Blue mosque

blue mosque

Table of Contents • Sultanahmet Mosque • Blue Mosque Istanbul- The Background • Sultan Ahmed’s point blue mosque view • Blue Mosque Istanbul- Overview • The Mosque dress code • The Blue Mosque Istanbul- call to prayers • The Blue Mosque Istanbul- admission fee • What makes the Blue Mosque Istanbul so famous? • Which district is the Blue Mosque Istanbul in? • Can you pray and can you visit? • Blue Mosque Istanbul- interior • Some generic questions about the Blue Mosque Istanbul • Is Blue Mosque originally Christian?

• Is Blue Mosque wonder of the world? • Blue mosque- how much time? • Blue mosque- the best time to visit? • Key Reminders • How to Reach the Blue Mosque- Transportation Guide • How to go to Sultanahmet from Topkapi Palace • How to go to Sultanahmet from Hagia Sophia • How to go to Sultanahmet from Taksim • How to go to Sultanahmet from Dolmabahce Palace [7] • How to go to Sultanahmet from Kadikoy [8] • How to go to Sultanahmet from Ataturk airport • How to go to Sultanahmet from new Istanbul airport • Conclusion • References Sultanahmet Mosque The Blue Mosque Istanbul is a major one you should definitely visit in Istanbul.

As known, Istanbul [1] has a huge history and Sultanahmet square and mosque are one of the cornerstones of this fascinating city. The Blue Mosque Istanbul The Blue Mosque is located in the just opposite of Hagia Sophia… Which one do you think is greater?

Not a good idea to compare the Blue Mosque and Hagia Sophia. As we already explained in Hagia Sophia’s post [2], the current museum which was converted from the mosque and once upon a time it was a church contains a huge history.

So, that is why Hagia Sophia is too different than other religious places. While we were visiting both Hagia Sophia and Sultanahmet Mosque, we heard some questions. Some tourists were having a confusion indeed, “which one is Hagia Sophia?”, “Which one is Blue Mosque?”. It is pretty easy. Just count the minarets. You will see blue mosque minarets for Hagia Sophia and you will see six minarets for the Blue Mosque. With this simple math, you will find out the Hagia Sophia and the Blue Mosque.

Please blue mosque that blue mosque are many versions called out. Blue Mosque, Sultanahmet, Sultan Ahmet, Sultanahmed, Sultan Ahmed, etc., they are basically the same thing :). Moreover, Sultanahmet Camii is the Turkish version. Blue Mosque Istanbul- The Background The six minarets story make this fascinating mosque different than other mosques. There are some resources talking about this mosque has been constructed intentionally with six minarets.

After checking the design of the current structure before construction, Sultan Ahmed was amazed and ordered for the construction. Basically, he wanted six minarets from the beginning. However, the minaret count was equal with the Prophet’s mosque in Mecca- Masjid al-Haram. So, the sultan blue mosque blamed with arrogance. Due to these problems at that time, the sultan ordered to add blue mosque more minaret to the mosque in Mecca and he solved the problems.

The other stories look like more fairytales. The sultan ordered gold minarets (altin in Turkish), but the designer understood as six minarets (alti in Turkish). So, that is the reason for six minarets. But, this looks like a story that was transferred through the generations. The blue mosque was living in Topkapi Palace, so they were really close to the square.

It can be checked easily, right? So this was an easy mistake, but who knows? The other story is the sultan ordered gold minarets, but the empire didn’t have enough money and the designer decided to construct six minarets. Sultan Ahmed’s point of view Another thing is, the Ottomans had a generic rule. “If you defeat another empire in a war, okay it is time to construct a great building.” However, while the sultan ordered construction, he didn’t have such a huge victory, so that was not a good time at all.

Additionally, Persians had victories against Ottomans in this period. So, he wanted to show the empire strength to every opponent. For this reason, he was also blamed, but he told that “all the blamers should count this fantastic figure for my victories in the near future.” Unfortunately, he didn’t live for a long time, though.

He passed away in 1617 where his tomb is also in the mosque area. Blue Mosque Istanbul- Overview The square is very popular and one of the best tourist attraction places in Istanbul and Turkey.

It still continues its function. It was constructed between 1609 and 1616. The facility contains Sultan Ahmed’s tomb, madrasah, and hospice. Sibyan Mektebi is being used as the Mosque Information Center right now. You can check the free presentation of the mosque here. The Blue Mosque Istanbul- Exterior Basically, the main dome inner diameter is 23.5 meters, outer diameter is 43 meters and minaret height is 64 meters.

[3] The Sultanahmet Mosque is also called as the Blue Mosque because of the dominant blue tiles. It contains more than 20,000 hand-made blue, green and white tiles. They are the Iznik style tiles.

The architect is Sedefkar Mehmet. Additionally, Sedefkar Mehmed constructed the mosque with late classical Ottoman influences.

It is perfectly symmetrical and you can also see Hagia Sophia influence on the mosque. The interior is very amazing and inspiring. The chandeliers are good and they used ostrich eggs to avoid cobwebs. The calligraphy is also amazing, many of them made by Seyyid Kasim Gubari contains verses from Qur’an. The Mosque dress code Check this figure out. As we mentioned before, the mosque continues to serve as a mosque. So, the environment itself is still dynamic.

Due to being still used as a mosque, you should be blue mosque about your dress. It is simple, you should cover yourself a little bit and that is all. Basically, as a man, you should wear at least shorts to cover your knee. Of course, you need a sweater or t-shirt to cover your upper body :). If you are a woman, you also need something to cover your legs. And your upper section should not be exposed.

To cover your head, there is a blue mosque scarf served by the mosque. Make sure you are good to go based on this figure. The Blue Mosque- Dress Code The Blue Mosque Istanbul- call to prayers This is six times during the day. For this reason, it is prohibited to check the mosque inside during praying- 90 minutes per each.

On Friday, it is tougher. Since Friday noon praying is a very crowded activity, you should wait till 2.30 p.m. The mosque is open every day. The Blue Mosque Istanbul- admission fee There is no entrance fee. So, there is no need to question Museum Pass [4] or other methods for this mosque. Blue mosque, you can still donate to the mosque.

What makes the Blue Mosque Istanbul so famous? It is the main mosque in Istanbul. Blue tiles, stained glasses, domes, square, calligraphy; they are all amazing. So this combination makes the Sultanahmet Camii (Sultanahmet Mosque) makes so famous. Additionally, the Suleymaniye Mosque can be thought as second best. Which district is the Blue mosque Mosque Istanbul in? It is in the Fatih region. Moreover, it is very close to Hagia Sophia, Topkapi Palace, and the Hippodrome.

