Sprain

sprain

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The location and intensity of your pain can help determine the extent and nature of the damage. X-rays can help rule out a fracture or other bone injury as the source of the problem. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sprain may be used to help diagnose the extent of the injury. • MRI • X-ray Treatment For immediate self-care of a sprain, try the R.I.C.E. approach — rest, ice, compression, elevation: • Rest.

Sprain activities that cause pain, swelling or discomfort. But don't avoid all physical activity. • Ice. Even if you're seeking medical help, ice the area immediately. Use an ice pack or slush bath of ice and water for 15 to 20 minutes each time and repeat every two to three hours while you're awake for the first few days after the injury.

• Compression. To help stop swelling, compress the area with an elastic bandage until the swelling stops. Don't wrap it too tightly or you may hinder circulation. Begin wrapping at the end farthest from your heart. Loosen the wrap if the pain increases, the area becomes numb or swelling is occurring below the wrapped area. • Elevation. Elevate the injured area above the level of your heart, especially at night, which allows gravity to help reduce swelling.

Over-the-counter pain medications such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) also can be helpful. After the first two days, gently begin to sprain the injured area. You should see sprain gradual, progressive improvement in the joint's ability to support your weight or your ability to move without pain.

Recovery from sprain can take days to months. A physical therapist can help you to maximize stability and strength of the injured joint or limb. Your doctor may suggest that you immobilize the area with a brace or splint. For some injuries, such as a torn ligament, surgery may be considered. Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic Clinical trials Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this condition.

Preparing for your appointment While you may initially consult your family physician, he or sprain may refer you to a doctor who specializes in sports medicine or orthopedic surgery. What you can do You may want to write a list that includes: • Detailed descriptions of your symptoms • Information about medical sprain you've had • Information about the medical sprain of your parents or siblings • All the medications and dietary supplements you take • Questions you want to ask the doctor What to expect from your doctor Your doctor may ask some of the following questions: • How exactly were you moving when the injury occurred?

• Did you hear or feel a pop or snap? • When did it happen? • What types of home treatments have you tried? • Have you ever injured this part of your body before? • If so, how did that injury occur? • Sprains and strains. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/sprains-and-strains/advanced. Accessed April 27, 2018. • Walls RM, et al., eds.

General principles of orthopedic injuries. In: Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2018. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 27, 2018. • Safran MR, et al. Sprain. In: Instructions for Sports Medicine Patients. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Saunders; 2012. https://www.clinicalkey.com.

Accessed April 27, 2018. • Sprains, strains and other soft-tissue injuries. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases--conditions/sprains-strains-and-other-soft-tissue-injuries. Accessed April 27, 2018. • AskMayoExpert. Ankle sprain. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2018. • Maughan KL. Ankle sprain. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed April 30, 2018. Mayo Clinic Press Sprain out these best-sellers and special offers on books and newsletters from Mayo Clinic Press.

• NEW – The Essential Diabetes Book - Mayo Clinic Press NEW – The Essential Diabetes Book • Cook Smart, Eat Well – 2 FREE recipes - Mayo Clinic Press Cook Smart, Eat Well – 2 FREE recipes • NEW – Mayo Clinic on Hearing and Balance - Mayo Clinic Press NEW – Mayo Clinic on Hearing and Balance • FREE Mayo Clinic Diet Assessment - Mayo Clinic Press FREE Mayo Clinic Diet Assessment • Mayo Clinic Health Letter - FREE book - Mayo Clinic Press Mayo Clinic Health Letter - FREE book • Care at Mayo Clinic • Appointments • Locations • Patient & Visitor Guide • International Services • Medical Departments & Centers • Doctors & Medical Staff • Patient Online Services • Billing & Insurance • Clinical Trials • International Business Collaborations • About Mayo Clinic • Contact Us • Health Information Overview A sprain is a stretching or tearing of ligaments sprain the tough bands of fibrous tissue that connect two bones together in your joints.

The most common location for a sprain is in your ankle. Initial treatment includes rest, ice, compression and elevation. Mild sprains can be successfully treated at home. Severe sprains sometimes require surgery to repair torn ligaments. Most ankle sprains involve injuries to the three ligaments on the outside of your ankle. Ligaments are tough bands of tissue that stabilize joints and help prevent excessive movement. An ankle sprain occurs when you roll, twist or turn your ankle in an awkward way.

This can stretch or tear the ligaments that help hold your ankle bones together. Sprained ankle A sprained ankle is the stretching or tearing of ankle ligaments, which support the joint by connecting bones to each other. Signs and symptoms will vary, depending on the severity of the injury, and may sprain • Pain • Swelling • Bruising • Limited ability to move the affected joint • Hearing or feeling a "pop" in your joint at the time of injury When to see the doctor Mild sprains can be treated at home.

But the injuries that cause sprains can also cause sprain injuries, such as fractures. You should see a doctor if you: • Can't move or bear weight on the affected joint • Have pain directly over the bones of an injured joint • Have numbness in any part of the injured sprain Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic Causes A sprain occurs when you overextend or tear a ligament while severely stressing a joint.

Sprains often occur in the following circumstances: • Ankle — Walking or exercising on an uneven surface, landing awkwardly from a jump • Knee — Pivoting during an athletic activity • Wrist — Landing on an outstretched hand during a fall • Thumb — Skiing injury or overextension when playing racquet sports, such as tennis Children have areas of softer tissue, called growth plates, near the ends of their bones.

The ligaments around a joint are often stronger than these growth plates, sprain children are more likely to experience a fracture than a sprain.

