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university of toronto

Toronto, Ontario, Canada Mascot Lion Website www .vicu .utoronto .ca Victoria University is a federated college of the University of Toronto, founded in 1836 and named in honour of Queen Victoria. It is commonly called Victoria College, informally Vic, after the original academic component that now forms its undergraduate division. Since 1928, Victoria College has retained secular studies in the liberal arts and sciences while Emmanuel College has functioned as its postgraduate theological college.

Victoria operated as an independent institution until its federation with the University of Toronto in 1890, relocating from Cobourg to Toronto. [3] Victoria is situated in the northeastern part of the university campus, adjacent to St.

Michael's College and Queen's Park. Among its residential halls is Annesley Hall, a National Historic Site of Canada. A major centre for Reformation and Renaissance studies, Victoria is home to international scholarly projects and holdings devoted to pre- Puritan English drama and the works of Desiderius Erasmus.

Contents • 1 History • 2 Sites and architecture • 3 Academics and organization • 4 Student life • 4.1 Residential halls university of toronto houses • 5 Vic One • 5.1 Streams • 5.1.1 Chambers – Commerce, Economics, & Policy • 5.1.2 Education – Education & Society • 5.1.3 Frye – Literature & the Humanities • 5.1.4 Gooch – Philosophy & Ethical Citizenship • 5.1.5 Jewison – Creative Arts & Society • 5.1.6 Pearson – History, Politics & Social Sciences • 5.1.7 Schawlow – Physical & Mathematical Sciences • 6 Board of Regents • 7 Administrators • 8 Notable alumni and faculty • 9 References • 10 Further reading • 11 External links History [ edit ] Upper Canada Academy in Cobourg, 1863 (Victoria University Archives).

Victoria College was founded as the Upper Canada Academy by the Wesleyan Methodist Church. In 1831, a church committee decided to locate the academy on four acres (1.6 hectares) of land in Cobourg, Ontario, east of Toronto, because of its central location in a large town and access by land and water.

In 1836, Egerton Ryerson received a royal charter for the institution from King William IV in England, while the Upper Canadian government was hesitant to provide a charter to a Methodist institution. This was the first charter ever granted by the British Government to a Nonconformist body for an educational institution.

[4] The school officially opened to male and female students on October 12, 1836, with Matthew Richey as principal. [5] Although the school taught a variety of liberal arts subjects, it also functioned as an unofficial Methodist seminary.

In 1841, it was incorporated as Victoria College, named in honour of Queen Victoria, and finally received a charter from the Upper Canadian Legislature. [6] Victoria University formed in 1884 with the merger of Victoria College and Albert College in Belleville. In 1890, due to financial and geographic difficulties, Victoria University federated with the University of Toronto.

In 1892, Victoria University moved from Cobourg to its current campus on Queen's Park Crescent, south of Bloor Street (at Charles Street West), in Toronto. A plaque was erected at 100 University Avenue at the intersection with College Street in Cobourg, Ontario.

Victoria College The cornerstone of this building was laid June 7, 1832, and teaching began in 1836. First operated under a royal charter by the Wesleyan Methodists as Upper Canada Academy, in 1841 it obtained a provincial charter under the name of Victoria College, giving it power to grant degrees. Victoria's first president was the Reverend Egerton Ryerson, newspaper editor and founder of Ontario's present educational system. In 1890 the college federated with the University of Toronto and, in 1892, left Cobourg.

Old Vic in Toronto, 1900 James Loudon, a former president of the federated universities, had prohibited dancing at the University of toronto of Toronto until 1896. However, dancing at Victoria was not officially permissible until thirty years later, university of toronto 1926.

King George V gifted to Victoria College a silver cup used by Queen Victoria when she was a child and the Royal Standard that had flown at Osborne House and was draped on the coffin of the Queen when she died there in 1901. [7] Two bronze plaques on either side of the South door of Victoria College were erected as memorials dedicated to the students of Victoria College who lost their lives in the First and Second World Wars.

The WWI list of honour was erected by the Alumni and Alumnae Associations on October 13, 1923, while the WWII list of honour was erected by the Board of Regents. [8] In 1928, the independent Union College federated with the theology department of Victoria College, and became Emmanuel College. On the Old Ontario Strand for piano by Joyce Belyea was published for the Victoria College Music Club between 1946 and 1948 by the J.H.