The square location is amazing. It is on the European side of Istanbul. Can you pray and can you visit? You can both pray in the mosque and visit the mosque. This makes the mosque a special one. Blue Mosque Istanbul- interior There are three entrances to the mosque from the square and around. Inside of the mosque, there are over 20,000 Iznik hand-made tiles. There is a huge dome surrounded by a semi-dome at each of four sides. Four pillars also called elephant legs to support the domes [5].

Additionally, 260 windows provide a good brightness inside the mosque. The Blue Mosque- Interior You are already aware of Mihrab which shows the direction of Mecca and Minbar where the Imam gives the sermon. It is also interesting that the mosque has a private Sultan lodge for his pray. It is normally where everyone has the same right during praying, however, the Sultans mostly preferred to have a private lodge.

The Blue Mosque- Plan Some generic questions about the Blue Mosque Istanbul Is Blue Mosque originally Christian? Good question, but it was never Christian.

Is Blue Mosque wonder of the world? Another good question, but unfortunately it is not. As you are aware, Hagia Sophia was one of the top twenty finalists. Don’t forget they are not the same buildings. Blue mosque- how much time? One or two hours will definitely be sufficient for the mosque. As a kind reminder, there are many good places you should definitely visit around the mosque and the square such as the Hippodrome, Topkapi Palace, Hagia Sophia, and Basilica Cistern.

So, one day would be enough totally. Blue mosque- the best time to visit? You can see the post about the best time to visit Istanbul. It would be good to keep that in mind, so we don’t have a special warning for you other than mentioned in this post. [6] Key Reminders We saw once but didn’t notice when we checked the mosque last time. Please ignore people who offer you to enter the mosque.

If the line is long, don’t worry. The long line will finish at least in 10 minutes after Friday noon praying. Since people are still allowed to pray, it is good to remain quiet and it is also good not to use flash for photos. Prayer Entrance How to Reach the Blue Mosque- Transportation Guide How to go to Sultanahmet from Topkapi Palace It is very close, just 3-4 minutes by walking. How to go to Sultanahmet from Hagia Sophia It is very close, just blue mosque minutes by walking.

You will definitely notice the Blue Mosque since it is the opposite of Hagia Sophia. How to go to Sultanahmet from Taksim Unfortunately, traffic jam can be frustrating in Istanbul. So, we first recommend you to use railways to reach your destinations. • By taxi, you can go there in 20 minutes from the Taksim square.

It is around 5 km or 3 miles. • If you like walking, this can take an hour to reach the region. This can be very tiring, however, there is a great route. You can check Beyoglu, Galata Tower, Karakoy, Eminonu, Grand Bazaar and finally reach Hagia Sophia and Sultanahmet. What do you think? • Okay, here is the best option.

You can catch F1 (Taksim-Kabatas funicular) and then transfer to T1 (Bagcilar Kabatas tramway line). You can get off from the train at Sultanahmet stop.

If you want you can walk to Kabatas by walking and then skip F1- the funicular. It is just 15 minutes by walking. How to go to Sultanahmet from Dolmabahce Palace [7] This one is easy. You can catch the M1 from Kabatas. How to go to Sultanahmet from Kadikoy [8] Most feasible two options are as follows. • You can go to Eminonu by city line or Turyol ferries.

And then, you can catch T1 or walk from Eminonu. • You can also go by M4 metro from Kadikoy to Ayrilik Cesmesi and transfer to Marmaray and go to Sirkeci. It is just 10-15 minutes after Sirkeci. How to go to Sultanahmet from Ataturk airport Ataturk airport is not blue mosque anymore for commercial flights.

The transition period is completed. However, we still would like to keep these options whether you need it. The distance blue mosque this airport to Hagia Sophia Sophia Istanbul is around 20 km or 32 miles.

Especially, what we said above (recommending railways) can be challenging for some situations with huge suitcases.

• The best option is definitely to catch a taxi. • The second option would be to go to Taksim by Havabus and then you can catch a taxi or follow the guidelines above. • The other options are challenging. One of them is to catch M1, walk a little bit and then catch T1. The second one is to catch M1 again and then transfer to Marmaray and then walk around 10 minutes. How to go to Sultanahmet from new Istanbul airport New Istanbul Airport is pretty far away from the city center.

You can catch the bus Yenikapi-Sirkeci from the new airport. And then, you can get off from the bus the nearest station to Hagia Sophia. Actually, since it is above 50 km, taxi option might be costly. Havaist is the operator. So, you can check their site for the latest updates.

blue mosque

{INSERTKEYS} [9] Conclusion Istanbul has a huge history. Blue Mosque or Sultanahmet Mosque whatever you call it is one of the best places that should definitely be visited. The mosque is the top mosque in Istanbul, so don’t miss it if you have a chance. References • https://www.istanbulfantasy.com/istanbul-history/ • https://www.istanbulfantasy.com/hagia-sophia/ • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultan_Ahmed_Mosque • https://www.istanbulfantasy.com/museum-pass-istanbul/ • http://www.sultanahmetcamii.org/architecture-of-the-mosque/ • https://www.istanbulfantasy.com/best-time-to-visit-istanbul/ • https://www.istanbulfantasy.com/dolmabahce-palace/ • https://www.istanbulfantasy.com/kadikoy-and-moda-the-ultimate-guide/ • http://www.hava.ist/en/ Architecture The Sultan Ahmed Mosque has one main dome, six minarets, and eight secondary domes.

The design is the culmination of two centuries of Ottoman mosque development. It incorporates some Byzantine Christian elements of the neighboring Hagia Sophia with traditional Islamic architecture and is considered to be the last great mosque of the classical period. The architect, Sedefkâr Mehmed Ağa, synthesized the ideas of his master Sinan, aiming for overwhelming size, majesty and splendour.

Interior At its lower levels and at every pier, the interior of the mosque is lined with more than 20,000 handmade İznik style ceramic tiles, made at Iznik (the ancient Nicaea) in more than fifty different tulip designs.

The tiles at lower levels are traditional in design, while at gallery level their design becomes flamboyant with representations of flowers, fruit and cypresses. The tiles were made under the supervision of the Iznik master. The price to be paid for each tile was fixed by the sultan’s decree, while tile prices in general increased over time. As a result, the quality of the tiles used in the building decreased gradually.

The upper levels of the interior are dominated by blue paint. More than 200 stained glass windows with intricate designs admit natural light, today assisted by chandeliers.

On the chandeliers, ostrich eggs are found that were meant to avoid cobwebs inside the mosque by repelling spiders. The decorations include verses from the Qur’an, many of them made by Seyyid Kasim Gubari, regarded as the greatest calligrapher of his time. The floors are covered with carpets, which are donated by the faithful and are regularly replaced as they wear out. The many spacious windows confer a spacious impression. The casements at floor level are decorated with opus sectile.

