George smith

george smith

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See all related content → George Smith, (born March 26, 1840, London, Eng.—died Aug. 19, 1876, Aleppo, Syria), English Assyriologist who advanced knowledge of the earliest (Sumerian) period of Mesopotamian civilization with his discovery of one of the most important literary works in Akkadian, the Epic of Gilgamesh. Moreover, its description of a flood, strikingly similar to the account in Genesis, had a stunning effect on Smith’s generation.

george smith

Apprenticed as a bank note engraver at the age of 14, Smith educated himself in the young science of Assyriology and became adept in deciphering the cuneiform tablets from Nineveh that began arriving at the British Museum, London, about 1861.

His publication of several essays on cuneiform characters of uncertain meaning attracted attention, and soon he became an assistant in the museum’s department of Oriental antiquities.

While preparing inscriptions for publication, george smith was startled to find part of a description of a flood. His report of this discovery prompted The Daily Telegraph of London to sponsor an expedition to find george smith missing fragment needed to complete the deluge account. In May 1873, on the fifth day of digging at Nineveh, Smith found the fragment.

His Chaldean Account of Genesis (1876) became one of the best-selling books of its time. This article was most recently revised and updated by Amy Tikkanen. Smith during a Stade Français training session Date of birth ( 1980-07-14) 14 July 1980 (age 41) Place of birth Manly, Australia Height 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) Weight 103 kg (227 lb; 16 st 3 lb) School Cromer Campus Notable relative(s) Tyrone Smith (brother) Occupation(s) Retired rugby player Rugby union career Position(s) Flanker, Number 8 Senior career Years Team Apps (Points) 1999–2013 Brumbies 142 (90) 2010–2011 Toulon 30 (5) 2011–2017 Suntory Sungoliath 67 (87) 2012 Stade Français 8 (5) 2014–2015 Lyon OU 25 (15) 2015–2016 Wasps 26 (5) 2017–2018 Queensland Reds 22 (10) 2018–2019 Bristol 23 (0) George smith as of 21 May 2019 George Smith AM (born 14 July 1980) is a retired Australian rugby union player.

He was a flanker for Bristol Bears, though he is more known for his 12 years (2000–10,13) at the ACT Brumbies in Super Rugby, earning 142 caps. [1] He made his test debut in 2000 against France in Paris and earning 111 caps for Australia, [1] 110 before retiring from international rugby on 5 February 2010 and one final cap against the British & Irish Lions on 6 July 2013.

He is the second most capped Wallaby forward behind Nathan Sharpe, and is the second most capped flanker in rugby union behind Richie McCaw.

[ citation needed] Contents • 1 Early life and junior career • 2 Senior career • 2.1 Brumbies and Australia: 2000–2010 • 2.2 Toulon, Stade Français and George smith 2011–2013 • 2.3 Brumbies and Lions Series: 2013 • 2.4 Lyon and Wasps: 2014–2016 • 2.5 Queensland Reds and Suntory: 2016–2018 • 2.6 Bristol: 2018–2019 • 3 Personal life • 4 George smith also • 5 References • 6 External links • 7 Bibliography Early life and junior career [ edit ] Smith was born in Manly, Sydney.

george smith

He began playing rugby with george smith Manly Roos/Warringah Roos, [2] before moving on to play the majority of his junior career with the Manly Vikings, and Tupou College in Tonga, playing a year above his age group in the Sydney junior rugby competition. Once that team had reached its age limit (18 years old) and moved on to the colts competition, Smith remained in the Sydney junior rugby competition, this time lining up in his correct age group for the Seaforth-Balgowlah Raiders.

He then progressed to playing in the Manly 1st grade Colts side who also won a premiership in 1999. It was during that season that Smith made his first grade debut at Nepean Rugby Park against The Penrith Emus.

During his junior career he george smith selected for many representative teams, including Manly, Sydney, Northern Zone, NSW, and Australian Under 16s.

Smith also had a successful school career, first at Balgowlah Boys High School, then at Cromer High School, where, along with Tongan international John Payne, he won the Australian Schools Championship.

He played for the Australian Schoolboys team in 1998. [3] Senior career [ edit ] Brumbies and Australia: 2000–2010 [ edit ] He was signed to the ACT Brumbies by Eddie Jones in 1999.

[4] He made his Super 12 debut in just his first year of professional rugby in 2000, playing against george smith Sharks, [1] and he scored a try in the Brumbies Super 12 final loss to the Canterbury Crusaders.

george smith

In a remarkable year, Smith was also capped for the first time in the Wallabies end of season tour against France. Smith was a key player for the Wallabies from 2000–09. George smith was often voted Players' Player of the Year, [5] awarded for fair-play by his teammates and officials. He has recently been chosen as a member of the Wallaby Team of the Decade, a remarkable feat considering his age and one of only three current players picked.

george smith

In 2002, he was the first recipient of the John Eales Medal, awarded by the Australian Rugby Union and the Rugby Union Players' Association to their Player of the Year. [6] He won Australian Super 14 Player of the Year four years in a row between 2006 and 2009. [7] In 2007 the breakdown specialist capped off another remarkable season claiming awards including: the Brett Robinson Award as the Brumbies' Players' Player for the fifth consecutive year; [8] Super 14 Player of the Year; [9] and the Rugby Union Players' Association 'Rugby Medal for Excellence'.