Peel Music Pub. Co. in Toronto. [9] Sites and architecture [ edit ] Victoria College is somewhat separated from the rest of the University of Toronto geographically, bordering Queen's Park, and being located on the eastern portion of the campus along with St. Michael's College. The main building, Old Vic, an example of Richardsonian Romanesque architectural style, was built in 1891.

The architect was W. G. Storm, who died shortly after completion. The campus is centred on the main quadrangle of Victoria, outlined by the upper and lower houses of Burwash Hall. The oldest residence building at Victoria is Annesley Hall.

Built in 1903 and renovated in 1988, it is a National Historic Site of Canada located across from the Royal Ontario Museum. Annesley Hall was the first residence built specifically for women in Canada. Old Vic in 2021 Burwash Hall is the second oldest of the residence buildings at Victoria. Construction began in 1911 and was completed in 1913. It was named after Nathanael Burwash, a former president of Victoria. The building is an extravagant Neo-Gothic work with turrets, gargoyles, and battlements.

The architect was Henry Sproatt. The building is divided between the large dining hall in the northwest and the student residence proper. The residence area is divided into two sections. The Upper Houses, built in 1913, consist of four houses: North House, Middle House, Gate House, and South House. The Lower Houses were built in 1931 and were originally intended to house theology students at Emmanuel College, whose current building was opened the same year. First House, Nelles House, Caven House, Bowles-Gandier House are now mostly home to undergraduate arts and science students.

The latter two are mostly reserved for students in the Vic One Programme. To the west the Upper Houses look out on the Vic Quad and the main Victoria College building across it. West of the University of toronto Houses is the new Lester B.

Pearson Garden of Peace and International Understanding and the E.J. Pratt Library beyond it. From the eastern side of the building, the Upper Houses look out at Rowell Jackman Hall and the Lower Houses see the St. Michael's College residence of Elmsley. The only exceptions are the view from Gate House's tower that looks down St. Mary's Street and the view from the south side of Bowles-Gandier house, which looks upon the main quadrangle of St.

Michael's University College. Rowell Jackman Hall, is the newest of Vic's residences, having been completed in 1993. It is named after Mary Rowell Jackman whose son Hal Jackman made a substantial donation to the project. It stands just to the east of Burwash Hall on Charles St. and is west of St. Michael's College Loretto College.

Before Rowell Jackman Hall was built, the site was home to a parking lot and the university of toronto Stephenson House. Prior to construction Stephenson House was moved to a new location further east on Charles St. The building's construction caused some controversy as it greatly disrupted life in Burwash. Margaret Addison Hall is a seven-floor co-ed residence across Charles St.

from Burwash Hall, between the Goldring Student Centre and the Victoria sports field. E.J. Pratt Library is the main library of Victoria University. [10] It was built in 1961 and is located at the south end of the quadrangle. The site of the library and the adjacent Northrop Frye Building was originally on the route of Queen's Park Crescent.

The road was pushed south into Queen's Park to make way for the new buildings. [ citation needed] Academics and organization [ edit ] Northrop Frye Hall Victoria University is governed bicamerally by the Victoria University Board of Regents and the Victoria University Senate. These bodies are represented by faculty, administrators, elected students and alumni.

The colleges are governed by the Victoria College Council and Emmanuel College Council. College councils are represented by faculty, administrators and elected and appointed students. Victoria's governing charter was most recently amended in 1981, with the enactment of the Victoria University Act. [11] Victoria is presently the wealthiest college at the University of Toronto by net assets. In part this has been because of alumni donations, but much of the growth is specifically due to the rapidly increasing value of Victoria's large real estate holdings in downtown Toronto.

Today, the college has a securities portfolio worth approximately $78 million and a real estate portfolio worth $80 million. [12] The E.J. Pratt Library is the main library for Victoria College.

The collection of approximately 250,000 volumes is geared towards the undergraduate programs at Vic and contains mainly humanities texts with a focus on History, English, Philosophy. [10] The library also hosts rich archival special collections from notable alumni and faculty, historical figures, specific literary collections and Canadiana.

[13] The library also oversees Victoria University's institutional archives. [14] The Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies is located within the E.J. Pratt Library. Its holdings fall into three main categories: rare books, most of which were printed before 1700 (currently about university of toronto titles), modern books and microforms (several thousand microfiches and reels).

The library contains primary and secondary materials relating to virtually university of toronto aspect of the Renaissance and Reformation. In particular, it houses the Erasmus collection, one of the richest resources in North America for the study of works written or edited by the great Dutch humanist Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam.