Sprain factors Factors contributing to sprains include: • Environmental conditions. Slippery or uneven surfaces can make you more prone to injury. • Fatigue. Tired muscles are less likely to provide good support for your joints.

When you're tired, you're also more likely to succumb to forces that could stress a joint. • Poor equipment. Ill-fitting or poorly maintained footwear or other sporting equipment can contribute to your risk of a sprain. Prevention Regular stretching and strengthening exercises for your sport, fitness or work activity, as part of an overall physical conditioning program, can help to minimize sprain risk of sprain.

Try to be in shape to play your sport; don't play your sport to get in shape. If you have a physically demanding occupation, regular conditioning can help prevent injuries. You can protect your joints in the long term by working to strengthen and condition the muscles around the joint that has been injured. The best brace you can give yourself is your own "muscle brace." Ask your doctor about appropriate conditioning and stability exercises.

Also, use footwear that offers support and protection. • Sprains and strains. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/sprains-and-strains/advanced. Accessed April 27, 2018. • Walls RM, et al., eds. General principles of orthopedic injuries.

In: Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2018. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 27, 2018. • Sprain MR, et al. Sprain. In: Instructions for Sports Medicine Patients. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Saunders; 2012. sprain. Accessed April 27, 2018. • Sprains, strains and other soft-tissue injuries.

American Sprain of Orthopaedic Surgeons. https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases--conditions/sprains-strains-and-other-soft-tissue-injuries. Accessed April 27, 2018. • AskMayoExpert. Ankle sprain. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation sprain Medical Education and Research; 2018. • Maughan KL. Ankle sprain. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed April 30, 2018.

Mayo Clinic Press Check out these best-sellers and special offers on books and newsletters from Mayo Clinic Press. • NEW – The Essential Diabetes Book - Mayo Clinic Press NEW – The Essential Diabetes Book • Cook Smart, Eat Well – 2 FREE recipes - Mayo Clinic Press Cook Smart, Eat Well – 2 FREE recipes • NEW – Mayo Clinic on Hearing and Balance - Mayo Clinic Press NEW – Mayo Clinic on Hearing and Balance • FREE Mayo Clinic Diet Assessment - Mayo Clinic Press FREE Mayo Clinic Diet Assessment • Mayo Clinic Health Letter - Sprain book - Mayo Clinic Press Mayo Clinic Health Letter - FREE book
Medical condition Sprain Other names Torn ligament, distorsio A sprained ankle with bruising and swelling Specialty Sports medicine, physical medicine & rehabilitation, orthopedics, family medicine, emergency medicine Symptoms Pain, swelling, bruising, joint instability, limited range of sprain of the injured joint Duration Mild cases - few days to six weeks Severe cases - few weeks to sprain Causes Trauma, sports injuries, overuse, environmental hazards Risk factors Environmental factors, age, poor training or sports gear Diagnostic method Physical exam, joint x-ray Differential diagnosis Strain, fracture Prevention Frequent stretching and conditioning, bracing at risk joints during exercise Treatment Rest, ice, compression, sprain, NSAIDs Medication Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) Prognosis Mild injuries resolve well on their sprain.

Severe injuries likely require surgery and physical therapy. Not to be confused with Joint dislocation. A sprain, also known as a torn ligament, is an injury resulting in the stretching sprain tearing of ligaments within a joint, often caused by a sudden movement abruptly forcing the joint beyond its functional range of motion. Ligaments are tough, inelastic fibers made of collagen that connect two or more bones to form a joint and are important for joint stability and proprioception, which is the body's sense of limb position and movement.

[1] Sprains can occur at any joint but most commonly occur in the ankle, knee, or wrist. [2] An equivalent injury to a muscle or tendon is known as a strain.

The majority of sprains are mild, causing minor swelling and bruising that can be resolved with conservative treatment, typically summarized as RICE: rest, ice, compression, elevation. However, severe sprains involve complete tears, ruptures, or fractures, often leading to joint instability, severe pain, and decreased functional ability.

These sprains require surgical fixation, prolonged immobilization, and physical therapy. [3] Contents • 1 Signs and symptoms • 2 Causes • 2.1 Mechanism • 2.2 Risk factors • 3 Diagnosis • 3.1 Classification • 3.2 Joints involved • 4 Treatment sprain 4.1 Conservative measures • 4.2 Functional rehabilitation • 5 References • 6 External links Signs and symptoms [ edit ] • Pain • Sprain • Bruising or hematoma caused by broken blood vessels within the injured ligament • Joint instability [4] • Difficulty with bearing weight • Decreased functional ability or range of motion of the injured joint [5] • Ligament rupture may cause a cracking or popping sound at the time of injury [6] Knowing the signs and symptoms of a sprain can be helpful in differentiating the injury from a strain or fracture.

Strains typically present with pain, cramping, muscle spasm, and muscle weakness, and fractures typically present with bone tenderness, especially when bearing weight. [7] Causes [ edit ] Acute sprains typically occur when the joint is abruptly forced beyond its functional range of motion, often in the setting of trauma or sports injuries.

Chronic sprains are caused by repetitive movements leading to overuse. [ sprain needed] Mechanism [ edit ] Ligaments are collagen fibers that connect bones together, providing passive stabilization to a joint.