These recognitions underlined his position as one of rugby's most respected players, reinforced further when he became the Wallabies 75th captain, against Canada at the 2007 Rugby World Cup. 2008 was a big year for Smith. He captained the George smith and the Wallabies and became the first player to win the John Eales Medal, twice.

In addition, Smith won the "Super 14 Player of the Year Award", for the third consecutive year and the Brett Robinson Award as the Brumbies' Players' Player of the year for the sixth consecutive year. [10] He also reached a personal milestone during the season, when he made his 100th Super Rugby appearance against the Cheetahs in round six. In a memorable double for the Smith family, George's younger brother, George smith teammate Tyrone, was named rookie of the year. In the international arena, the older Smith also became both the most capped flanker and the most capped forward – the latter being previously held by John Eales.

On 5 February 2010, Smith announced his retirement from international rugby. 2010 was expected to be his last in Super Rugby. [11] Smith celebrated with george smith achievement of his 9th Brumbies Players' Player of the Year, with eight of those awards being consecutive.

[12] Toulon, Stade Français and Suntory: 2011–2013 [ edit ] In June 2010, Smith signed a one-year contract with French Top 14 club Toulon. [13] His RC Toulonnais teammates included former Highlander and All Black prop Carl Hayman, [14] george smith and former Brumbies' scrum-half Matt Henjak.

Later in 2010 he was selected in the French Barbarians to play at blindside flanker (number 6) against Tonga. [16] Smith played for the Australia XV team alongside fellow Tongan, Lisiate Tafa, in the Southern Hemisphere Charity Fundraiser in March 2011 against the Pacific Barbarians.

[17] In the following month Smith become the highest paid Australian rugby player by signing with Japanese club, Suntory Sungoliath, on a $3.3 million three-year deal. [4] He joined Stade Français in 2012 on a short-term contract for the end of their Top 14 and European Challenge Cup seasons.

[18] Brumbies and Lions Series: 2013 [ edit ] In george smith 2013 the Brumbies announced that Smith would return to Australia on a short term contract for the 2013 Super Rugby season. [19] [20] This followed Ita Vaea's season-ending injury. Smith gained the approval of his Japanese club Sungoliath for george smith 12-week stint back in Australia.

[21] Smith was recalled to the Australian squad in June that year for the series against the British & Irish Lions, after recovering from a knee injury. [22] After being overlooked for the second test, Smith was named as the starting george smith side flanker for the third and deciding test in Sydney. [23] It was his first test since retiring from international rugby in February 2010 and broke Colin Meads' record of 4382 days between his first test against the Lions, and his last.

[ citation needed] Lyon and Wasps: 2014–2016 [ edit ] After leaving French club Lyon on their relegation to the Pro D2, Smith made a move to England to sign for Wasps in the Aviva Premiership from the 2015–16 season.

george smith

{INSERTKEYS} [24] During his season with Wasps, Smith won a number of awards; including Wasps' Players' Player of the Year, Wasps' Player of the Year, [25] Aviva Premiership Players' Player of the Year [26] and Green Flag Forward of the Season. [27] During his spell in England, Smith was also involved in the England coaching setup during the 2016 Six Nations Championship [28] Queensland Reds and Suntory: 2016–2018 [ edit ] In mid 2016 it was confirmed that Smith would leave Wasps in England to return to Japanese club Suntory Sungoliath, [29] and that he would also play for the Queensland Reds in the 2017 and 2018 Super Rugby seasons.

[30] On 13 July 2018, Smith played his final home game for Queensland Reds, having initially been ruled out with a knee injury. This was his final professional game in Australia.

Bristol: 2018–2019 [ edit ] Smith joined the Bristol Bears in England for their 2018–19 Premiership Rugby season. [31] He retired from professional rugby at the end of that season.

[32] [33] Personal life [ edit ] Smith, who is of Tongan background, is the older brother of fellow Brumbies player and Tongan rugby league international Tyrone Smith. He was easily recognised on the field by his dreadlocked hair style until late 2006 – when he decided to sell his dreadlocks for charity. [34] They were given to a charity for younger people with cancer. Smith was the face of the Australian version of Electronic Arts' video game Rugby 2005.

He was made a Member of the Order of Australia in 2012. [35] See also [ edit ] • ^ a b c "George Smith Player Profile". Brumbies Media. Archived from the original on 28 August 2013 . Retrieved 26 October 2013. • ^ Jon Geddes.

The Daily Telegraph. 26 March 2010. Retrieved 24 January 2015 • ^ Brave and Game (2010). "Nurseries of Australian Schoolboys' Rugby" (PDF). Australian Schools Rugby Union. Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 March 2012 .