The collection holds a substantial number of pre-1700 editions of his works, including the Novum Instrumentum of 1516. The E.J. Pratt Library The academic programs of the college include Literary Studies, Semiotics and Communication Theory, Renaissance Studies, the Vic Concurrent Teacher Education Program (developed in conjunction with OISE/UT) and the first-year undergraduate programs Vic One and Vic First Pathways. [15] Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS) is a research and teaching centre in Victoria University devoted to the study of the period from approximately 1350 to 1700.

The CRRS supervises an undergraduate program in Renaissance Studies, organizes lectures and seminars, and maintains an active series of publications. The centre also offers undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral fellowships.

From 1976 to 2009, the performance history research and publishing project Records of Early English Drama (REED) was based at Victoria University. Student life [ edit ] Inside Burwash Dining Hall Campus life for Victoria students is active and varied.

Victoria College has levy receivers, student organizations that directly receive a fixed amount of funding from students every year, as well as clubs whose funding are overseen by the Victoria University Students' Administrative Council (VUSAC).

Prominent clubs include The Boundary (the college's satire paper), [16] the Environmental Fashion Show, Vic Dance and the Victoria College Chorus. [17] Levy receivers are students groups with special status based on providing an essential service for student life, and levy heads university of toronto also assessor members in VUSAC.

Victoria's eleven levy receivers are: [18] • Acta Victoriana, the college literary journal. • Victoria College Drama Society (VCDS), which runs at least four shows per year [ citation needed] (a fall show, a winter show, a submission to the University of Toronto Drama Festival, and a musical) • The Strand, Vic's student-run newspaper that is distributed fortnightly across the University of Toronto's downtown campus.

• Victoria College Athletics Association (VCAA), which provides students with a chance to participate and compete in intramural sports. • The Cat's Eye, a student lounge in the Goldring Student Centre building that is often used to hold events.

• WUSC, which sponsors a student from a developing country to come to the University of Toronto. • Caffiends, Vic's student-run fair trade organic cafe. • University of toronto, an LGBTQ organization that strives to create a safe space at Victoria. • Student Projects, a fund available to students to finance projects that will enrich student life. • VicXposure, a photography group offering workshops, equipment rentals and darkroom use.

• VISA, the Victoria International Students Association. Victoria is also home to the Isabel Bader Theatre, opened in March 2001. During the past few years the theatre has been used as university of toronto lecture hall for University of Toronto students, an active learning space for Victoria University students groups, numerous concerts, film screenings, conferences, and theatrical productions, including the annual sophomore tradition launched in 1872, The Bob Comedy Revue, each written, directed, produced and performed by students such as Lester B.

Pearson, Norman Jewison, E. J. Pratt, Northrop Frye, and Margaret Atwood. [19] Residential halls and houses [ edit ] Annesley Hall Annesley Hall is the all-female residence at Victoria College. Annesley Hall is the first university residence built for women in Canada. [20] Burwash Hall residences consist of the Upper and Lower Houses, each type differing slightly in their layout. The Upper Houses were gutted and renovated in 1995. The Lower Houses have only been partially upgraded.

Before the renovations the entire building was all male, but now every house in Burwash is co-ed. Gate House is one of the four Upper Houses of Burwash Hall.

Until 2007, when Victoria administration made it co-ed, Gate House was one of the last remaining all-male residence building in the University of Toronto. [21] The Gate House emblem is the Phoenix, visible in the bottom-right corner of the Victoria College insignia. Gate House, with the rest of Upper Burwash, opened in 1913 and has held students every university of toronto since then except 1995, when it was renovated. [22] The eight storey Rowell Jackman Hall building is an apartment style residence with each floor divided into a number of suites.

The interior is ascetic: a combination of plastic runners and gray linoleum tile. When it was completed Rowell Jackman Hall was mainly home to upper years and graduate students. Today it only houses undergrads and has a considerable number of first years, except for International House, which continues to house a number of upper years.

Stephenson House was a community involvement residence at Victoria University and hosted ten undergraduate students per year. Stephenson House was self-governed and self-regulating with a separate application and selection process. It last functioned as a residence in the 2009–2010 academic year. Vic One [ edit ] Launched in 2003, the Vic One program is an academic opportunity for first-year students at the University of Toronto to build communication and leadership skills in a small classroom setting.