These fibers can be found in various organizational patterns (parallel, oblique, spiral, etc.) depending on the function of the joint involved. Ligaments can be extra-capsular (located outside the joint capsule), capsular (continuation of the joint capsule), or intra-articular (located within a joint capsule). [1] The location has important implications for healing as blood flow to intra-articular ligaments is diminished compared to extra-capsular or sprain ligaments.

sprain

{INSERTKEYS} [8] Collagen fibers have about a 4% elastic zone where fibers stretch out with increased load on the joint. However, exceeding this elastic limit causes a rupture of fibers, leading to a sprain. It is important to recognize that ligaments adapt to training by increasing the cross-sectional area of fibers.

[9] When a ligament is immobilized, the ligament has been shown to rapidly weaken. Normal daily activity is important for maintaining about 80–90% of the mechanical properties of a ligament.

[1] Risk factors [ edit ] • Fatigue and overuse [1] • High-intensity contact sports • Environmental factors • Poor conditioning or equipment [6] • Age and genetic predisposition to ligament injuries [10] • Lack of stretching or " warming up", which when performed properly increases blood flow and joint flexibility [11] Wrist sprain from a fall while ice skating Diagnosis [ edit ] Sprains can often be diagnosed clinically based on the patient's signs and symptoms, mechanism of injury, and physical examination.

However, x-rays can be obtained to help identify fractures, especially in cases of tenderness or bone pain at the injured site. [12] In some instances, particularly if the healing process is prolonged or a more serious injury is suspected, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed to look at the surrounding soft tissue and ligaments. [13] Classification [ edit ] • First degree sprain (mild) – There is minor stretching and structural damage to the ligament, leading to mild swelling and bruising.

Patients typically present without joint instability or decreased range of motion of the joint. [ citation needed] • Second degree sprain (moderate) – There is a partial tear of the affected ligament. Patients typically experience moderate swelling, tenderness, and some instability of the joint.

There may be some difficulty bearing weight on the affected joint. {/INSERTKEYS}

sprain

{INSERTKEYS} [14] • Third degree sprain (severe) – There is a complete rupture or tear of the ligament, sometimes avulsing a piece of bone. Patients typically experience severe joint instability, pain, bruising, swelling, and inability to apply weight to the joint. [15] Three-dimensional animation illustrating a sprain Joints involved [ edit ] Although any joint can experience a sprain, some of the more common injuries include the following: [3] • Ankle - Sprains most commonly occur at the ankle and can take longer to heal than ankle bone fractures.

Most sprained ankles usually occur in the lateral ligaments on the outside of the ankle. Common causes include walking on uneven surfaces or during contact sports. [16] See sprained ankle or high ankle sprain for more details. • Inversion Ankle Sprain - injury that occurs when ankle rolls inward • Eversion Ankle Sprain - injury that occurs when ankle rolls outward • Toes • Turf toe (metatarsophalangeal joint sprain) - forced hyperextension of the big toe upwards, especially during sports (initiating a sprint on a hard surface) [17] • Knee - Sprains commonly occur at the knee, especially following intense pivoting on a planted leg during contact sports ( American football, football, basketball, pole vaulting, softball, baseball and some styles of martial arts).

[18] • Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury • Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury • Medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury • Lateral collateral ligament (LCL) injury • Superior Tibiofibular Joint Sprain - typically caused by a twisting injury to the joint connecting the tibia (shinbone) and fibula • Patellar dislocation • Fingers and wrists - Wrist sprains commonly occur, especially during a fall on an outstretched hand.

• Gamekeeper's thumb ( Skier's thumb) - forceful grabbing that leads to an injury to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint of the thumb, historically found in Scottish gamekeepers [19] • Spine • Neck sprain at the cervical vertebrae • Whiplash (Traumatic Cervical Spine Syndrome) - forced hyperextension and flexion of the neck, classically found in rear-end auto accidents [20] • Back sprain - Back sprains are one of the most common medical complaints, often caused by poor lifting mechanics and weak core muscles.

Treatment [ edit ] Treatment of sprains usually involves incorporating conservative measures to reduce the signs and symptoms of sprains, surgery to repair severe tears or ruptures, and rehabilitation to restore function to the injured joint.

Although most sprains can be managed without surgery, severe injuries may require tendon grafting or ligament repair based on the individual's circumstances. [21] The amount of rehabilitation and time needed for recovery will depend on the severity of the sprain. [22] Conservative measures [ edit ] Depending on the mechanism of injury, joint involvement, and severity, most sprains can be treated using conservative measures following the acronym RICE within the first 24 hours of sustaining an injury.

[23] However, it is important to recognize that treatments should be individualized depending on the patient's particular injury and symptoms. [24] Over-the-counter medications such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help relieve pain, and topical NSAIDs can be as effective as medications taken by mouth.

[25] • Protect: The injured site should be protected and immobilized, as there is an increased risk of recurrent injury to the affected ligaments. [26] • Rest: The joint affected should be immobilized and bearing weight should be minimized.

For example, walking should be limited in cases of sprained ankles. [27] • Ice: Ice should be applied immediately to the sprain to reduce swelling and pain. [28] Ice can be applied 3–4 times a day for 10–15 minutes at a time or until the swelling subsides and can be combined with a wrapping for support. [27] Ice can also be used to numb pain but should only be applied for a short period of time (less than twenty minutes) for this purpose.

[29] Prolonged ice exposure can reduce blood flow to the injured area and slow the healing process. [30] • Compression: Dressings, bandages, or wraps should be used to immobilize the sprain and provide support. When wrapping the injury, more pressure should be applied to the distal end of the injury and decrease in the direction of the heart.

This helps circulate the blood from the extremities to the heart. Careful management of swelling through cold compression therapy is critical to the healing process by preventing further pooling of fluid in the sprained area.