Retrieved 27 June 2012. • ^ a b Guinness, Rupert (25 April 2011). "By George: $3.3m deal sees Smith become Australia's highest paid player". Sydney Morning Herald. Faifax . Retrieved 26 October 2013. • ^ "Super 14 Awards – Congratulations". Rugby Union Players Association. Archived from the original on 20 August 2006. • ^ "The John Eales Medal". Rugby Union Players Association. 31 August 2006. Archived from the original on 12 June 2007 .

Retrieved 31 August 2006. • ^ "Smith crowned player of series". Fox Sports. News. 1 June 2006. Archived from the original on 22 August 2006 . Retrieved 31 August 2006. • ^ "Brumbies vote Smith the best". Fox Sports. News. AAP. 14 July 2007 . Retrieved 1 March 2013. • ^ Flanker George Smith wins Super 14 Australian player of the series award – International Herald Tribune • ^ "Smith wins sixth successive honour". Fox Sports. News. AAP. 11 July 2008 . Retrieved 1 March 2013.

• ^ Ed, Jackson (5 February 2010). "Wallabies flanker George Smith retires from international rugby". Fox Sports. News. AAP . Retrieved 1 March 2013. • ^ "Smith claims ninth and final Brett Robinson Award". Brumbies Media. 2 July 2010. Archived from the original on 26 February 2011 . Retrieved 26 October 2013. • ^ "George Smith signs for Toulon".

Planet Rugby. 3 June 2010. Archived from the original on 8 June 2010 . Retrieved 4 June 2010. {/INSERTKEYS}

george smith

• ^ "Toulon swoop for George Smith". Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax. 3 June 2010. Retrieved 4 June 2010. • ^ "Toulon swoop for George Smith". News. Radio New Zealand. 4 June 2010. Retrieved 4 June 2010. • ^ "Classic Encounters – French Barbarians vs Tonga in Grenoble". 3 December 2010. • ^ "Antipodean sport in London unites to raise quake and flood money".

Australian Times. Archived from the original on 21 October 2019. Retrieved 21 October 2019. • ^ "George Smith to join Stade Francais". The Sydney Morning Herald. 21 March 2012. Retrieved 21 October 2019. • ^ Brumbies Media Unit (25 February 2013).

"George Smith sets for Brumbies Rugby return" (Press release). Brumbies. Archived from the original on 1 February 2014. Retrieved 25 February 2013. • ^ "Another legend returns to Brumbies". Rugby 365. 25 February 2013. Retrieved 26 February 2013. • ^ ABC (25 February 2013). "Brumbies sign George Smith". ABC Grandstand. Australia: ABC. Reuters. Retrieved 25 February george smith. • ^ ARU (23 June 2013). "George Smith Called into Squad" (Press release).

Retrieved 3 July 2013. • ^ Dutton, George smith (4 July 2013). "George Smith leads changes to Wallabies". Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax. Retrieved 4 July 2013. • ^ "Wasps sign veteran Wallabies flanker George Smith". Sky Sports. 25 May 2015. Retrieved 14 September 2015. • ^ "Aviva Premiership". premiershiprugby.com. Retrieved 8 June 2016.

• ^ "George Smith honoured by Premiership players". 12 May 2016. • ^ "George Smith named Green Flag Forward of the Season". wasps.co.uk. Retrieved 8 June 2016. • ^ Lake, Jefferson (20 January 2016). "George Smith 'to help out' Eddie Jones' England coaching team". • ^ "Aussie veteran George Smith flys back to Japan".

ARU News. 16 May 2016. Retrieved 30 May 2016. • ^ Newman, Paul (10 June 2016). "George Smith to join Queensland Reds for 2017 and 2018 Super Rugby seasons". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 21 George smith 2019. • ^ "Wallabies legend George Smith joins Bristol Bears". Bristol Bears. 20 June 2018. Archived from the original on 21 June 2018. • ^ "George Smith: Ex-Australia captain retires after ending career at Bristol".

British Broadcasting Corporation. 21 May 2019. Archived from the original on 9 June 2019. • ^ "Bristol Bears show how despite having one foot out the door, legend George Smith still played his role". RugbyDump.com. 20 May 2019. Archived from the original on 5 June 2019. • ^ Guinness, Rupert (20 September 2006). "By George, hair we go for charity". Daily Telegraph. News Limited. Retrieved 4 June 2010. • ^ "26 January 2012".

AustralianBroadcasting Corporation. 26 January 2012. Archived from the original on 26 January 2012. External links [ edit ] • Stats on It's rugby • Wallabies Profile • ESPNscrum Profile Bibliography [ edit ] • Guinness, Rupert (2011). George Smith: The Biography. Allen & Unwin. ISBN 9781742374345. Preceded by Hidden categories: • Articles with short description • Short description matches Wikidata • Use Australian English from January 2014 • All Wikipedia articles written in Australian English • Use dmy dates from March 2020 • Short description is different from Wikidata • All articles with unsourced statements • Articles with unsourced statements from December 2017 • Articles with unsourced statements from July 2013 • Articles with ISNI identifiers • Articles with VIAF identifiers • Articles with WORLDCATID identifiers • Articles with LCCN identifiers Edit links • This page was last edited on 29 April 2022, at 04:42 (UTC).