[23] Applications typically open in December for any student who is applying to the University for enrolment in the following September.

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{INSERTKEYS} [24] The Vic One program supplements a student's primary program of study in the form of weekly small group seminars and guest lectures from professors, visiting artists, writers, ambassadors and other public figures.

[25] There are eight academic streams of Vic One, each focussing on a different discipline. Enrolment in each stream is limited to 25 students, with a maximum of 250 students in the program each year.

[24] Streams [ edit ] Chambers – Commerce, Economics, & Policy [ edit ] Named for Margaret Chambers (Vic 3T8), founding member of The Co-operators. Education – Education & Society [ edit ] Originally named Ryerson, for the first principal of Victoria College, Egerton Ryerson.

The name of the program was changed in September 2019 due to Ryerson's involvement with the residential school system in Canada. [26] Frye – Literature & the Humanities [ edit ] Named for Victoria University principal, chancellor and student, Northrop Frye (Vic 3T3), a Canadian literary critic and theorist. Gooch – Philosophy & Ethical Citizenship [ edit ] Named for Victoria University president, Paul W. Gooch, a Canadian philosopher and founding member of the Vic One program. Jewison – Creative Arts & Society [ edit ] Named for Norman Jewison (Vic 4T9), a Canadian film director and producer.

Pearson – History, Politics & Social Sciences [ edit ] Named for Lester B. Pearson (Vic 1T9), former Prime Minister of Canada. Schawlow – Physical & Mathematical Sciences [ edit ] Named for Arthur Leonard Schawlow (Vic 4T1), American physicist and Nobel Prize winner. Board of Regents [ edit ] The Board of Regents is the governing body of Victoria University.

The Board appoints the Chancellor, the President, the College Principals, the officers of the University, and appoints and promotes the teaching staff of Victoria and Emmanuel Colleges. [27] Term Chair [28] 1884 - 1914 Albert Carman (Vic 1855) 1914 - 1928 Samuel Dwight Chown (Vic 1877) 1928 - 1933 Newton Wesley Rowell 1933 - 1934 Alfred Ernest Ames 1934 - 1942 James Russell Lovett Starr (Vic 1887) 1942 - 1951 Wilfrid Crossen James (Vic 1T6) 1951 - 1958 Leopold Macaulay (Vic 1T1) 1958 - 1962 Henry Eden Langford (Vic 2T8) 1962 - 1971 Ralph Shaw Mills (Vic 2T5) 1971 - 1974 Frederick Arthur Wansbrough (Vic 2T8) 1974 - 1978 Donald Walker McGibbon (Vic 3T2) 1978 - 1982 G.

Dennis Lane (Vic 5T5) 1982 - 1985 Henry Jonathon Sissons (Vic 3T7) 1985 - 1989 David Walter Pretty (Vic 4T7) 1989 - 1992 Ruth Marion (Manning) Alexander (Vic 5T0) 1992 - 1995 Paul Wesley Fox (Vic 4T4) 1995 - 1998 Richard P.K. Cousland (Vic 5T4) 1998 - 2001 Elizabeth (Eastlake) Vosburgh (Vic 6T8) 2001 - 2004 David E. Clark (Vic 7T1) 2004 - 2007 Frank Mills (Vic 6T8) 2007 - 2010 Murray Corlett (Vic 6T1) 2010 - 2014 Paul Huyer (Vic 8T1) 2014 - 201 John Field (Vic 7T8) 2018 - 2021 Lisa Khoo (Vic 8T9) 2021 - Cynthia Crysler (Vic 9T0) Administrators [ edit ] Principal [29] [3] President [29] [3] Chancellor [30] Upper Canada Academy (1836 - 1841) Matthew Richey (1836 - 1840) Jesse B.

Hurlburt (1840 - 1841) Victoria College (1841 - 1884) Egerton Ryerson (1841 - 1847) Alexander MacNab (1847 - 1849) Matthew Richey (1849 - 1850) John Wilson (1849 - 1850) Egerton Ryerson (1850 - 1854) Samuel S. Nelles (1850 - 1884) Samuel S. Nelles (1854 - 1884) Victoria University (1884 - ) Samuel S. Nelles (1884 - 1887) Nathaneal Burwash (1887 - 1912) Richard Pinch Bowles (1913 - 1930) Edward Wilson Wallace (1930 - 1932) Walter Theodore Brown (1932 - 1941) Edward Wilson Wallace (1932 - 1941) Harold Bennett (1941 - 1959) Walter Theodore Brown (1941 - 1944) H.