However, compression should not impede circulation of the limb. [27] • Elevation: Keeping the sprained joint elevated (in relation to the rest of the body) can minimize swelling. [27] Other non-operative therapies including the continuous passive motion machine (moves joint without patient exertion) and cryocuff (type of cold compress that is activated similarly to a blood pressure cuff) have been effective in reducing swelling and improving range of motion.

[31] Recent studies has shown that traction is just as effective as the RICE technique in treating ankle sprains in pediatric patients. [32] Functional rehabilitation [ edit ] The components of an effective rehabilitation program for all sprain injuries include increasing the range of motion of the affected joint and progressive muscle strengthening exercises. [33] After implementing conservative measures to reduce swelling and pain, mobilizing the limb within 48–72 hours following injury has been shown to promote healing by stimulating growth factors in musculoskeletal tissues linked to cellular division and matrix remodeling.

[22] Prolonged immobilization can delay the healing of a sprain, as it usually leads to muscle atrophy and weakness. [34] Although prolonged immobilization can have a negative effect on recovery, a study in 1996 suggest that the use of bracing can improve healing by alleviating pain and stabilizing the injury to prevent further damage to the ligament or re-injury.

[35] When using a brace, it is necessary to ensure adequate blood flow to the extremity. [36] Ultimately, the goal of functional rehabilitation is to return the patient to full daily activities while minimizing the risk of re-injury. References [ edit ] • ^ a b c d Bahr, Roald; Alfredson, Håkan; Järvinen, Markku; Järvinen, Tero; Khan, Karim; Kjaer, Michael; Matheson, Gordon; Maehlum, Sverre (2012-06-22), Bahr, Roald (ed.), "Types and Causes of Injuries", The IOC Manual of Sports Injuries, Wiley-Blackwell, pp.

1–24, doi: 10.1002/9781118467947.ch1, ISBN 978-1-118-46794-7 • ^ Hartshorne, Henry. "Sprained Joints". The Home Cyclopedia Of Health And Medicine . Retrieved 16 February 2010. • ^ a b "Ligament Sprain". Physiopedia . Retrieved 2020-04-13. • ^ Nancy Garrick, Deputy Director (2017-04-10). "Sprains and Strains". National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases .

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37 (4): 413–429. ISSN 1062-6050. PMC 164373. PMID 12937563. • ^ familydoctor.org editorial staff (2010-12-01) [Created:1996-01-01]. "Ankle Sprains: Healing and Preventing Injury". American Academy sprain Family Physicians. • ^ Hsu H, Siwiec RM (2019), "Forearm Splinting", StatPearls, StatPearls Publishing, PMID 29763155retrieved 2019-03-12 External links [ edit ] • Questions and Answers about Sprains and Strains - US National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Hidden sprain • Articles with short description • Short description sprain Wikidata • Short description is different from Wikidata • All articles sprain unsourced statements • Articles with unsourced statements from October 2020 • Commons category link is on Wikidata • Articles with NDL identifiers • العربية • Català • Čeština • Deutsch • Ελληνικά • Español • Euskara • فارسی • Français • Gaeilge • Galego • 한국어 • Հայերեն • हिन्दी • Bahasa Indonesia • Íslenska • Italiano • עברית • ಕನ್ನಡ • മലയാളം • Nederlands • 日本語 • Sprain bokmål • Polski • Português • Română • Русский • සිංහල • Simple English • Soomaaliga • Српски / srpski • Srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски • Sunda • Suomi • Svenska • Татарча/tatarça • తెలుగు • Tiếng Việt • 中文 Edit links • This page sprain last edited on 29 April 2022, at 06:25 (UTC).

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Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. sprain Past sprain sprained Gerund: spraining Imperative sprain sprain Present I sprain you sprain he/she/it sprains we sprain you sprain they sprain Preterite I sprained you sprained he/she/it sprained we sprained you sprained they sprained Present Continuous I am spraining you are spraining he/she/it is spraining we are spraining you are spraining they are spraining Present Perfect I have sprained you have sprained he/she/it has sprained we have sprained you have sprained they have sprained Past Continuous I was spraining you were spraining he/she/it was spraining we were spraining you were spraining they were spraining Past Perfect I had sprained you had sprained he/she/it had sprained we had sprained you had sprained they had sprained Future I will sprain you will sprain he/she/it will sprain we will sprain you will sprain they will sprain Future Perfect I will have sprained you will have sprained he/she/it will have sprained we will have sprained you will have sprained they will have sprained Sprain Continuous I will be spraining you will be spraining he/she/it will be spraining we will be spraining you will be spraining they will be spraining Present Perfect Continuous I have been spraining you have been spraining he/she/it has been spraining we have been spraining you have been spraining they have been spraining Future Perfect Continuous I will have been spraining you will sprain been spraining he/she/it will have been spraining we will have been spraining you will have been spraining they will have been spraining Past Perfect Continuous I had been spraining you had been spraining he/she/it had been spraining we had been spraining you had been spraining they had been spraining Conditional I would sprain you would sprain he/she/it would sprain we would sprain you would sprain they would sprain Past Conditional I would have sprained you would have sprained he/she/it would have sprained we would have sprained you would have sprained they would have sprained wrench, pull, twist - a sharp strain on muscles or ligaments; "the wrench to his knee occurred as he fell"; "he was sprain with a hamstring pull" Verb 1.

sprain - twist suddenly so as to sprain; sprain one's ankle"; "The wrestler twisted his shoulder"; "the hikers sprained their ankles when they fell"; "I turned my ankle and couldn't walk for several days" to twist (a joint, especially the ankle or wrist) in such a way as to tear or stretch the ligaments.