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George Smith Partners does not guarantee its accuracy. Treasury and SWAP spreads are updated frequently but may not reflect actual rates. Hot Money • Fixed Rate Bridge Financing • Multifamily Permanent Financing george smith Fixed for Five Years • Non-Recourse Build For Rent Construction Financing • Forward Rate Lock Protection • Non-Recourse Small Balance Bridge Financing up to $30,000,000 – 75% LTV/90% LTC • $1,000,000 – $5,000,000 Preferred Equity Checks, Up to 90% LTC More Hot Money Tel 310.557.8336 Fax george smith Email taugust@gspartners.com Contact Us Constellation Place, 10250 Constellation Blvd., Ste.

2700, Los Angeles, CA 90067 Cookie Policy Privacy Policy Terms & Conditions Manage Cookie Preferences Do Not Sell My Info © george smith - 2022 George Smith Partners, Inc. All Rights Reserved - Website by Facility Aleppo, Syria Nationality British Known for Discovered and translated the Epic of Gilgamesh Scientific career Fields Assyriology Institutions British Museum George Smith (26 March 1840 – 19 August 1876) was a pioneering English Assyriologist who first discovered and translated the Epic of Gilgamesh, one of the oldest-known written works of literature.

[1] Contents • 1 Early life and early career • 2 British Museum • 3 Discovery of inscriptions • 4 Epic of Gilgamesh and expedition to Nineveh • 5 Final expedition and death • 6 Bibliography • 7 References • 8 Notes • 9 External links Early life and early career [ edit ] As the son of a working-class family in Victorian England, Smith was limited in his ability to acquire a formal education.

[2] At age fourteen, he was apprenticed to the London-based publishing house of Bradbury and Evans to learn banknote engraving, at which george smith excelled.

george smith

From his youth, he was fascinated with Assyrian culture and history. In his spare time, he george smith everything that was available to him on the subject. His interest was so keen that while working at the printing firm, he spent his lunch hours at the British Museum, studying publications on the cuneiform tablets that had been unearthed near Mosul in present-day Iraq by Austen Henry Layard, Henry Rawlinson, and Hormuzd Rassam, during the archaeological expeditions of 1840–1855.

george smith

In 1863 Smith married Mary Clifton (1835–1883), and they had six children. British Museum [ edit ] Smith's natural talent for cuneiform studies was first noticed by Samuel Birch, Egyptologist and Director of the Department of Antiquities, who brought the young man to the attention of the renowned Assyriologist Sir Henry Rawlinson.

As early as 1861, he was working evenings sorting and cleaning the mass of friable fragments of clay cylinders and tablets in the Museum's storage rooms. [3] In 1866 Smith made his first important discovery, the date of the george smith of the tribute by Jehu, king of Israel, to Shalmaneser III.

Sir Henry suggested to the Trustees of the Museum that Smith should join him in the preparation george smith the third and fourth volumes of The Cuneiform Inscriptions of Western Asia. [4] Following the death of William H. Coxe in 1869 and with letters of reference from Rawlinson, Layard, William Henry Fox Talbot, and Edwin Norris, Smith was appointed Senior Assistant in the Assyriology Department early in 1870.

Discovery of inscriptions [ edit ] Smith's earliest successes were the discoveries of two unique inscriptions early in 1867.

The first, a total eclipse of the sun in the month of Sivan inscribed on Tablet K51, he linked to the spectacular eclipse that occurred on 15 June 763 BC, george smith description of which had been published 80 years earlier by French historian François Clément (1714–1793) in L'art de vérifier les dates des faits historiques.

[5] This discovery is the cornerstone of ancient Near Eastern chronology. The other was the date of an invasion of Babylonia by the Elamites in 2280 BC. In 1871, Smith published Annals of Assur-bani-pal, transliterated and translated, and communicated to the newly founded Society of Biblical Archaeology a paper on "The Early History of Babylonia", and an account of his decipherment of the Cypriote inscriptions.

Epic of Gilgamesh and expedition to Nineveh [ edit ] Translation of Ashurbanipal's " The First Egytian War" from the Rassam cylinder. [6] In 1872, Smith achieved worldwide fame by his translation of the Chaldaean account of the Great Flood, which he read before the Society of Biblical Archaeology on 3 December. The audience included the sitting prime george smith, William Ewart Gladstone.

[7] According to the accounts of his coworkers in the reading room, on the day of the discovery, when Smith realized what he was reading he "began to remove articles of his clothing" and run around the room shouting in delight.

[8] This work george smith better known today as the eleventh tablet of the Epic of Gilgamesh, one of the oldest known works of literature, discovered by Hormuzd Rassam in 1853 on an archeological mission for the British Museum on behalf of his colleague and mentor Austen Henry Layard. The following January, Edwin Arnold, the editor of The Daily Telegraph, arranged for Smith to go to Nineveh at the expense of that newspaper and carry out excavations with a view to finding the missing fragments of the Flood george smith.

This journey resulted not only in the discovery of some missing tablets, but also of fragments that recorded the succession and duration of the Babylonian dynasties. In November 1873 Smith again left England for Nineveh for a second expedition, this time at the expense of the Museum, and continued his excavations at the tell of Kouyunjik (Nineveh). An account of his work is given in Assyrian Discoveries, published early in 1875.