Each exedra has five windows, some of which are blind. Each semi-dome has 14 windows and the central dome 28 (four of which are blind). The coloured glass for the windows was a gift of the Signoria of Venice to the sultan.

Most of these coloured windows have by now been replaced by modern versions with little or no artistic merit. The most important element in the interior of the mosque is the mihrab, which is made of finely carved and sculptured marble, with a stalactite niche and a double inscriptive panel above it.

It is surrounded by many windows. The adjacent walls are sheathed in ceramic tiles. To the right of the mihrab is the richly decorated minber, or pulpit, where the imam stands when he is delivering his sermon at the time of noon prayer on Fridays or on holy days. The mosque has been designed so that even when it is at its most crowded, everyone in the mosque can see and hear the imam.

The royal kiosk is situated at the south-east corner. It comprises a platform, a loggia and two small retiring rooms. It gives access to the royal loge in the south-east upper gallery of the mosque. These retiring rooms became the headquarters of the Grand Vizier during the suppression of the rebellious Janissary Corps in 1826. The royal loge (hünkâr mahfil) is supported by ten marble columns. It has its own mihrab, which used to be decorated with a jade rose and gilt and with one hundred Qurans on an inlaid and gilded lecterns.

The many lamps inside the mosque were once covered with gold and gems. Among the glass bowls one could find ostrich eggs and crystal balls. All these decorations have been removed or pillaged for museums.

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blue mosque

The great tablets on the walls are inscribed with the names of the caliphs and verses from the Quran. They were originally by the great 17th-century calligrapher Seyyid Kasim Gubari of Diyarbakır but have been repeatedly restored. Exterior The facade of the spacious forecourt was built in the same manner as the facade of the Süleymaniye Mosque, except for the addition of the turrets on the corner domes.

The court is about as large as the mosque itself and is surrounded by a continuous vaulted arcade (revak). It has ablution facilities on both sides. The central hexagonal fountain is small relative to the courtyard. The monumental but narrow gateway to the courtyard stands out architecturally from the arcade.

Its semi-dome has a fine stalactite structure, crowned by a small ribbed dome on a tall tholobate. Its historical elementary school (Sıbyan Mektebi) is used as “Mosque Information Center” which is adjacent to its outer wall on the side of Hagia Sophia. This is where blue mosque provide visitors with a free orientational presentation on the Blue Mosque and Islam in general. A heavy iron chain hangs in the upper part of the court entrance on the western side.

Only the sultan was allowed to enter the court of the mosque on horseback. The chain was put there, so that the sultan had to lower his head every time he entered the court to avoid being hit. This was a symbolic gesture, to ensure the humility of the ruler in the face of the divine. Minarets The Sultan Ahmed Mosque is first one of the two mosques in Turkey that has six minarets, the second one being the Sabancı Mosque blue mosque Adana.

When the number of minarets was blue mosque, the Sultan was criticized for being presumptuous, since this was the same minarets number as at the mosque of the Ka’aba in Mecca. He overcame this problem by ordering a seventh minaret to be built at the Mecca mosque. Four minarets stand at the corners of the Blue Mosque. Each of these fluted, pencil-shaped minarets has three balconies (Called Şerefe) with stalactite corbels, while the two others at the end of the forecourt only have two balconies.

Before the muezzin or prayer caller had to climb a narrow spiral staircase five times a day to announce the call to prayer. Today, a public announce system is being used, and the call can be heard across the old part of the city, echoed by other mosques in the vicinity. Large crowds of both Turks and tourists gather at sunset in the park facing the mosque to hear the call to evening prayers, as the sun sets and the mosque is brilliantly illuminated by colored floodlights.

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Dolmabahce Palace: Tickets & Tours‎ Hagia Sophia Mosque: Tickets & Tours‎ Sultanahmet District: Tickets & Tours‎ Suleymaniye Mosque: Tickets & Tours‎ Topkapi Palace: Tickets & Tours‎ Bosphorus Strait: Tickets & Tours‎ Historic Areas of Istanbul: Tickets & Tours‎ Gulhane Park: Tickets & Tours‎ Galata Tower: Tickets & Tours‎ Rahmi M.

Koc Museum: Tickets & Tours‎ Emirgan Park: Tickets & Tours‎ Miniaturk: Tickets & Tours‎ Ortakoy: Tickets & Tours‎ Balat: Tickets & Tours‎ Chora Museum: Tickets & Tours‎ Restaurants Flights Vacation Rentals Shopping Built between 1609-1616, this impressive mosque has six minarets.

blue mosque

Why is it called "Blue Mosque?" There are two stories: the first, more common one is that the interior is covered in Blue İznik tiles. The second is: many years ago, ancient sailors who sailed by the mosque on the Marmara Sea saw the blue colors of the sea reflected in the mosque. With so many unmissable blue mosque within a mere stroll of each other – and all set around the site of an ancient Byzantine hippodrome – Sultanahmet is an overwhelmingly popular tourist destination, and a prime location for visitors to be wowed on a truly epic scale.

Beyond the wonders of the Blue Mosque, the Hagia Sophia, Topkapi Palace, and more, this relatively small area of Istanbul somehow manages to retain an air of peace and calm. It offers visitors a significantly less celebrated but nonetheless pleasant network of quaint lanes and side streets, majestic panoramas of the Bosphorus, and an impressive assortment of accommodation options for all budgets and tastes.

Before blue mosque the Mosque please remember to be respectful. I have no religious faith at all but will follow any rules asked of me. I had on a singlet but knew my shoulders needed to be covered so had a shirt ready for the visit.

My wife had a shawl to cover her shoulders and head but these are provided by staff at the entrance if you haven't got your own. Shoes need to be removed when entering but do not stand on the carpet while doing so. You can take photographs but not sure if you can blue mosque flash. There are people outside who offer to take you on a guided tour of the Mosque but as we didn't use them can't tell you the charges or if they are any good but I did see a number of them inside with clients.

Inside is stunning and is a must visit if you are in Istanbul. There is no charge on entering but you can leave a donation as you leave. I was really looking forward to seeing the Blue Mosque but unfortunately at the moment they are doing a lot of work on the mosque so you are unable to see a lot of the inside.

Nevertheless it is still worth the visit for what you can see. Entry is free, but time are restricted during the day as it closes for prayers about three times during the day. You have to take of your shoes but you can keep them with you in a plastic bag they provide for you.

do give it a visit, it's still worth it. It was quiet a large line to get in but we expected it to be busy as blue mosque one of the more popular mosques. It was beautiful as are all the mosques in Istanbul but a large proportion can only be accessed by people praying so its not as big inside as it seems. You cant deny that it is absolutely stunning from the outside and looking at it at sunset is unbelivible.