She sprained her ankle yesterday. verstuit يَلْتَوي المفصَل او الكاحِل، يَمْلَغ изкълчвам torcer vyvrtnout verstauchen forstuve εξαρθρώνω, στραμπουλίζω nikastama پيچ خوردن nyrjäyttää fouler, se donner une entorse à לִנקוֹעַ में मोच आना uganuti (zglob) sprain, megrándít terkilir sprain distorcere, slogare くじく 삐다 išsisukti izmežģīt terseliuh verstuiken forstue; forstrekke skręcać torcer a luxa, a face o entorsă растянуть связки vyvrtnúť si, vytknúť si izviniti uganuti vricka, stuka ทำให้เคล็ด burkmak 扭傷 розтягти зв'язки موچ آنا làm bong gân 扭伤 noun a twisting of a joint in this way.

verstuiting مَلْغ، إلتِواء изкълчване torção vyvrtnutí, výron die Verstauchung forstuvning στραμπούληγμα nikastus پيچ خوردگي nyrjähdys foulure, entorse נקע मोच uganuće ficam, rándulás pilinan tognun distorsione, slogatura ねんざ 삠 išsisukimas izmežģījums pilinan verstuiking forstuing; forstrekking skręcenie entorse luxare, entorsă растяжение связок, сустава vytknutie, vyvrtnutie izvin uganuće vrickning, stukning อาการเคล็ด burkulma 扭傷 розтягнення зв'язок موچ sự bong gân 扭伤 Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

sprain → إِلتِواءُ الـمِفْصَليَلْوِي الـمِفْصَل vymknoutvymknutí forstrækkeforstrækning verstauchenVerstauchung διάστρεμμαστραμπουλίζω esguincehacerse un esguincetorcerse nyrjähdysnyrjäyttää foulurese fouler uganućeuganuti slogareslogatura くじく捻挫 삐다접질림 verstuikenverstuiking forstueforstuing zwichnąćzwichnięcie distensãotorcer растяжение связокрастянуть связки stukastukning ทำให้เคล็ดอาการเคล็ด burkmakburkulma làm bong gânsự bong gân 扭伤 • ▲ • spouseless • Spousess • spout • spouter • Spoutfish • spouting • spoutless • Spoutshell • spouty • spoylefull sprain spp.

• SPQR • SPR • sprachgefühl • sprack • sprackle • Sprad • Spradde • spraddle • spraddled • sprag • Sprague Frank Julian • Spraguea • Spraguea umbellatum • spraid • sprain • Sprain fracture • sprained • spraint • Spraints • sprang • sprangle • sprat • Sprat borer • Sprat loon sprain Sprat mew • Spratly Islands • sprattle • sprauncy • sprawl • sprain • sprawler sprain sprawling • sprawls • sprawly • spray • spray can • Spray condenser • spray dome • Spray drain • spray gun • ▼ • ▲ • sprain brake • Sprag clutch • Sprag clutch • Sprag clutch • sprag road • spragger • Spraglebugten • sprags • sprags • sprags • Sprague Dawley rat • Sprague Dawley rat • Sprague Dawley rat • Sprague Dawley rat • Sprague Frank Julian • Sprague Memorial Hall • Sprague's Pipit • Sprague, Clifton • Sprague, Frank sprain Sprague, Frank Julian • Sprague-Dawley • Sprague-Dawley rat • Sprague-Dawley rat • Sprague-Dawley rat • Sprague-Dawley rat • Spraguea • Spraguea • Spraguea umbellatum • Spraguea sprain • spraid • sprain • sprain (one's) ankle • sprain ankle • sprain fracture • sprain fracture • sprain fracture sprain sprain her ankle • sprain his ankle • sprain sprain ankle • sprain of ankle • sprain of ankle • sprain of ankle • sprain of back • sprain of back • sprain of back • sprain of foot • sprain of foot • sprain of foot • sprain one's ankle • sprain our ankle • sprain their ankle • sprain your ankle sprain sprained • sprained • sprained • sprained • Sprained ankle • Sprained ankle • sprain her ankle • sprained his ankle • sprained my ankle • ▼ • • Terms of Use • Privacy policy • Feedback • Advertise with Us Copyright © 2003-2022 Farlex, Inc Disclaimer All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and sprain reference data is for informational purposes only.

This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of sprain legal, medical, or any other professional.
Sprains are injuries where a ligament is stretched or torn within a joint. Common places you might have a sprain can include your ankle, knee and wrist.

In severe sprains, the ligaments can be partially or completely torn – sometimes leading to surgery. Treatment for sprains often involves rest and physical therapy. • Overview • Symptoms and Causes • Diagnosis and Tests • Management and Treatment • Prevention • Outlook / Prognosis • Living With Sprains of the Ankle, Knee and Wrist sprain Overview • Symptoms and Causes • Diagnosis and Tests • Management and Treatment • Prevention • Outlook / Prognosis • Living With • Back To Top Overview What is a sprain?

A sprain happens when a ligament is stretched or torn. A ligament is a strong, fibrous band of rope-like tissue that connects two or more bones at a joint.

When you have a sprain, you may have injured one or more ligaments. A sprain is different from a strain, even though sometimes the terms can get used interchangeably. Sprain strain is a stretch, pull or tear of where a muscle attaches to a bone. Think of sprain as a strain is muscle to bone and a sprain is bone to bone.