The rest of the year was spent in fixing together and translating the fragments relating to the creation, the results of which were published in The Chaldaean George smith of Genesis (1880, co-written with Archibald Sayce). Final expedition and death [ edit ] In March 1876, the trustees of the British Museum sent Smith once more to excavate the rest of the Library of Ashurbanipal.

At Ikisji, a small village about sixty miles northeast of Aleppo, he fell ill with dysentery. He died in Aleppo on 19 August. He left a wife and several children to whom an annuity of 150 pounds was granted by the Queen.

george smith

Bibliography [ edit ] Smith wrote about eight important works, [9] including linguistic studies, historical works, and translations of major Mesopotamian literary texts. They include: • George Smith (1871). History of Assurbanipal, translated from the cuneiform inscriptions. • George Smith (1875). Assyrian Discoveries: An Account of Explorations and Discoveries on the Site of Nineveh, During 1873 to 1874 • George Smith (1876).

The Chaldean Account of Genesis • George Smith (1878), Sayce, A.H (ed.), History of Sennacherib: Translated from the Cuneiform Inscriptions, London: Williams & Norgate george smith George Smith (18–).

The History of Babylonia. Edited by Archibald Henry Sayce. Online editions • History of Assurbanipal, translated from the cuneiform george smith. London: Williams and Norgate, 1871. From Google Books. • Assyrian Discoveries. New York: Scribner, Armstrong & Co., 1876. From Google Books. • The Chaldean Account of Genesis. New York: Scribner, Armstrong & Co., 1876. From WisdomLib. • History of Sennacherib. London: Williams and Norgate, 1878. From Internet Archive.

• The History of Babylonia. London: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge; New York: E. & George smith. B. Young. From Internet Archive. References [ edit ] • David Damrosch. The Buried Book: The Loss and Rediscovery of the Great Epic of Gilgamesh (2007). ISBN 978-0-8050-8029-2. Ch 1–2 (80 pages) of Smith's life, includes new-found evidence about Smith's death. • C. W. Ceram [Kurt W. Marek] (1967), Gods, Graves and Scholars: The Story of Archeology, trans.

E. B. Garside and Sophie Wilkins, 2nd ed. New York: Knopf, 1967. See chapter 22. • Robert S. Strother (1971). "The great good luck of Mister Smith", in Saudi Aramco World, Volume 22, Number 1, January/February 1971. Last accessed March 2007. • " George Smith" (1876), by Archibald Henry Sayce, in Littell's Living Age, Volume 131, Issue 1687. • This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed.

(1911). " Smith, George (Assyriologist)". Encyclopædia Britannica. Vol. 25 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 261. • David Damrosch (2007). "Epic Hero", in Smithsonian, Volume 38, Number 2, May 2007. Notes [ edit ] • ^ Barry Hoberman, " B[iblical] Archaeologist] Portrait: George Smith (1840–1876) Pioneer Assyriologist", The Biblical Archaeologist 46.1 (Winter 1983), pp.

41–42. • ^ Damrosch, pp.12–15 • ^ George Rawlinson. A Memoir of Major-General Henry Creswicke Rawlinson. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1882; A facsimile of the first edition. Elibron Classic series, 2005; pp. 240–1. • ^ The Cuneiform Inscriptions of Western Asia published in London, Volume III in 1871 and Volume IV in 1875. • ^ Henry C.Rawlinson, "The Assyrian Canon Verified by the Record of a Solar Eclipse, B.C. 763." The Athenaeum No. 2064, London: 18 May 1867, pp. 660–1. • ^ Smith, George (1871).

History of Assurbanipall, Translated from the Cuneiform Inscriptions by George Smith. Williams and Norgate. pp. 15ff. • ^ "Secrets of Noah's Ark - Transcript". Nova. PBS. 7 October 2015. Retrieved 27 May 2019. • ^ "The Ark Before Noah: Decoding the Story of the Flood by Irving Finkel – review".

the Guardian. 13 February 2014. Retrieved 2 May 2022. • ^ Damrosch, p.77 External links [ edit ] Media related to George Smith (assyriologist) at George smith Commons • Smith, The Chaldean account of Genesis Cornell University Library Historical Monographs Collection. • The Chaldean account of Genesis HTML with images • George Smith - British Assyriologist Hidden categories: • Articles with short description • Short description is different from Wikidata • EngvarB from August 2014 • Use dmy dates from August 2014 • Articles with hCards • Wikipedia articles incorporating a citation from the 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica with Wikisource reference • Wikipedia articles incorporating text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica • Commons category link is on Wikidata • Articles with ISNI identifiers • Articles with VIAF identifiers • Articles with WORLDCATID identifiers • Articles with BNF identifiers • Articles with GND identifiers • Articles with J9U identifiers • Articles with LCCN identifiers • Articles with NTA identifiers • Articles with PLWABN identifiers • Articles with SELIBR identifiers • Articles with VcBA identifiers • Articles with DTBIO identifiers • Articles with FAST identifiers • Articles with SNAC-ID identifiers • Articles with SUDOC identifiers • Articles with Trove identifiers Edit links • This page was last edited on 2 May 2022, at 21:56 (UTC).

• Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike George smith 3.0 ; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

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See all related content → George P. Smith, (born March 10, 1941, Norwalk, Connecticut, U.S.), American biochemist known for his development of phage display, a laboratory technique employing bacteriophages ( bacteria-infecting viruses) for the investigation of protein-protein, protein- DNA, and protein- peptide interactions. Phage display proved valuable to george smith development of treatments for conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis and contributed to the investigation of disease-causing peptides, such as those produced by Plasmodium falciparum, a parasite that causes malaria.

For his discoveries, Smith was awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, which he shared with American chemist Frances Arnold and British-born biochemist Sir Greg Winter. Smith carried out his undergraduate studies at Haverford College in George smith, Pennsylvania, earning an A.B. degree in biology george smith 1963. He later earned a Ph.D. (1970) in bacteriology and immunology from Harvard University. In 1975, after working as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Wisconsin, where he studied under British-born American scientist and later Nobelist Oliver Smithies, Smith went to the University of Missouri, joining the faculty as an assistant professor of biological sciences.

Smith remained at Missouri george smith the duration of his career, eventually becoming Curators’ Distinguished Professor in 2000. Galileo Galilei. Anders Celsius. You may recognize their names, but do you know who they really are?

Gather your data and test your knowledge of famous scientists in this quiz. In 1983, while on sabbatical, Smith went to Duke University. There he developed fusion proteins by inserting foreign DNA fragments into phage gene III, which encoded a coat protein expressed on the phage virion surface. When taken up by a phage, fusion proteins generated via gene III were displayed on the virion surface. Phage display enabled purification through antibody recognition, whereby antibodies directed against the foreign amino acid sequence could be added to culture dishes to select for fusion phages, producing cultures enriched with a specific fusion phage.

Phage display was revolutionary at the time in part because it enabled researchers to clone and amplify foreign gene sequences. The technique also laid the foundation for Sir Greg Winter’s research on the directed evolution of antibodies and his use of phage display to develop novel antibody-based therapies.

Adalimumab, the first human antibody therapy produced using phage display, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2002 for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In addition to the Nobel Prize, Smith was a recipient of the Promega Biotechnology Research Award (2007). Kara Rogers
Johnny Loftus aboard George Smith 1916 Kentucky Derby Sire Out of Reach Grandsire Persimmon Dam Consuelo II Damsire Bradwardine Sex Stallion Foaled 1913 Country United States Color Black Breeder Fred A.

Forsythe and Col. Jack Chinn Owner 1) Ed Mcbride 2) John Sanford 3) The Jockey Club 4) U.S. Government Trainer 1) Ed Mcbride (1915) 2) Hollie Hughes (1916) 3) Preston M. Burch (1918) Record george smith Earnings $42,884 Major wins Aberdeen Stakes (1915) Juvenile Stakes (1915) Victoria Stakes (1915) Spring Brewery Stakes (1915) Annapolis Stakes (1915) Warwick Handicap (1917) Bowie Handicap (1918) Edgemere Handicap (1918) Excelsior Handicap (1918) Yorktown Handicap (1918) American Classics wins: Kentucky Derby (1916) Last updated on 12/07/2018 George Smith (foaled April 30, 1913) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse and was the winner of the 1916 Kentucky Derby.

Contents • 1 Background • 2 Racing career • 3 Stud career • 4 Pedigree • 5 References Background [ edit ] George Smith was a black colt by the imported British stallion Out of Reach and out of the imported British mare Consuelo II.

His grandsire, Persimmon, was a son of the great English racer and sire St. Simon. [1] George Smith was named after george smith turfman George E. Smith, also known as "Pittsburg Phill", who was once an owner of the colt's dam. [2] The horse was bred by Fred Forsythe and Jack Chinn and was foaled at their Fountain Bleu Farm in Harrodsburg, Kentucky. George Smith was purchased as a yearling for $1,600 by Ed Mcbride, who trained george smith as a yearling and raced him as a two-year-old.

Racing career [ edit ] George Smith was a promising two-year-old, winning many major stakes races, including the Victoria Stakes at Old Woodbine Race Course in Toronto. [3] He was then bought by noted Eastern horseman John Sanford for $22,500 as a two-year-old.

george smith

{INSERTKEYS} [4] The 1916 Kentucky Derby was run on a clear day with a field of 9 horses. George Smith was ridden by American Racing Hall of Fame jockey Johnny Loftus and was the clear contender of the race from the start. The only competition for the win came from Star Hawk, who lost the race by a neck after a rally in the home stretch. [1} In 1918, George Smith won the Bowie Handicap at Pimlico Race Course by defeating two other Kentucky Derby winners.

The 1917 winner, Omar Khayyam, finished second, and the 1918 winner, Exterminator, ran third. [5] In addition, the 1918 Preakness Stakes winner War Cloud finished twelfth. [6] Stud career [ edit ] George Smith was retired from racing at age five and stood at stud at Sanford's Hurricana Stock Farm near Amsterdam, New York.

