New lunar m.ok.ru 2017

new lunar m.ok.ru 2017 new lunar m.ok.ru 2017

With firecrackers, fried dumplings, and Fai Chun, today’s Doodle welcomes the Year of the Rooster. A time of celebration with family and friends, Lunar New Year falls on the first new moon between January 21 and February 20 each year.

new lunar m.ok.ru 2017

While this means the date is always changing, the traditions surrounding the holiday have long been the same. Leading up to it, families clean their homes to push out bad luck and make room for good fortune.

new lunar m.ok.ru 2017

Once New Year’s Eve arrives, loved ones come together for a reunion dinner where poon choi – a large dish packed with meat, fish, and vegetables – is often shared. On New Year’s Day, red decor and envelopes abound, while lion dancers, paper lanterns, and fireworks fill the streets.

new lunar m.ok.ru 2017

Legend has it that many of these traditions stem from fending off the Nian, a mythical beast that would attack an ancient village each New Year’s Day. With the help of a mysterious old man, villagers discovered that the creature was afraid of the color red, as well as loud noises — and so the festivities began.

Although the Nian never did return, the celebrations most certainly did. Here’s to health, happiness, and good fortune in the new year!

• This Doodle's Reach With traditional foods, glowing lanterns, and lots of red, today’s Doodle welcomes the Year of the Rooster.

new lunar m.ok.ru 2017

A time of celebration with family and friends, Lunar New Year falls on the first new moon between January 21 and February 20 each year. While this means the date is always changing, the traditions surrounding the holiday have long been the same.

new lunar m.ok.ru 2017

In the US, Asian-American communities host festivals across the country – the oldest and largest of which is in San Francisco’s Chinatown. At these events, red decor and envelopes abound, while lion dancers, giant puppets, and firecrackers fill the streets.

new lunar m.ok.ru 2017

Legend has it that many of these traditions stem from fending off the Nian, a mythical beast that would attack an ancient village each New Year’s Day. With the help of a mysterious old man, villagers discovered that the creature was afraid of the color red, as well as loud noises — and so the festivities began.

Although the Nian never did return, the celebrations most certainly did. Here’s to health, happiness, and good fortune in the new year!

new lunar m.ok.ru 2017

• This Doodle's Reach

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