Northrop Frye (1959 - 1966) Walter Theodore Brown (1944 - 1949) Alexander Charles Spencer (1944 - 1951) John Edwin Hodgetts (1967 - 1970) Harold Bennett (1949 - 1950) Lester Bowles Pearson (1952 - 1959) John Mercel Robson (1971 - 1976) Arthur Bruce Barbour Moore (1950 - 1970) Louis Orville Breithaupt (1959 - 1960) Gordon Lincoln Keyes (1976 - 1981) John Edwin Hodgetts (1970 - 1972) H.

Northrop Frye (1978 - 1991) Alexandra Ferguson Johnston (1981 - 1991) Goldwin S. French (1973 - 1987) Sang-Chul Lee (1992 - 1998) William J. Callahan (1991 - 2000) Eva Milada Kushner (1987 - 1994) Kenneth D. Taylor (1998 - 2004) David B. Cook (2000 - 2012) Roseann Runte (1994 - 2001) Norman Frederick Jewison (2004 - 2010) Angela Esterhammer (2012 - ) Paul W. Gooch (2001 - 2015) Wendy Marion Cecil (2010 - 2017) William R. Robins (2015 - 2022) Carole (Goss) Taylor (2017 - 2020) Nick Saul (2020 - ) Notable alumni and faculty [ edit ] Famous Victoria alumni include Margaret Atwood, Lester B.

Pearson, Don Harron, and Donald Sutherland. • Margaret Atwood – author • Margaret Avison – poet • Frederick Banting – attended; Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1923 • William Black Creighton – social reformer • George Blewett – philosopher and theologian • John Clay Coleman – Methodist minister and black rights activist • John Royston Coleman – economist, president of Haverford College, host of CBS program Money Talks • Wilbur R.

Franks – noted scientist and cancer researcher • Northrop Frye – literary critic • Jessa Gamble – author and science journalist • Peter Godsoe – president and CEO of Bank of Nova Scotia, 1992–2003; chairman of Fairmont Hotels and Resorts and Sobeys, chancellor of the University of Western Ontario, 1996–2000 • Blake Goldring – executive chairman of AGF Management Limited • W.

G. Hardy – professor, writer, president of the International Ice Hockey Federation, Member of Order of Canada [31] • Don Harron – comedian • Lawrence Ho – billionaire businessman, chairman & CEO, Melco Crown • Henry Horricks – pacifist and anti-racism activist • Norman Jewison – former chancellor of Victoria University and Academy Award-winning (Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award) filmmaker • Ted Jolliffe – Rhodes scholar and first leader of the Ontario section of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) • Ndahura II Imara Kashagama – King of Busongora Kingdom [Central Africa] • Andromache Karakatsanis – Canadian Supreme Court justice – first Greek-Canadian judge on the court • Jay Macpherson – poet • Don McKellar – actor and filmmaker • John Fletcher McLaughlin – prominent theologian • Philip Orsino – president and CEO of Masonite International Corporation, 1989–2005 • Richard Outram – poet • Steve Paikin – journalist • Lester B.

Pearson – former Prime Minister of Canada and Nobel Laureate • E. J. Pratt – poet • Laure Rièse – first female faculty member • Egerton Ryerson – one of the founders of Victoria College and its first president • Nick Saul - Canadian food and social justice activist, author • Arthur L. Schawlow – physicist, Nobel laureate • Arthur Sifton – second premier of Alberta • Augusta Stowe-Gullen – first woman to graduate from a Canadian medical school • Donald Sutherland – Academy Honorary Award-winning actor • Carole Taylor – former minister of finance of British Columbia, former chancellor of Simon Fraser University • Kenneth D.

Taylor – former chancellor of Victoria University and former Canadian ambassador to Iran • Vaira Vīķe-Freiberga – 6th president of Latvia • Ian Williams - writer, 2019 Giller Prize winner • Bob Young – entrepreneur, co-founder of Red Hat • J.

Lavell Smith – anti-war activist References [ edit ] • ^ "Victoria University : Financial Statements : April 30, 2019" (PDF). Vicui.utoronto.ca . Retrieved May 8, 2020. • ^ Liang, Xuelun (2020). University of Toronto Facts and Figures (PDF). Office of Government, Institutional and Community Relations. • ^ a b c Burwash, Nathaneal (1927). History of Victoria College. Toronto: Victoria College Press. • ^ Burwash, Nathaneal (1927).