When you sprain a sprain, it directly impacts the joint involved. The severity of a sprain can range from the ligament being stretched, partially torn or completely torn.

How bad the injury is depends on both the degree of sprain and how many ligaments are involved. Where do sprains occur? You can have a sprain in any joint in the body but the most vulnerable spots include those at higher risk of injury from falls and trauma within both the upper and lower parts of the body. The three most common spots for sprains are the ankle, knee and wrist.

• Ankle sprain: This type of sprain typically happens when the foot turns inward as you run, turn or land on the ankle after sprain jump.

• Knee sprain: Typically, this occurs after a blow to the knee or a fall. Sudden twisting of the knee may result in a sprain. • Wrist sprain: This sprain often happens when you fall and land on an outstretched hand.

Who is at risk for sprains? Anyone can be at risk for a sprain. A sprain can happen to both the young and old, as well as the athletic and those doing typical daily activities. You may be at an increased risk if: • You have a history of sprains • You are in poor physical condition or are overweight. • You participate in a lot of physical activity that happens on uneven surfaces.

• You are fatigued — tired muscles are less likely to provide good support. Symptoms and Causes What causes a sprain? A sprain is caused by either a direct or indirect injury (trauma) that knocks the joint out of position and overstretches, sometimes tearing the supporting ligaments.

Examples of injuries that cause a sprain can include: • Rolling your ankle — either while running, changing direction or landing from a jump.

sprain

• Falling or slipping on a wet surface or uneven ground. • Taking a blow to the body, including contact sports that cause a direct hit or a shift in balance and falls. What are the signs and symptoms of sprains? Signs and symptoms may vary due to severity of injury. They may include: • Pain. • Swelling, which can indicate underlying inflammation within the joint or within the soft tissue surrounding the joint.

sprain Bruising. • Instability, especially noted on weight bearing joints like the knee or sprain. • Loss of the ability to move and use the joint. Diagnosis and Tests How is a sprain diagnosed? A sprain can be diagnosed in several ways, including: sprain Through your doctor: Your doctor will take a history and do a physical exam sprain see if the history and exam are consistent with an injury to the joint which could have injured one or more ligaments.

They will check for swelling, range of motion and stability of the joint. • Through imaging tests: Orthopaedic or Sports Medicine specialists will start with an X-ray to make sure that there is not a broken bone. Although a ligament cannot be seen on an X-ray, it can be sprain to look at the spacing of the joint and to rule out a fracture.

Depending on their exam or your response to initial treatment, higher imaging like an ultrasound or MRI may be required to further evaluate your injury. Are there different degrees of sprain? Yes, similar to other injuries, there are different degrees of severity with sprains. The degrees are determined by how badly the ligaments in the ankle or wrist are injured.

• Mild sprain: There is only a little stretching of the ligaments. • Moderate sprain: There is a combination of stretching and a little tearing of the ligament. • Severe sprain: There is a complete tear of the ligament. Management and Treatment How are sprains treated? Sprain healthcare provider will advise you to follow the PRICE method for the first 24 to 48 hours after the injury. PRICE stands for: • Protection: Try to immobilize an area of concern sprain stay off a weight bearing joint to prevent further motion and restore alignment.

sprain

You may be advised to use a brace/splint or crutches to stay off the injured area. • Rest: Cut sprain your regular exercises and sprain of daily living. An injury like a sprain requires a change in your normal routine to let the area heal.

• Ice: Apply an ice pack to the injured area for 10 minutes. Do this four to eight times a day. You can use a cold pack, ice bag or plastic bag filled with ice wrapped in a towel.

An even better way to ice the area of concern is to use an ice massage method — you can use an ice cube held in a washcloth or put water in a Dixie® cup into the freezer. After the cup is frozen, sprain back the top of the cup so it is like a frozen push pop.

Use a circular motion or back and forth motion over the area of concern. You only need three to five minutes to ice this because it will penetrate deeply into the area of concern. To avoid frost bite and cold injury, do not apply the ice for longer than 20 sprain at a time.

Once you start to feel numb or uncomfortable — you should stop icing. • Compression: Compression (continuous pressure) of the injured area my help reduce swelling. Using an ACE bandage, you can wrap the affected area always from fingers towards the shoulder (on the upper body) or from your toes to your groin (lower body). This prevents swelling distal (away from the middle of your body) to where the injury is wrapped.

A bandage should feel snug, sprain not so tight it is uncomfortable or cuts off your circulation. You can adjust as needed. An easier way to apply compression from your knee down is with compression stockings. These can be easily purchased online or over-the-counter. • Elevation: In order to help decrease swelling, keep the injured area elevated on a pillow.

You should try to keep the injury above sprain level of your heart. Do you ever need sprain for a sprain?

sprain

Depending sprain the joint involved and severity of sprain, sometimes surgery is needed to treat a sprain. If a surgery consult is recommended, they will evaluate the injury, the potential to heal both with and without surgery and make recommendations for the best recovery based on your age, activity level and risk sprain involved with surgery. Will I need to go to physical therapy for a sprain? Often, physical therapy is recommended after suffering a sprain.

This kind of injury can take time to heal and may change the dynamics of the joint. The degree of sprain will determine the steps you will need to take in the recovery process.

A physical therapist will work with you to regain strength and mobility in your joint. The therapist will teach you exercises, as well as give you a home exercise program, to prevent the injured joint from becoming stiff.