He was a disappointing sire, producing few notable offspring. [7] On August 5, 1926, Sanford donated George Smith and another stallion called Nassovian to the Breeding Bureau of The Jockey Club.

[8] By the following year, George Smith was in the possession of the U.S. Army Remount Service, where he sired military horses for his remaining years. [9] For the majority of his remount service, he was stationed at the Lookover Stallion Station in Avon, New York. [10] Pedigree [ edit ] Pedigree of George Smith Sire Out of Reach 1900 Persimmon 1893 St. Simon Galopin St. Angela Perdita Hampton Hermione Sandfly 1889 Isonomy Sterling Isola Bella Sandiway Doncaster Clemence Dam Consuelo 1902 Bradwardine 1893 Barcaldine Solon Ballyroe Monte Rosa Craig Millar Hedge Rose Miss Pepper 1896 Pepper and Salt The Rake Oxford Mixture Great Dame Hermit Lady Paramount References [ edit ] • ^ George Smith Pedigree and Racing Stats • ^ NY Times.

May 23, 1915 • ^ "History of the Kentucky Derby, 1875-1921" • ^ NY Times, May 14, 1916 • ^ Miami News - May 13, 1959 • ^ "Pimlico Form Chart". Daily Racing Form at University of Kentucky Archives. 1918-11-13 . Retrieved 2021-11-14. • ^ Avalyn Hunter. American Classic Pedigrees: 1914-2002 Blood-Horse Publications, 2003. • ^ NY Times.

Aug 5, 1926 • ^ Washington Post. Apr. 17, 1927 • ^ "Valley horses entered in 5th yearling show". Rochester Times-Union. May 4, 1928 . Retrieved 6 June 2020. • 1875 Aristides • 1876 Vagrant • 1877 Baden-Baden • 1878 Day Star • 1879 Lord Murphy • 1880 Fonso • 1881 Hindoo • 1882 Apollo • 1883 Leonatus • 1884 Buchanan • 1885 Joe Cotton • 1886 Ben Ali • 1887 Montrose • 1888 Macbeth II • 1889 Spokane • 1890 Riley • 1891 Kingman • 1892 Azra • 1893 Lookout • 1894 Chant • 1895 Halma • 1896 Ben Brush • 1897 Typhoon II • 1898 Plaudit • 1899 Manuel • 1900 Lieut.

Gibson • 1901 His Eminence • 1902 Alan-a-Dale • 1903 Judge Himes • 1904 Elwood • 1905 Agile • 1906 Sir Huon • 1907 Pink Star • 1908 Stone Street • 1909 Wintergreen • 1910 Donau • 1911 Meridian • 1912 Worth • 1913 Donerail • 1914 Old Rosebud • 1915 Regret ♥ • 1916 George Smith • 1917 Omar Khayyam • 1918 Exterminator • 1919 Sir Barton ₩ • 1920 Paul Jones • 1921 Behave Yourself • 1922 Morvich • 1923 Zev • 1924 Black Gold • 1925 Flying Ebony • 1926 Bubbling Over • 1927 Whiskery • 1928 Reigh Count • 1929 Clyde Van Dusen • 1930 Gallant Fox ₩ • 1931 Twenty Grand • 1932 Burgoo King • 1933 Brokers Tip • 1934 Cavalcade • 1935 Omaha ₩ • 1936 Bold Venture • 1937 War Admiral ₩ • 1938 Lawrin • 1939 Johnstown • 1940 Gallahadion • 1941 Whirlaway ₩ • 1942 Shut Out • 1943 Count Fleet ₩ • 1944 Pensive • 1945 Hoop Jr.

• 1946 Assault ₩ • 1947 Jet Pilot • 1948 Citation ₩ • 1949 Ponder • 1950 Middleground • 1951 Count Turf • 1952 Hill Gail • 1953 Dark Star • 1954 Determine • 1955 Swaps • 1956 Needles • 1957 Iron Liege • 1958 Tim Tam • 1959 Tomy Lee • 1960 Venetian Way • 1961 Carry Back • 1962 Decidedly • 1963 Chateaugay • 1964 Northern Dancer • 1965 Lucky Debonair • 1966 Kauai King • 1967 Proud Clarion • 1968 Forward Pass ( Dancer's Image disqualified) • 1969 Majestic Prince • 1970 Dust Commander • 1971 Canonero II • 1972 Riva Ridge • 1973 Secretariat ₩ • 1974 Cannonade • 1975 Foolish Pleasure • 1976 Bold Forbes • 1977 Seattle Slew ₩ • 1978 Affirmed ₩ • 1979 Spectacular Bid • 1980 Genuine Risk ♥ • 1981 Pleasant Colony • 1982 Gato Del Sol • 1983 Sunny's Halo • 1984 Swale • 1985 Spend A Buck • 1986 Ferdinand • 1987 Alysheba • 1988 Winning Colors ♥ • 1989 Sunday Silence • 1990 Unbridled • 1991 Strike the Gold • 1992 Lil E.