The Blue Mosque is currently under construction so not a huge amount to see. However, it is free to enter, so it was worth the 15 minutes we spent there taking pics of what we could! It’s also in the blue mosque of Sultanahmet Square right next to Topkapi Palace and Hagia Sophia so chances are you won’t have travelled out of your way JUST for the Blue Mosque, so you’re not losing anything by popping in.

We will return in the summer when hopefully the construction is complete, along with the constructions to the Basilica Blue mosque, so we can also visit that. After seeing the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, tourists can reach another unique and dazzling mosque called Sultan Ahmed Mosque in just a very short distance and enjoy watching this masterpiece of Ottoman architecture.

And of course, it is not bad to know that this mosque was built and established by the order of Sultan Ahmad I and by a skilled master named Mohammad Sadaf, and it may be interesting to know that this mosque and the construction process and how to do it are somewhat important for Sultan Ahmad.

It was valuable that sometimes the king himself supervised the construction of the mosque until the construction of this mosque was finally completed in 1619 AD, but unfortunately a year after the construction of this masterpiece, 27- Sultan Ahmad, an Ottoman year, died and his body was outside the mosque.

He was buried, and his wife and three sons were later buried there. It should be more clear to visitors blue mosque are not there to woreship that this is under restroration. Our guide said he had been a guide since 2016 and still not seen the roof on all the photos himself.

There is actually nothing to see as everthing is boxed in and covered up. I will go back some day to see it when it is actually available. Queued in the rain for 30 minutes. Disorganised at the entrance with Shoes being removed. Once inside everything is being renovated so there is blue mosque to see, just a carpeted room with construction materials all around.

Walked around for 1 minute and then had to queue to leave for another 5/10 minutes. I recommend the Mosque should only be open to those who want to pray; and closed for tourists, as there is nothing to see inside.

I am sure once renovated it will be wonderful! Unfortunately we weren't able to see all the beauty of the Blue Mosque because of the reconstruction.

When entering the mosque it is obligatory to respect the rules, so ladies should cover their hair, and both woman and men should have their shoulders and knees covered too.

You blue mosque bay temporary covers outside for some small price, but I would recommend to carry your personal scarf to cover your hair. It has always been a dream of mine to visit the Blue Mosque blue mosque when I heard my hubby had to go to Istanbul for meetings, I had the flight booked straight away.

Blue mosque covered my head and taken off my shoes, I was nervous entering as I had it built up so much in my mind.

blue mosque

Friday prayers had just finished and there was a big rush of visitors entering at the same time causing a bit of a crush. The mosque is undergoing renovations, there is scaffolding everywhere and so it is hard to see everything but still nice to see. I was surprised at how noisy it was especially since there were still a lot of people there praying, I was taken aback at the lack of respect been shown.

I found a corner and just stood, admired the ceiling (what I could see) and soaked up the atmosphere. Glad I went but think I need to go again when it's not so busy and the renovations are finished. Although it was only just after 9 the area was already quite busy but there was no queue so we walked in, removing our shoes and then continuing to the interior of the mosque.

The mosque is a seventeenth century building, famed for the interior tile work that gives it the name. Sadly, it was undergoing restoration on this visit so the entire inside was a mass of scaffolding and hessian panelling and almost none of the tiles were visible. The remedial work on the dome was complete but the scaffolding was still there, obscuring any view.

We left after a few minutes, replaced our shoes and walked the short distance past the magnificent tulip displays to Hagia Sofia.

Sultanahmet camisi 10 dakika,ancak bölge,turizmin merkezi,günler lazım.gülhane parkı,topkapı sarayı,sultanahmet cami,külliyeler,alman çeşmesi,çemberlitaş,yere batan saray,2 dikilitaş,diğer camiler,ayasofya,kapalı çarşı,ve daha birçok yer blue mosque bölgede.önünden tramvay geçiyor.editörünü gezip binin,gülhane inin,yürümeye başlayın,sultanahmet bölgesine. and you must be dressed very conservatively or not only a head scarf but a zipped up "caftan: as they call it which is just a long shapeless zipped up dress with a hood and not really a caftan will be require-ed and they are not cleaned regularly they are used by millions of tourists so bring a headscarf and wear a long skirt.

TH HOODED DRESS WAS ACETATE AND GROSS. It is being refurbished but it is still open (6/12/19). Friday prayers it is closed most of the morning but not the afternoon except for short prayer times. Other days it is closed for 20 minutes or so at prayer times 3 or 4 times through out the day. Just go and it will tell you what times it is open. You normally don@t have to wait for more than 25 minutes and they offer a free chat about Islam with free tea and cake while you are waiting.

I'm a heathen but I found it interesting. If you do have to wait to get in, the area outside the mosque is really interesting to wander around. The Basilica cistern blue mosque close by.

£2.50 to get in and it takes about 30 minutes, a good visit and you can do that while you wait for the mosque to open. Because of the refurbishments, much of the mosque is covered in shrouds and when you go inside there is a false ceiling for the refurbishment so there is not blue mosque to see. A better visit in my view is the Sulemaniye Mosque about a 20 minute walk away. Its just as impressive, its all in tact and it has lovely gardens and a great view over the city.

All the mosques are free to enter. Добрый день дорогие путешественники!Мечеть действующая и она открыта каждый день. Реконструкции ведется перманентно, очень деликатно и ненавязчиво. С этим надо смиряться. Такие памятники веры, истории, архитектуры и религии требуют бережного поддержания. Мечеть открыта для туристов в часы, когда там не ведется служба - намаз. Бимиллях рахмани рахим. Если ошиблась - простите. A view of the Blue Mosque from Sultanahmet Square Religion Affiliation Sunni Islam Location Location Fatih, Istanbul, Turkey Geographic coordinates 41°00′19″N 28°58′37″E  /  41.0053851°N 28.9768247°E  / 41.0053851; 28.9768247 Coordinates: 41°00′19″N 28°58′37″E  /  41.0053851°N 28.9768247°E  / 41.0053851; 28.9768247 Architecture Architect(s) Sedefkâr Mehmed Agha Type Mosque Style Islamic, Late Classical Ottoman Groundbreaking 1609 ; 413 years ago ( 1609) Completed 1616 ; 406 years ago ( 1616) Specifications Capacity 10,000 Length 73 m (240 ft) Width 65 m (213 ft) Dome height (outer) 43 m (141 ft) Dome dia.

(inner) 23.50 m (77.1 ft) [1] Minaret(s) 6 Minaret height 64 m (210 ft) Materials UNESCO World Heritage Site Part of Historic Areas of Istanbul Criteria Cultural: i, ii, iii, iv Reference 356 Inscription 1985 (9th Session) Website Official website The Blue Mosque in Istanbul, also known by its official name, the Sultan Blue mosque Mosque ( Turkish: Sultan Ahmet Camii), is an Ottoman-era historical imperial mosque located in Istanbul, Turkey. A functioning mosque, it also attracts large numbers of tourist visitors.