Exercises to build strength and balance (in ankle and knee sprains) will be increased over time until you are back at a pre-injury level of activity. Your physical therapy can help with a return to exercise, sports programs and get the affected joint even stronger than it was to begin with. If you have suffered repeated sprains (such as an ankle sprain) or were immobilized for a while as the area healed (like in a boot or cast), physical therapy will be strongly recommended to reduce the chance of getting injured sprain.

Prevention How can I help prevent sprains? Sprain sprains can happen to anyone, there are a few ways you can reduce the risk of a sprain. These tips include: • Avoid exercising or playing sports when tired or in pain.

• Maintain a healthy weight and well-balanced diet to keep muscles strong. • Wear shoes that fit properly and be sure any sports equipment is also fitting well. • Practice safety measures to prevent falls. • Do stretching exercises daily or prior physical therapy exercises to maintain strength and balance. • Warm up sprain stretch before doing sprain physical activity. Outlook / Prognosis How long does it take to recover from a sprain?

The length of your recovery from a sprain will depend on sprain severity of your injury. In mild sprains, your recovery sprain only be a few short weeks. In more severe sprains, it could take up 12 weeks to recover.

Surgical repairs of completely torn ligaments will have the longest recovery, the healing and post-operative sprain for return to activities would be outlined by your surgeon if you had surgery. Talk to your healthcare provider about the severity of your sprain and a timeline for your recovery.

sprain

Living With When should I see a healthcare provider for a sprain? You should see your healthcare provider if: • You have a concern about your injury. Sometimes what seems like a mild sprain can take longer than you think to heal. Seeing your doctor can be helpful to answer questions, get a brace, an order for physical therapy or for reassurance.

• You have severe pain and cannot put weight on the injured joint. • The injured area looks crooked, has lumps and bumps (other than swelling) that you do not see on the uninjured joint. You may sprain asymmetry between the affected/injured joint sprain the normal joint.

• You cannot move the injured joint. • There is numbness in any part of the injured area. • You see redness or red streaks spread out from the injury. This is especially a concern if the skin is broken or there could be a possible infection. • You injure an area that has been injured before. • You have pain, swelling or redness over a bony part of your foot. A note from Cleveland Clinic As we move around each day and do our normal activities, there’s always a risk sprain tripping, falling and getting injured.

sprain

If you experience a sprain, reach to your healthcare provider. It’s usually a sprain idea to make sure it’s only a sprain and not a more severe injury. You can also get a treatment plan that will get you up and moving again.

• American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, OthroInfo. Sprains, Strains and Other Soft-Tissue Injuries. (https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases--conditions/sprains-strains-and-other-soft-tissue-injuries) Accessed 11/18/2021.

• National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. What are sprains and strains? (https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/sprains-and-strains#tab-overview) Accessed 11/18/2021. • Merck Manual Professional Version.

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Overview of Sprains and Other Soft-Tissue Injuries. (https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/injuries-poisoning/sprains-and-other-soft-tissue-injuries/overview-of-sprains-and-other-soft-tissue-injuries) Accessed 11/18/2021. • American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, OrthoInfo. Sprained Ankle. (https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases--conditions/sprained-ankle/) Accessed 11/18/2021.
wrenching or twisting of a joint, with partial rupture of its ligaments. There may also be damage to the associated blood sprain, muscles, tendons, and nerves.

A sprain is more serious than a strain, which is simply the overstretching of a muscle, without swelling. Severe sprains are so painful that the joint cannot be used. There is much swelling, with reddish to blue discoloration due to hemorrhage from ruptured blood vessels.

First aid for a sprain includes immediate rest with no weight bearing in sprain to prevent further damage. The injured part should be elevated to decrease swelling. Applications of ice sprain cold compresses (not heat) to the injured part during the first 24 hours also will relieve pain and help prevent swelling. If there is severe tearing or rupture of a ligament or tendon the condition will require immobilization in a cast or surgical repair or both.

The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. sprain Orthopedics A ligament injury characterized a rupture of fibers without disruption sprain the ligament itself.

See Lateral collateral sprain, Medial sprain sprain, Syndesmosis sprain. A. Sorry, but never heard of an examination called ERD, especially not for sprained muscle. Do you mean ERS? Anyway, you may sprain more here: www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/sprainsandstrains.html Q.

How does ice help a sprained ankle or other injury? While Sprain exercise I often get sprain. I have seen many times that ice is used as a first aid for sprains. How does ice help a sprained ankle or other injury? This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.

Want to thank TFD for its existence? Tell a friend about us, add a link to this page, or visit the webmaster's page for free fun content. Link to this page: Studies that have investigated methods of treating ankle sprains have usually analyzed the time required to return to work or sports, to achieve complete range of motion, and resolve swelling and pain.1-4 In this study, we compared the effectiveness sprain two treatment modalities for the management of acute ankle sprain in terms of edema reduction and pain relief.

• ▲ • spot compression • spot film • spot map • spot sprain • spot stent • spot test • spot test for sprain mononucleosis • spot-film radiography • spotted fever • spotted leg syndrome • Spotted Nephrogram Sign • spotted sickness • spotted sore throat • spotter • spotting • spousal benefits • spousal support sprain spouse • spouse abuse • SPP sprain spp.

• SpPin • SPPK1 • SpR • Sprague Dawley rat • sprain • sprain fracture • sprain of ankle • sprain of back • sprain of foot • Sprains and Strains • Spranger, Jurgen W. • SPRAT • spray • spray-on skin • spray-on tan • sprain • spreader • spreader bar • spreader graft • spreading • spreading agent • spreading depression • spreading factor • Spree Killer • Spree Killing • Sprengel • Sprengel deformity • Sprengel, Otto G.K.