History of Victoria College. Toronto: Victoria College Press. p. {/INSERTKEYS}

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41. • ^ The Project Gutenberg EBook #6466 of 'The Intellectual Development of the Canadian People, A historical review' by John George Bourinot, House of Commons, Ottawa, February 17th, 1881 • ^ Pound, Richard W. (2005). Fitzhenry and Whiteside Book of Canadian Facts and Dates.

Fitzhenry and Whiteside. • ^ Rynor, F. Michah (2001). "Royal Gems". UofT Magazine. Toronto: University of Toronto (Winter 2001). Retrieved 3 October 2009. • ^ "Archived copy". www.cmp-cpm.forces.gc.ca. Archived from the original on 8 September 2012. Retrieved 14 January 2022. {{ cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title ( link) • ^ Canada, Library and Archives (27 November 2008).

"Link to this page". Amicus.collectionscanada.gc.ca. Retrieved 20 December 2018. • ^ a b "About the Library - About Us - E.J. Pratt Library". library.vicu.utoronto.ca.

Retrieved 2021-08-19. • ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-08-20. Retrieved 2018-12-20. {{ cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title ( link) • ^ University of Victoria.

(2020. Statement of University of toronto Information. https://www.uvic.ca/vpfo/accounting/reports/uvicfinancialstatements/FIA-2019-20.pdf • ^ "Special Collections - Collections - E.J. Pratt Library".

library.vicu.utoronto.ca. Retrieved 2021-08-19. • ^ "About the Archives - Archives - E.J. Pratt Library". library.vicu.utoronto.ca. Retrieved 2021-08-19. • ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-03-29. Retrieved 2007-04-12. {{ cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title ( link) • ^ "The Boundary". The Varsity.

Retrieved 2020-12-13. • ^ "VUSAC – CLUBS". Victoria-university. Retrieved 20 December 2018. • ^ "VUSAC". Vusac.ca. Retrieved 2016-09-11. • ^ "Despite cuts and critics, Bob carries on". Thenewspaper.ca. Retrieved 20 December 2018.

university of toronto

• ^ "Annesley Hall National Historic Site of Canada". Canada's Historic Places. Parks Canada. Retrieved university of toronto. Annesley Hall was designated a national historic site because it is a particularly good example of the Queen Anne Revival style, as expressed in institutional architecture.

Designed by architect G. M. Miller, and built in 1902-1903, Annesley Hall was the first purpose-built women's residence on a Canadian university campus.

• ^ Taylor, Bill (2007-12-19). "Party's over at U of T residence". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2007-12-19. • ^ Houghton, Sarah (2003-03-12). "One Hundred Years of Architecture". The Strand. Archived from the original on 2007-05-25. Retrieved 2007-06-05. • ^ "#UofTGrad2016: Oxford-bound grad found time to do nearly everything at U of T". University of Toronto News. Retrieved 2022-01-12.

• ^ a b "Vic One » Victoria College". vic.utoronto.ca. Retrieved 2022-01-12. • ^ "A Rhodes Scholar and student leader, U of T grad Ikran Jama brought her community into the classroom". University of Toronto News. Retrieved 2022-01-12. • ^ Alam, Khadija (2020-03-17). "Remembering Ryerson".

The Strand. Retrieved 2022-01-12. • ^ "Board of Regents » Victoria University". vicu.utoronto.ca. Retrieved 2022-03-04. • ^ "Board of Regents » Victoria University". university of toronto. Retrieved 2022-02-02.

• ^ a b Sissons, C. B. (1952). A History of Victoria University. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. • ^ "Victoria University Chancellor » Victoria University". vicu.utoronto.ca. Retrieved 2021-09-30. • ^ Peacock, Jim (May 3, 1958). "Writing Is His Hobby". Lethbridge Herald.

Lethbridge, Alberta. p. 4. Further reading [ edit ] • Martin L. Friedland The University of Toronto: A History university of toronto University of Toronto Press © 2002) • Neil Semple Faithful Intellect: Samuel S. Nelles And Victoria University (Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, September 1, 2004) • C. B. Sissons A History of Victoria University. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1952.