It was constructed between 1609 and 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I. Its Külliye contains Ahmed's tomb, a madrasah and a hospice. Hand-painted blue tiles adorn the mosque’s interior walls, and at night the mosque is bathed in blue as blue mosque frame the mosque’s five main domes, six minarets and eight secondary domes. [2] It sits next to the Hagia Sophia, the principal mosque of Istanbul until the Blue Mosque's construction and another popular tourist site.

The Blue Mosque was included in the UNESCO World Heritage Site list in 1985 under the name of " Historic Areas of Istanbul". Contents • 1 History • 2 Architecture • 2.1 Interior • 2.2 Exterior • 2.3 Minarets • 3 Pope Benedict XVI's visit • 4 Gallery • 5 See also • 6 Notes • 7 Sources • 8 Further reading • 9 External links History [ edit ] After the Peace of Zsitvatorok and the crushing loss in the 1603–18 war with Persia, Sultan Ahmed I decided to build a large mosque in Istanbul to reassert Ottoman power.

It would be the first imperial mosque for more than forty years. While his predecessors had paid for their mosques with the spoils of war, Ahmed I procured funds from the Treasury, because he had not gained remarkable victories. The construction was started in 1609 and completed in 1616. [3] Having been paid from blue mosque public treasury rather than from the sultan's war booty, as was done normally, it caused the anger of the ulama, the Blue mosque jurists.

The mosque was built on the site of the palace of the Byzantine emperors, in front of the basilica Hagia Sophia (at that time, the primary imperial mosque in Istanbul) and the hippodrome, a site of significant symbolic meaning as it dominated the city skyline from the south.

Big parts of the south shore of the mosque rest on the foundations, the vaults of the old Grand Palace. [4] Architecture [ edit ] The Blue Mosque has five main domes, six minarets, and eight secondary domes.

The design blue mosque the culmination blue mosque two centuries of Ottoman mosque development. It incorporates many Byzantine elements of the neighboring Hagia Sophia with traditional Islamic architecture and is considered to blue mosque the last great mosque of the classical period. The architect, Sedefkâr Mehmed Ağa, synthesized the ideas of his master Sinan, aiming for overwhelming size, majesty and splendor. The upper area is decorated with approximately 20,000 hand-painted glazed ceramic in 60 different tulip patterns.

The lower stories are illuminated by 200 stained glass windows. The mosque is preceded by a forecourt with a large fountain and special area for ablution. An iron chain hangs in the court entrance on the western side. [5] Only the Sultan was allowed to ride into the mosque horseback, and he would need to lower his head to not hit the chain, a symbolic gesture ensuring the humility of the ruler before Allah.

[ citation needed] By way of his works he left a decided mark on Istanbul. The square on which the Blue Mosque is situated became known as Sultanahmet. This mosque can be considered the culmination of his career. Mehmed Agha, who was the last student of Mimar Sinan, had completed his mission by adding his brighter, colorful architectural style to that of his master teacher. Interior [ edit ] Exterior view of the mosque. At its lower levels and at every pier, the interior of the mosque is lined with more than 20,000 handmade İznik style ceramic tiles, made at İznik (the blue mosque Nicaea) in more than fifty different tulip designs.

The tiles at lower levels are traditional in design, while at gallery level their design becomes flamboyant with representations of flowers, fruit and cypresses. The tiles were made under the supervision of the İznik master. The price to be paid for each tile was fixed by the sultan's decree, while tile prices in general increased over time. As a result, the quality of the tiles used in the building decreased gradually. [6] Details of the central dome and the supporting domes The upper levels of the interior are dominated by blue paint.

More than 200 stained glass windows with intricate designs admit natural light, today assisted by chandeliers. On the chandeliers, ostrich eggs are found that were meant to avoid cobwebs inside the mosque by repelling spiders. [7] The decorations include verses from the Qur'an, many of them made by Seyyid Kasim Gubari, regarded as the greatest calligrapher of his blue mosque.

The floors are covered with carpets, which are donated by the faithful and are regularly replaced as they wear blue mosque. The many spacious windows confer a spacious impression. The casements at floor level are decorated with opus sectile.

blue mosque

Each exedra has five windows, some of which are blind. Each semi-dome has 14 windows and the central dome 28 (four of which are blind). The coloured glass for the windows was a gift blue mosque the Signoria of Venice to the sultan.

The most important element in the interior of the mosque is the mihrab, which is made of finely carved and sculptured marble, with a stalactite niche and a double inscriptive panel above it. It is surrounded by many windows. The adjacent walls are sheathed in ceramic tiles. To the right of the mihrab is the richly decorated minber, or pulpit, where the imam stands when he is delivering his sermon at the time of noon prayer on Fridays or on holy days. The mosque has been designed so that even when it is at its most crowded, everyone in the mosque can see and hear the imam.

[6] The royal kiosk is situated at the south-east corner. It comprises a platform, a loggia and two small retiring rooms.

It gives access to the royal loge in the south-east upper gallery of the mosque. These retiring rooms became the headquarters of the Grand Vizier during the suppression of the rebellious Janissary Corps in 1826.

The royal loge ( hünkâr mahfil) is supported by ten marble columns. It has its own mihrab, which used to be decorated with a jade rose and gilt [8] and with one hundred Qurans on an inlaid and gilded lecterns.

[9] The many lamps inside the mosque were once covered with gold and gems. [10] Among the glass bowls one could find ostrich eggs and crystal balls. [11] All these decorations have been removed or pillaged for museums. The great tablets on the walls are blue mosque with the names of the caliphs and verses from the Quran.

They were originally by the great 17th-century calligrapher Seyyid Kasim Gubari of Diyarbakır blue mosque have been repeatedly restored. [6] It was first announced that the mosque would undertake a series of renovations back in 2016. Numerous renovation works had been completed throughout Istanbul and the restoration of the Blue Mosque was to be the final project.

Renovations were expected to take place over three and a half years and be completed by 2020. Exterior [ edit ] The Blue Mosque during evening The façade of the spacious forecourt was built in the same manner as the façade of the Süleymaniye Mosque, except for the addition of the turrets on the corner domes.

The court is about as large as the mosque itself and is surrounded by a continuous vaulted arcade ( revak). It has ablution facilities on both sides. The central blue mosque fountain is small relative to the courtyard. The monumental but narrow gateway to the courtyard stands out architecturally from the arcade. Its semi-dome has a fine stalactite structure, crowned by a small ribbed dome on a tall tholobate.

Its historical elementary school (Sıbyan Mektebi) is used as "Mosque Information Centre" which is blue mosque to its outer wall on the side of Hagia Sophia.

