install.

you then enter the drive you valve steam deck to install too, after some basic installation it'll ask for computer name, user name and password then continue the installation.(internet connection is required for this, downloads 4-5~ gigs) On next reboot go into grub (hold shift after bios screen if it doesn't show up) there will be 3 options to load Steamos should be the top one.

Press c or e (i forget which it is, its listed on the screen use your eyes) to do a one time boot edit. there will be a line that looks like this.

valve steam deck

linux /boot/vmlinuz-linux-neptune root=UUID=d22fd341-dfca-4769-875c-05ef50eb3782 rw loglevel=3 quiet change it too linux /boot/vmlinuz-linux-neptune root=UUID=d22fd341-dfca-4769-875c-05ef50eb3782 rw loglevel=3 nomodeset=1 in other words remove the quiet and put nomodeset=1 at the end the quiet is removed so you can see where it stops loading. When it stops loading, hold control + alt and press F2 to open a new user session in terminal.

login as the user you added during installation. install the kernel headers. sudo pacman -S linux-neptune-headers this is for taste as it works. install nvidia with TKGs nvidia all from github cd /goto/some/folder/you/want/to/put/some/git/stuff git clone https://github.com/Frogging-Family/nvidia-all.git cd nvidia-all makepkg -si #it will complain about kernel headers during the process a few times ignore it, it still finds them.

During the install process pick valve steam deck nvidia driver you want, make sure you pick DKMS driver module. nvidia should now work, you will ONLY BE ABLE TO USE THE DESKTOP x11 plasma. Edit: Kdesudo doesn't seem to work unless you change the root users password sudo passwd root enter then re enter the new password gui root should now work properly Restart your pc, at the login screen, top left should be the desktop select drop down, select the x11 plasma desktop option.

your good to go. have fun if you want to have a crack at it. Last edited by RossBC on 5 May 2022 at 10:27 am UTC Quoting: RossBCPut it on the desktop and laptop today, only the desktop mode works for me (nvidia desktop and old intel laptop) But it works super stable in x11 plasma desktop.

You can install things like heroic and discord normally without flatpaks. nvidia isn't the easiest to get going but, its not too bad. Instructions for install and x11 plasma desktop with nvidia It gives two options to install, neptune and core/linux core/linux option 2 is the way to go. It'll have a prompt after loading in selection saying type holoinstall to install. you then enter the drive you want to install too, after some basic installation it'll ask for computer name, user name and password then continue the installation.(internet connection is required for this, downloads 4-5~ gigs) On next reboot go into grub (hold shift after bios screen if it doesn't show up) there will be 3 options to load Steamos should be the top one.

Press c or e (i forget which it is, its listed on the screen use your eyes) to do a one time boot edit. there will be a line that looks like this. linux /boot/vmlinuz-linux-neptune root=UUID=d22fd341-dfca-4769-875c-05ef50eb3782 rw loglevel=3 quiet change it too linux /boot/vmlinuz-linux-neptune root=UUID=d22fd341-dfca-4769-875c-05ef50eb3782 rw loglevel=3 nomodeset=1 in other words remove the quiet and put nomodeset=1 at the end the quiet is removed so you can see where it stops loading.

When it stops loading, hold control + alt and press F2 to open a new user session in terminal. login as the user you added during installation.

install the kernel headers. sudo pacman -S linux-neptune-headers this is for taste as it works. install nvidia with TKGs nvidia all from github cd /goto/some/folder/you/want/to/put/some/git/stuff git clone https://github.com/Frogging-Family/nvidia-all.git cd nvidia-all makepkg -si #it will complain about kernel headers during the process a few times ignore it, it still finds them.

During the install process pick the nvidia driver you want, make sure you pick DKMS driver module. nvidia should now work, you will ONLY BE ABLE TO USE THE DESKTOP x11 plasma. Edit: Kdesudo doesn't seem to work unless you change the root users password sudo passwd root enter then re enter the new password gui root should now work properly Restart your pc, at the login screen, top left should be the desktop select drop down, select the x11 plasma desktop option.

your good to go. have fun if you want to have a crack at it.Does this have a proper installer, and not one that 'wipes all the drives in the system'? While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on: Reward Tiers: Patreon. Plain Donations: Liberapay or PayPal. This ensures all of our main content remains totally valve steam deck for everyone with no article paywalls.

We also don't have tons of adverts, there's also no tracking and we respect your privacy. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue! You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you! • An interview with Aaron Honeycutt from System76 58 minutes ago - iiari • Comedy adventure Catie in MeowmeowLand now on Linux about 3 hours ago - flesk • Wine 7.8 is out now with X11 and OSS drivers converted … about 8 hours ago - Marlock • Comedy adventure Catie in MeowmeowLand now on Linux about 8 hours ago - Eike • Comedy adventure Catie in MeowmeowLand now on Linux about 10 hours ago - Vishar • See more comments • Need Office Expert to Edit Document in Word about 5 hours ago - Cyba.Cowboy • New Desktop Screenshot Thread about 11 hours ago - Arcadius-8606 • Lutris on the Deck about 16 hours ago - Drak • Good game music suggestions - a day ago - Jahimself • How's your verification percentage?

a day ago - Arcadius-8606 • See more valve steam deck player loading… We've all been there. A package you've been patiently waiting for is due to arrive, and you're elated when your shipper says it's delivered.

You rush out to your front door or mail room, and nothing's there. Apparently, this is happening to some Reddit users after they got word their Steam Decks are not making it to their final destination. The few cases that we've seen so far of Steam Decks going missing seem valve steam deck like organized heists and more delivery snafus, though the frustration level is still the same.

Upon discovering their Deck was missing, one Reddit user filed tickets with the carrier and Valve for a resolution. They claim that Valve steam deck told them to go through the carrier first and follow missing package protocols, which involve checking the rest of their property and ensuring it wasn't accidentally delivered to a valve steam deck.

This person was able to get a refund from Valve, and through some miracle, FedEx eventually tracked down the missing Steam Deck. Some users think the packaging for the Steam Deck, as discreet as it is, might be the culprit. This unboxing video shows a giant lithium battery and "fragile electronics" logo stamped on the front, which pretty much gives much away that there's probably an expensive piece of tech for any would-be package thief.

I doubt Valve will be changing packaging anytime soon. If you think that your Steam Deck might be vulnerable to theft, make sure you reach the carrier and ask for a signature for the delivery once the shipping is confirmed.

valve steam deck

For now, if your Steam Deck does go 'missing' in transit, file a support ticket with Valve and work with the shipping carrier for lost package protocols, and hopefully, your much-coveted Steam Deck could be found or replaced.

We've reached out to Valve to ask what folks should do exactly if they find themselves in a Deckless situation. Jorge Jimenez • • Jorge is a hardware writer from valve steam deck enchanted lands of New Jersey. When he's not filling the office with the smell of Pop-Tarts, he's reviewing all sorts of gaming hardware from laptops with the latest mobile GPUs to gaming chairs with built-in valve steam deck massagers.

He's been covering games and tech for nearly ten years and has written for Dualshockers, WCCFtech, and Tom's Guide. PC Gamer is part of Future US Inc, an international media group and leading digital publisher. Visit our corporate site. • About Us • Terms and conditions • Privacy policy • Cookies policy • Advertise with us • Accessibility Statement • Careers © Future US, Inc. Full 7th Floor, 130 West 42nd Street, New York, NY 10036.

living with STEAM DECK - 1 month later




2022 www.videocon.com