External links [ edit ] Wikimedia Commons has media related to Victoria University, Toronto. Coordinates: 43°40′1″N 79°23′31″W  /  43.66694°N 79.39194°W  / 43.66694; -79.39194 • Official website • Archival papers of William James Callahan, President of Victoria College (1991-2000), held at the University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services • Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering • Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design • Faculty of Arts and Science • Department of Mathematics • Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics • Munk School of Global Affairs • Dalla Lana School of Public Health • Faculty of Dentistry • Fields Institute • Faculty of Information • Faculty of Law • Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies • Faculty of Medicine • Faculty of Music • Faculty of Pharmacy • School of Public Policy and Governance • Ontario Institute for Studies in Education • Institute of Child Study • Rotman School of Management • Toronto School of Theology • Libraries • Gerstein • Mississauga • Robarts • Thomas Fisher Places • Annesley Hall • Back Campus Fields • Bahen Centre • Chestnut Residence • Convocation Hall • Goldring Centre • Graduate House • Hart House • Koffler Student Centre • Massey Building • Newman Centre • Philosopher's Walk • President's Estate • Queen's Park • Soldiers' Tower • 1 Spadina Crescent • Stewart Observatory • Toronto Pan Am Sports Centre • Varsity Arena • Varsity Stadium Culture • Coat of arms • Students' Union • The Varsity • The Newspaper • The Medium • Massey Lectures • Watts Lectures • CIUT-FM • Hart House Theatre • Hart House Review • Varsity Blues • Football • Men's university of toronto hockey • Women's ice hockey • Rowing university of toronto Men's soccer • Jennings Cup • Blue Sky Solar Racing • Toronto School Related Hidden categories: • University of toronto maint: archived copy as title • Articles with short description • Short description is different from Wikidata • Articles using infobox university • All articles with unsourced statements • Articles with unsourced statements from April 2008 • Articles with unsourced statements from May 2020 • Commons category link is on Wikidata • Coordinates on Wikidata • Articles with ISNI identifiers • Articles with VIAF identifiers • Articles with WORLDCATID identifiers • Articles with GND identifiers Edit links • This page was last edited on 7 April 2022, at 21:37 (UTC).

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• Privacy policy • About Wikipedia • Disclaimers • Contact Wikipedia • Mobile view • Developers • Statistics • Cookie statement • • • Where To Eat • Meal Plans Show submenu for Meal Plans • Residence Meal Plans • Meal Plan Budget Calculator • Buy TBucks • Nutrition Show submenu for Nutrition • Food Allergies & Dietary Restrictions • Menus and Nutrition Information • Nutrition Blog • Catering & Events Show submenu for Catering & Events • Event Applications and Guidelines • About Show submenu for About • Mobile Order App • News • Recipes • Our Team • Sustainability • Alcohol Policy • FAQ • Contact Open Search Buy University of toronto Submit Search DINING UPDATES We are happy to announce that the Envision report is available to review.

To view and learn more about the report please visit here. Our Sidney Smith, Robarts, and MSB Dining Halls are open during the Summer Semester. The New College Dining Hall is currently closed, and will reopen in July. The Chestnut Dining Hall is currently closed, and will reopen Sunday, May 8th. The CampusOne Dining Hall is open for breakfast only. Please check out our Where To Eat page for specific location hours and updates. Food Services is working to keep our students, faculty, staff and guests safe: • Enhanced staff training in health and safety regulations.

• Physical Distancing • Wellness Checkpoints • Making use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) • Cleaning and Disinfection • Ensuring Proper Hand Hygiene For more information visit the Food Services Covid-19 update page here. Provincial regulations and public health guidance now require post-secondary institutions to implement COVID-19 health screening for anyone coming to campus. This means that all members of our community, including staff, and students, must complete a self-assessment each day they visit any one of the three U of T campuses or any other property owned or operated by U of T.

There are two ways to complete the required self-assessment and generate a risk status each time you come to U of T: by using UCheck, or by completing a paper-based or offline self-assessment log. Please visit this COVID-19 self-assessments page for more information. The University of Toronto, in partnership with Thrive Health, has launched the UCheck self-assessment web portal to support the health and safety of the entire U of T community.

Students living in residence are asked to generate a COVID-19 risk status daily by completing a quick and thorough self-assessment.
Living in Residence Immerse yourself in university life by living on campus. Each U of T campus has a range of housing options that will help you integrate into a fun, supportive and close-knit community at the University. Walk to classes, on-campus events, athletic facilities and libraries. Take part in movie nights, recreational sports events, study groups and club activities.