This is where they provide visitors with a free orientational presentation on the Blue Mosque and Islam in general. [12] A heavy iron chain hangs in the upper part of the court entrance on the western side. Only the sultan was allowed to enter the court of the mosque on horseback. The chain was put there, so that the sultan had to lower his head every single time he entered the court to avoid being hit.

This was a symbolic gesture, to ensure the humility of the ruler in the face of the divine. [12] Minarets [ edit ] Minarets of the Blue Mosque The Blue Mosque is one of the five mosques in Turkey that has six minarets (one in the modern Sabancı Mosque in Adana, the Muğdat Mosque in Mersin, Çamlıca Mosque in Üsküdar and the Green mosque in Arnavutköy).

According blue mosque folklore, an architect misheard the Sultan's request for "altın minareler" (gold minarets) as "altı minare" (six minarets), at the time a unique feature of the mosque of the Ka'aba in Mecca.

When criticized for his presumption, the Sultan then ordered a seventh minaret to be built at the Mecca mosque. [13] Four minarets stand at the corners of the Blue Mosque. Each of these fluted, pencil-shaped minarets has three balconies (Called şerefe) with stalactite corbels, while the two others at the end of the forecourt only have two balconies. Before, the muezzin or prayer caller had to climb a narrow spiral staircase five times a day to announce the call to prayer.

[13] Pope Benedict XVI's visit [ edit ] Pope Benedict XVI visited the Blue Mosque on 30 November 2006 during his visit to Turkey. It was only the second papal visit in history to a Muslim place of worship.

Having removed his shoes, the Pope paused for a full two minutes, eyes closed in silent meditation, [14] standing side by side with Mustafa Çağrıcı, the Mufti of Istanbul, and Emrullah Hatipoğlu, the Imam of the Blue Mosque. [15] The pope “thanked divine Providence for this” and said, “May all believers identify themselves with the one God and bear witness to true brotherhood.” The pontiff noted that Turkey “will be a bridge of friendship and collaboration between East and West”, and he thanked the Turkish people “for the cordiality and sympathy” they showed him throughout his stay, saying, “he felt loved and understood.” [16] Gallery [ edit ] • • ^ Encyclopedia of architectural and engineering feats, Donald Langmead, Christine Garnaut, page 322, 2001 • ^ "Blue Mosque".

sultanahmetcamii.org. Retrieved 12 June 2014. • ^ Goodwin 2003, p. 343. • ^ "History". sultanahmetcamii.org. Retrieved 12 June 2014. • ^ "Architecture". sultanahmetcamii.org/architecture-of-the-mosque/. Retrieved 12 June 2014. • ^ a b c "Interior". sultanahmetcamii.org/architecture-of-the-mosque/. Retrieved 12 June 2014. • ^ "Sultan Ahmet Cami or Blue Mosque". MuslimHeritage.com. Retrieved 2012-01-26.

• ^ Öz, T., "Sultan Ahmet Camii' in Vakiflar Dergisi, I, Ankara, 1938 • ^ Efendi 1834, p. 113. • ^ Naima M., Annals of the Turkish Empire from 1591 to 1659 of the Christian Era; Frazer, London, 1832 • ^ Tournefort, J.P., Marquis de, Relation d'un voyage blue mosque Levant, Amsterdam, 1718 • ^ a b "Exterior". sultanahmetcamii.org/architecture-of-the-mosque/. Retrieved 12 June 2014. • ^ a b "Minarets". sultanahmetcamii.org/architecture-of-the-mosque/.

Retrieved 12 June 2014. • ^ "Pope Benedict XVI Visits Turkey's Famous Blue Mosque". Fox News.

blue mosque

2006-11-30. Retrieved 2011-10-19. • ^ "Pope makes Turkish mosque visit". BBC News. 2006-11-30. Retrieved 2012-01-26. • ^ "Pope: In mosque I prayed to the one God for all mankind". Asianews.it. 2006-06-12. Retrieved 2012-01-26. Sources [ edit ] • Efendi, Evliya (1834). Narrative of Travels in Europe, Asia, and Africa, in the Seventeenth Century.

Vol. 1. trans. Ritter Joseph Von Hammer. London: Printed for the Oriental translation fund of Great Britain and Ireland. • Goodwin, Godfrey (2003) [1971]. A History of Ottoman Architecture. London: Thames & Hudson.

ISBN 978-0-500-27429-3. The Inside Track, On the Go Tours. Further reading [ edit ] • Sheila S. Blair, Jonathan M. Bloom – "The Art and Architecture of Islam, 1250–1800", Yale University Press, 1994; ISBN 0-300-05888-8 • Turner, J. (ed.) – Grove Dictionary of Art – Oxford University Press, USA; New edition (January 2, 1996); ISBN 0-19-517068-7 • Kantar, Billur Mine (2014).

"The Blue Interpretation of Art: The Blue Mosque" (PDF). Turkish Neurosurgery. 24 (4): 445–450. PMID 25050664. External links [ edit ] Wikimedia Commons has media related to Sultan Ahmed Mosque. • Website of the Blue Mosque, Istanbul • Photographs by Dick Osseman, PBase • Aksaray • Akşemsettin blue mosque Alemdar • Ali Kuşçu • Atikali • Ayvansaray • Balabanağa • Balat • Beyazıt • Binbirdirek • Cankurtaran • Cerrahpaşa • Cibali • Demirtaş • Derviş Ali • Eminsinan blue mosque Hacıkadın • Hasekisultan • Hırkaişerif • Hobyar • Hoca Gıyasettin • Hocapaşa • İskenderpaşa • Kalenderhane • Karagümrük • Katip Kasım • Kemalpaşa • Küçükayasofya • Kocamustafapaşa • Mercan • Mesihpaşa • Mevlanakapı • Mimar Hayrettin • Mimar Kemalettin • Mollafenari • Mollagürani • Mollahüsrev • Muhsinehatun • Nişanca • Rüstempaşa • Saraçishak • Sarıdemir • Seyyid Ömer • Silivrikapı • Sultanahmet • Sururi • Süleymaniye • Sümbülefendi • Şehremini • Şehsuvarbey • Tahtakale • Tayahatun • Topkapı • Yavuzsinan • Yavuz Sultan Selim • Yedikule • Zeyrek Quarters • Ahırkapı • Altımermer • Ayakapı • Bahçekapı • Belgradkapı • Büyüklanga • Cağaloğlu • Çapa • Çarşıkapı • Çatladıkapı • Çarşamba • Çemberlitaş • Çukurbostan • Draman • Edirnekapı • Eğrikapı • Eminönü • Fener • Fındıkzade • Gedikpaşa • Haseki • Horhor • İmrahor • Kadırga • Kıztaşı • Küçükmustafapaşa • Küçükpazar • Kumkapı • Küçüklanga • Laleli • Mahmutpaşa • Narlıkapı • Nuruosmaniye • Pazartekke • Samatya • Saraçhane • Sarayburnu • Sirkeci • Sofular • Sulukule • Şehzadebaşı • Taşkasap • Unkapanı • Vefa • Vezneciler • Yenikapı • Yusufpaşa Landmarks • Beyazıt Square • Beyazıt Tower • Bulgarian St.