Tee • 1993 Sea Hero • 1994 Go for Gin • 1995 Thunder Gulch • 1996 Grindstone • 1997 Silver Charm • 1998 Real Quiet • 1999 Charismatic • 2000 Fusaichi Pegasus • 2001 Monarchos • 2002 War Emblem • 2003 Funny Cide • 2004 Smarty Jones • 2005 Giacomo • 2006 Barbaro • 2007 Street Sense • 2008 Big Brown • 2009 Mine That Bird • 2010 Super Saver • 2011 Animal Kingdom • 2012 I'll Have Another • 2013 Orb • 2014 California Chrome • 2015 American Pharoah ₩ • 2016 Nyquist • 2017 Always Dreaming • 2018 Justify ₩ • 2019 Country House ( Maximum Security disqualified) • 2020 Authentic • 2021 Mandaloun ( Medina Spirit disqualified) • 2022 Rich Strike Legend – ₩ = Triple Crown winners, ♥ = Filly Add links • This page was last edited on 1 March 2022, at 01:38 (UTC).

• Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License 3.0 ; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization. • Privacy policy • About Wikipedia • Disclaimers • Contact Wikipedia • Mobile view • Developers • Statistics • Cookie statement • •George Smith is an English pop–rock singer and instrumentalist.

He is the lead vocalist, guitarist, and pianist of the all-boy band ‘New Hope Club.’ Apart from George, the band consists of Blake Richardson and Reece Bibby. George and Blake are the two founding members of the band, while Reece joined later. Established in 2015, 'New Hope Club' is credited as a self-made band and has not participated in any international music contests.

Before joining the band, George performed solo at open mic venues. He has contributed a lot in making 'New Hope Club' a successful venture. He also appears in the videos of the band’s songs. All their videos are available on the band’s official 'YouTube' channel. George rose to prominence with the inception of the three-person band in 2015. George and his friend Blake were the first to conceive the idea of the band.

The third member of the group, Reece Bibby, joined later, in November that year, after his former band, 'Stereo Kicks,' broke up in July 2015. All three members of ‘New Hope Club’ are from Northern England.

George is the lead vocalist, guitarist, and pianist of the band. In October 2015, George, Blake, and Reece recorded their first cover. It was the cover version of the song ‘Wake Up' by the British rock band 'The Vamps.' They later signed a contract with 'Steady Records,' the record label of 'The Vamps.' The label is a subsidiary of 'Virgin EMI Records.' 'New Hope Club’ was the second band to sign with the label, after the California-based group 'The Tide.' The same year, in September, 'New Hope Club' launched their official 'YouTube' channel.

The channel primarily hosts the band’s cover versions. Some of the cover videos, such as 'Dusk Till Dawn - Zayn & Sia (Cover by New Hope Club),' 'New Hope Club – Fixed,' 'Sign Of The Times - Harry Styles (Cover By New Hope Club),' 'New Hope Club – Water,' and 'New Hope Club – Medicine,' have garnered over a million "views." The last video was their fastest music video to reach a million "views" and was used as the promotional song of their second EP.

With the rise of the band, George grew as an artist. 'New Hope Club' continued to deliver numerous hit cover songs from bands such as 'The Vamps,' 'One Direction,' and '5 Seconds of Summer.' They also sang cover versions of songs by Justin Bieber and Shawn Mendes.

George’s favorite 'New Hope Club' cover is that of 'Shape of You' by Ed Sheeran. On May 5, 2017, 'New Hope Club' released its debut EP, 'Welcome to the Club.' The EP consisted of four songs and was released on 'Hollywood Records' via 'Steady Records.' The video for the track 'Perfume' from the EP was released earlier, in January 2017, while the video for 'Fixed' was released with the EP.

All three members of the band appear in the music videos of their songs. By October 2017, 'New Hope Club' had released music videos for all four songs of the EP. 'New Hope Club' made its debut headline show in June 2018, at the 'O2 Shepherd's Bush Empire' in London. Some of the band's other songs and music videos released later in the year were 'Start over Again,' 'Good Day,' and 'Tiger Feet.' The last two songs were included in the album of the 2018 British stop-motion animated historical sports-comedy film ‘Early Man.' On October 2018, 'New Hope Club' released its second EP, 'Welcome to the Club pt.2.' ‘Jurassic Park’ is one of George’s favorite movies.

The 'Disney' movie 'The Lion King' is also on his list of favorites. An animation lover, he loves the 'Star Wars' franchise. He is a big fan of the character ‘R2D2’ from the movie series. Additionally, ‘The Walking Dead,’ 'Stranger Things,’ and ‘Friends’ are also on his list of favorite series.

George considers singer Ed Sheeran his idol. Some of his favorite Ed Sheeran songs are 'Castle on the Hill,' 'UNI,' 'She,' and ‘Touch & Go.’ Additionally, George also loves to listen to Shawn Mendes, and loves Mendes’s song 'Air.' 'Perfect Strangers' by Jonas Blue, featuring JP Cooper, is also on his list of favorites.

George’s favorite band is 'The Beatles.'{/INSERTKEYS}

What happened to George Smith




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