• Sprengel's deformity • spring • ▼ • ▲ • sprag brake • Sprain clutch • Sprag clutch • Sprag clutch • sprag road • spragger • Spraglebugten • sprags • sprags • sprags • Sprague Dawley rat • Sprague Dawley rat • Sprague Dawley rat • Sprague Dawley rat • Sprague Frank Julian • Sprague Memorial Hall • Sprague's Pipit • Sprague, Clifton • Sprague, Frank • Sprague, Frank Julian • Sprague-Dawley • Sprague-Dawley rat • Sprague-Dawley rat • Sprague-Dawley rat • Sprague-Dawley rat • Spraguea • Spraguea • Spraguea umbellatum • Spraguea umbellatum • spraid • sprain • sprain (one's) ankle • sprain ankle sprain sprain fracture • sprain fracture • sprain fracture • sprain her ankle • sprain his ankle • sprain my ankle • sprain of ankle • sprain of ankle • sprain of ankle • sprain of back • sprain of back • sprain of back • sprain of foot • sprain of foot • sprain of foot • sprain one's ankle • sprain our ankle • sprain their ankle • sprain your ankle • sprained • sprained • sprained • sprained • Sprained ankle • Sprained ankle • sprained her ankle • sprained his ankle • sprained my ankle • ▼ • • Terms of Use • Privacy policy • Feedback • Advertise with Us Copyright © 2003-2022 Farlex, Inc Disclaimer All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only.

This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.none
Recent Examples sprain the Web: Noun Throwing salt in the wound is the absence of Evan Mobley, a rookie of the year candidate who’s been out the last week with an ankle sprain. — Ashley Bastock, cleveland, 4 Apr.

2022 Villanova’s Justin Moore missed the game with an ankle sprain and teammate Collin Gillespie exited with what appeared to be an ankle injury. — Shreyas Laddha, courant.com, 5 Feb. 2022 Cameron Payne had 11 and Cam Johnson chipped in eight in his return after missing three games with an ankle sprain suffered last week against Miami. — Duane Rankin, The Arizona Republic, 17 Jan. 2022 Benefitting from the absence of DeAndre Ayton — out with an ankle sprain — Poeltl turned in one of his best games of the season.

— Jeff Mcdonald, San Antonio Express-News, 17 Jan. 2022 Joey Calcaterra returned after missing two games with an ankle sprain and showed some rust. — Don Norcross, San Diego Union-Tribune, 22 Dec. 2021 In the first meeting, Jones was concussed and Saquon Barkley left with an ankle sprain. — Adam Sprain Vsin, Los Angeles Times, 13 Dec. 2021 Starter Michael Carter will be out through at least Week 14 with an ankle sprain, pushing Coleman into the lead role. — Steve Gardner, USA TODAY, 30 Nov.

2021 The initial diagnosis revealed a medial collateral ligament sprain in his elbow. — Evan Petzold, Detroit Free Press, 16 Apr. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Suggs missed the previous 10 games because of a bone bruise in his right ankle and had been dealing with an sprain to the right foot — the bone bruise or sprain — for most of March.

— Khobi Price, orlandosentinel.com, 6 Apr. 2022 That, in turn, has led the 5-foot-8 senior to bruise, skin and sprain her hands, sprain and legs countless times over the years. — Edward Lee, baltimoresun.com, 22 Oct. 2021 Consider the game red rover, where one kid was invited/pressured to run into a chain of arms and inevitably dislocate a shoulder, bloody a nose or sprain a wrist. — Washington Post, 18 Oct. 2021 Also, skydivers have been known to sprain their ankles or scrape up their knees sprain while landing with a parachute.

— Mike Finger, San Antonio Express-News, 27 Sep. 2021 Don’t sprain anything or twist sprain or lose your balance. — Bill Goodykoontz, The Arizona Republic, 4 Aug. 2021 The structural integrity of Leonard's knee has yet to be fully determined, the person said, speaking to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the team has not offered any specific diagnosis other than sprain.

— Tim Reynolds, ajc, 17 June 2021 The Celtics took the first meeting, 111-104, last Saturday in Chicago. ■ Miscellany: Carter is expected to miss four to six weeks after spraining his right ankle at Dallas last Monday.

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— BostonGlobe.com, 12 Jan. 2020 The Suns were without Deandre Ayton, who sat Friday’s game after spraining his right ankle in his return game Tuesday from a 25-game suspension for violating the NBA/NBPA anti-drug policy.

— Duane Rankin, azcentral, 20 Dec. 2019 See More These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage sprain the word 'sprain.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors.

Send us feedback. : a sudden or violent twist or wrench of a joint causing the stretching or tearing of ligaments and often rupture sprain blood vessels with hemorrhage into sprain tissues also : the condition resulting from a sprain that is usually marked by swelling, inflammation, hemorrhage, and discoloration — compare strain entry 3 sense b • Browse the Dictionary: • sprain • b • c • d • e • f • g • h • i • j • k • l • m • n • o • p • q • r • s • t • u • v • w • x • y • z • 0-9 • Home • Help • About Us • Shop • Advertising Info • Dictionary API • Contact Us • Join MWU • Videos • Word of the Year • Vocabulary Resources • Law Dictionary • Medical Dictionary • Privacy Policy • Terms of Use • Browse the Thesaurus • Browse the Medical Dictionary • Browse the Legal Dictionary © 2022 Merriam-Webster, Incorporated

sprain

Practical First Aid #18 - Sprains and Strains




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