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• Math Tutoring • Math Tutoring • Science Tutoring • Science Tutoring • Business Tutoring • Business Tutoring • Humanities Tutoring • Humanities Tutoring • Algebra Tutoring • Calculus Tutoring • Geometry Tutoring • Pre-calculus Tutoring • Statistics Tutoring • Trigonometry Tutoring • All Math Tutoring • Biology Tutoring • Chemistry Tutoring • Physics Tutoring • All Science Tutoring • Accounting Tutoring • Economics Tutoring • Finance Tutoring • All Business Tutoring • History Tutoring • Literature Tutoring • Writing Tutoring • All Humanities Tutoring • Blue mosque Up Create an account At a time of his life when most of us are attending middle school, Sultan Ahmet I of the Ottoman Empire had a vision of architectural grandeur.

Rather than wallow in a recent military defeat, the 13-year-old sultan commissioned a grand mosque in his capital city of Istanbul, perched atop a hill overlooking the waters of the Bosphorus. The Blue Mosque, as it blue mosque come to be known, is still one of Istanbul, Turkey's most famous monuments, with a history wrapped in artistic achievement and political controversy.

Origins of the Blue Mosque The Sultan Ahmet Mosque, also known as the Blue Mosque, is a prominent landmark and symbol of Istanbul, Turkey. It has been an outlier since its conception.

Unlike many great works of architecture, which are often built to commemorate a victory or other national triumph, the Blue Mosque was commissioned after a Turkish military defeat in the early 1600's. Sultan Ahmet I After the Ottoman Turks, as they were known at the time, lost a war to the Persians, their leader, 13-year-old Sultan Ahmet I, decided to build the massive mosque as a way to reassure the Turks of their empire's glory.

He envisioned a mosque unlike any built for decades. Unfortunately, the Ottomans lacked the riches that a military victory would normally bring, and the sultan struggled to fund his vision. Controversy swirled around the mosque's construction, especially at a time when many Turkish villagers lived in poverty.

• Lesson • Quiz • Course 7.2K views Exterior Architecture Sultan Ahmet I won out in the end, and the Blue Mosque now sits perched atop a hill that was once home to blue mosque Grand Palace of Constantinople of the Byzantine Empire.

It is also situated strategically across from Hagia Sophia, a former Orthodox Christian church that had been converted into the Ottoman's main imperial mosque.

One prominent feature of the Blue Mosque is its minarets - tall, narrow towers around the outside of a mosque where muezzins traditionally call the faithful to prayer five times a day. Sultan Ahmet I wanted to make sure his mosque was indeed grand and commissioned a design with six minarets. Though the number of minarets on a mosque can vary, five was usually the maximum at the time. An exterior view of the Blue Mosque Folklore has it that the sultan asked for golden minarets, but his designer confused his request with six since the words sound similar in Turkish.

Whatever the reason, some people thought this ambitious design bordered on blasphemy since the only other mosque to have six minarets was blue mosque Ka'aba in Mecca, the holiest site in Islam. Sultan Ahmet paid for a seventh minaret to be built in Mecca, and the controversy ended. The Blue Mosque is one of three mosques in Turkey to have six minarets today.

Four minarets stand on the corners of the mosque and two others at the end of the front courtyard. Traditionally, muezzins climbed the steep narrow stairs within the minarets and sang to the citizens of Istanbul to come to pray. In modern times, the muezzins have been replaced with loudspeakers.

In addition to the minarets, the exterior of the Blue Mosque features five main domes and eight smaller domes. A large square and gate also sit between the mosque and the equally impressive Hagia Sophia, with which it shares the hilltop. The square is also home to a mausoleum, elementary school and madrassa, or Islamic school.

Interior Architecture Inside the mosque, it's easy to see where the Sultan Ahmet Mosque gets its nickname. The walls are lined with tens of thousands of Iznik ceramic tiles. These tiles are made of ceramic from the Turkey's Anatolia region and depict images of trees, flowers and other plants, all styled in shades of blues.

Above the tiles, there is additional blue paint. The interior of the Blue Mosque A careful viewer might notice that as their gaze moves up, the higher tiles are more simply decorated than the ornate lower levels. This is because the mosque took more than a decade to build, and tile prices increased over time. Maybe the builders hoped that visitors would not notice the decrease in quality of those higher tiles. In addition to the tiles, the walls are decorated with verses from the Qu'ran written in the graceful calligraphy of Seyyid Blue mosque Gubari, a great Turkish calligrapher.

Though the Blue Mosque is a huge structure, designers used natural light to make the cavernous interior space feel bright and welcoming. Hundreds of stained glass blue mosque make the walls appear bright and graceful rather than blue mosque like stone. Chandeliers contribute to the light of the stained glass windows. If one looks carefully, there are ostrich eggs balanced on the chandeliers.

blue mosque

Ostrich eggs were believed to repel spiders from the building and reduce blue mosque. Modern-day Connections Today, the Blue Mosque still functions as place of worship as well as a major tourist attraction.

In 2006, it was also the site of the second visit to a Muslim holy place by a pope when Pope Benedict XVI visited as part of a goodwill tour of the region. Summary The Sultan Ahmet Mosque, or Blue Mosque, has dominated its hilltop in Istanbul for centuries.

blue mosque

Commissioned by Ottoman Sultan Ahmet I, it was plagued by controversy since he did not have the funds to pay for it. It is notable for its six-minaret design (most mosques have five) and for its blue ceramic tiled interior. It continues to function as a mosque today and as a blue mosque place for tourists and world leaders alike.

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The Blue Mosque (Called Sultanahmet Camii in Turkish) is an historical mosque in Istanbul.

The blue mosque is known as the Blue Mosque because of blue tiles surrounding the walls of interior design.Mosque was built between 1609 and 1616 years, during the rule of Ahmed I. just like many other mosques, it also comprises a tomb of the founder, a madrasa and a hospice.Besides still used as a mosque, the Sultan Ahmed Mosque has also become a popular tourist attraction in Istanbul.

Besides being tourist attraction, it's also a active mosque, so it's closed to non worshippers for a half hour or so during the five daily prayers. Best way to see great architecture of the Blue Mosque is to approach it from the Hippodrome. (West side of the mosque) As if you are non-Muslim visitor, you blue mosque have to use same direction to enter the Mosque.

​​ Please ignore and avoid people who offer you to enter mosque without queue up. Those people mostly will try to sell you something and take you to the some shopping place. Best way is to line up and enter Mosque just like other tourists. Don't worry if line looks very long, it will move very fast for sure.

Tourists always wonder how to visit Blue Mosque.There is also blue mosque other questions such as if blue mosque is any entrance fee,dress code, where to put my shoes etc.Here below is the answers of all these simple questions. ​ 1) Plan your visit to the Sultanahmet area of Istanbul, so that you better arrive mid morning. Pray happens five times a day with the first call to prayer at sunrise and the last one at nightfall.The mosque closes for 90 minutes at each pray time.Avoid visiting a mosque at pray time (Especially Midday praying on Friday) or within a half hour after the ezan is chanted from the Mosque minarets.

2) Before step in to Mosque, take off your shoes and put in plastic bags provided at the entrance(Free of Charge). This is required of all persons as part of Muslim tradition when entering a mosque. There is also no charge to enter the Blue Mosque.

3) If you are women wear a head covering when entering to Blue Mosque.Head coverings are available at the Blue Mosque entrance for free.

Place the fabric cover on top of your head with equal portions hanging on both sides. Take one side and wrap it around your neck, tossing it behind your back with covering your shoulders.

Don't cover your face, the covering is meant to hide your hair only. 4) When you are inside the mosque, remain quiet and don't use flash photography.Since this is a place of worship, avoid staring or taking picture of those blue mosque are praying.Visit the mosque respectfully and quietly.At the Mosque exit, you can put used plastic bags in designated bin bags and return head covers to duty staff.

5) You can do donation to help maintain the Mosque at the exit door.It is not compulsory, but if you make donation you will get the official receipt for it. About Istanbul Blue Mosque Hippodrome Topkapi Palace Hagia Sophia Sogukcesme Street Little Hagia Sophia Basilica Cistern Turkish & Islamic Arts Museum Arasta Bazaar Gulhane Park Archaeology Museum Old City Walls Suleymaniye Mosque Eyup Sultan Kalenderhane Mosque Pierre Loti Hill Miniaturk Museum Panorama 1453 Chora Museum Seven Tower Dungeons Grand Bazaar Sahaflar Bazaar Mahmut Pasha Bazaar Spice Bazaar New Mosque Rustem Pasha Mosque Tekfur Palace Galata Tower Galata Dervish Lodge Emirgan Park Yildiz Royal Garden Maiden’s Tower Dolmabahce Palace Beylerbeyi Palace Ciragan Palace Rumeli Fortress Anatolian Fortress Khedive Pavilion Ihlamur Pavilion Yusha Mosque Kadikoy Bazaar Camlica Hill • BURSAThe Mosque of Sultan Ahmed, also known as The Blue Mosque (Called Sultanahmet Camii in Turkish) one of the most majestic Ottoman Mosques in all of Turkey locates at the Sultanahmet area of Istanbul, the one and only mosque in Istanbul with six minarets.

The Sultan Ahmed, the Blue Mosque, was built between 1609 and 1616 A.D. during the reign of Sultan Ahmed I. the design and envision was projected by The Architect Mehmet Ağa, blue mosque by Sultan Ahmet I.

The mosque followed the traditional architectural style of the Islamic architecture in comprising a mausoleum, madrasa ( school), and a hospice. The mosque is still actively used for daily blue mosque congregational prayers of Fridays, additionally, it became a popular tourist attraction in Istanbul. Sultan Ahmet I Reign and Achievements The structure was planned to be built between the Hagia Sophia and the Byzantine Hippodrome near the Ottoman royal residence, Topkapı Palace.

However, it's closed to non-Muslims for 90 minutes at each pray time or so during the five daily prayers and two hours during Friday noon prayers. Sultan Ahmet I was enthroned at the age of 13 years old over an empire spanning parts of three continents—Asia, Europe, and Africa from The capital city, Istanbul.

He aimed to make a landmark on the city, so he ordered one of the finest mosques in the heart of the imperial city to be built for him prior to the untimely death of its then 27-year old eponymous patron, Sultan Ahmet I. The magnificent mosque of Istanbul of the majestic city attraction with its elegant composition of ascending domes and six slender soaring minarets.

The mosque is giving a panoramic view through its hippodrome. A mistake produced A Masterpiece The Blue Mosque was designed to reflect the imperial strength of the ruler to complement the imposing Hagia Sophia, what is clearly exposed in its elephant feet representation pillars, the central dome which is surrounded by a cluster of smaller semi-domes. The mosque took more than over 20,000 handmade ceramic Iznik tiles that decorate the interior, different floral motives and the place got its light through more than 260 windows with stained glass.

The most distinctive architectural elements of this Istanbul mosque is its six minarets, as opposed to the usual two or four of most of the city’s mosques. The story behind the magnificent minarets seems to have a misunderstanding story, as the sultan asked golden minarets ( altın minaret ) to be built, but the architect wrongly got it altı minaret (six minarets).

The result made the Sultan upset so instead of fixing the mosque of Turkey - Istanbul, a new 7th minaret was ordered to be added to Prophet’s mosque in Mecca. The Blue Mosque Architecture and Decorative project The mosque features two major sections: First, the large unified prayer hall crowned by the main dome and an equally spacious courtyard.

In contrast to earlier imperial mosques in Istanbul, the monotony of the exterior stone walls is relieved through numerous windows and a blind arcade. Huge elevated and recessed entrances penetrate three sides of its precinct to provide access to the sacred core, calligraphy art of Koranic verses.

The courtyard’s inner frame is a domed arcade, which is uniform on all sides except for the prayer hall entrance where blue mosque arches expand. Four of the blue mosque minarets are positioned on the corners of the mosque’s prayer hall while the other two flanks the external corners of the courtyard. Each of these "pencil" minarets has a series of balconies adorning its lean form. To extend the prayer hall of the mosque a series of half domed ceilings were built to join the exterior wall of the mosque.

blue mosque

An arcaded gallery blue mosque along the interior walls except on blue mosque qibla wall facing Mecca. A marble Mihrab set into the center of this wall guides the faithful to the correct direction for prayer. To the right side, a tall and thin marble pulpit (minbar).

The decorative elements of the mosque included geometric bands and organic medallions of bright reds and blues, now replaced with artificial ones. There are 3 entrances to the mosque, and after entering inside one gets shocked by the floral and geometrical interiors. When visiting the mosque, keep in mind to take off your shoes, as part of Muslim tradition when entering a mosque. The major historical city and second Capital of Turkey, Istanbul, comprising more historical attractions including the Hagia Sophia, Topkapi Palace, the Archeology Museum, the Basilica Cistern and the Grand Bazaar.

The Blue Mosque of Sultan Ahmed is always opened for visits except for blue mosque Muslim prayer times. The Entrance is Free of Charge, all that you should follow is the Muslim dress code for women to be body and hair covering.
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