And find convenient and helpful services, from healthy dining options and laundry facilities, to city tours and academic mentorships. Living in residence is a great way to kick off your university experience. Find out more about U of T housing services at UTM, UTSC and St. George. Residence Guarantee Residence is guaranteed for all new full-time students entering their first year of university in an undergraduate program for the first time, provided that they have indicated their interest in residence and met all of our deadlines.

UPDATE FOR FALL 2021: The health and safety of the U of T community is our top priority. The University is looking toward Fall 2021 with optimism, and we are hopeful that public health conditions will allow us to house all eligible first-year students.

However, provincial health regulations continue to guide our work and will determine the total number of spaces in residence as well as our ability to honour the first-year residence guarantee.

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Find more details about residence for fall 2021 here. University of toronto Communities Students experience diverse communities, are surrounded by places to explore and have access to nearby amenities.

• Living at U of T St. George • Living at U of University of toronto Mississauga • Living at U of T Scarborough Off-Campus Housing Some students opt to live off campus in one of the Greater Toronto Area’s many student-friendly and culturally diverse neighbourhoods.

If you decide to find your own housing arrangement, the University’s housing offices can help you navigate the rental market and find the best fit. Browse the University of Toronto’s off-campus rental housing listings, and find another student to share a rental unit, using our Roommate Finder service.

Access the University of Toronto’s off-campus rental housing supports. Mississauga Campus Residence Options With the University of Toronto Mississauga’s Academic Living Communities, first-year students share residence space with students in the same, or a similar academic discipline.

Live in traditional-style dormitories or townhomes, and take part in a variety of seminars, social events and study sessions. Upper-year students often live in residence in student leadership roles like dons or residence advisors. Others live in shared apartment-style housing. Accessible units are available in both first-year and upper-year residences. Accommodations have elevators, automated door openers, braille signage and other features that make them as equitable and inclusive as possible.

UTM Housing Options UTM’s Academic Living Communities Accessibility in UTM Residences See UTM Residence Fees Residence Tours Take a virtual tour of UTM residences, or sign up for an in-person tour.

You can also visit residences through a regular campus tour, although access is restricted at certain times during the year to respect student study spaces.

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Explore UTM Residence with a Virtual Tour Sign up for a Campus Tour Off Campus Housing Information Looking for a place to live off-campus?

Are you searching for a room-mate? UTM students can visit the University of Toronto off-campus housing finder for a range of housing listings in the city of Mississauga and the surrounding area.

This registry is updated through the Housing Services Department at the St.George Campus. Contact UTM Student Housing & Residence Life if you have questions about off-campus housing. St. George Campus Residence Options Located in the urban core of downtown Toronto, the University of Toronto’s St.

George campus residences provide students with a comfortable home-away-from-home. Whether living in one of the St. George campus’ seven colleges, or in the Chestnut Residence, students experience a tight-knit community feel within the country’s top research university.

In addition to residence living, St. George campus’ colleges also serve as community hubs. They sponsor specialized academic programs and provide student services, dining options and cultural spaces.

The residences that you are eligible for depend on which Faculty you join. Students in the Faculty of Arts and Science are all members of a college, even university of toronto they decide not to live in residence. Students in other Faculties are not a member of a college, but they can still live in most college residences. • University of toronto of Arts & Science residence details • Professional Faculty residence details Each of the residence options has a distinctive character and legacy.

Most have dormitory-type accommodation, while some have shared apartment-style or hotel-style units. Accessible accommodations are available. • Find out more about the residence options at U of T St. George • Find out more about choosing an Arts & Science College • See U of T St.

George residence fees Connect with Housing Services at U of University of toronto St. George for any residence questions! Residence Tours If you’re considering living in residence and are able to visit the campus, you should come for a free tour of the different housing options.

Look up the current Residence Tour Schedule. Find out more about Residence Tours. Residence Videos Get a first-hand look at what residence life is like from our current students: • Laviniya at Victoria College • Kevin at St. Michael’s College • Osman at New College • Chiao at Innis College • Kate at University College • Madeleine at Woodsworth College • Kate at St.

Michael’s College (Loretto College) • Sam at Trinity College Off Campus Housing Information Looking for a place to live off-campus? Are you searching for a room-mate? St. George Campus students can visit the University of Toronto off-campus housing finder for a range of housing listings in the city of Toronto university of toronto the surrounding area.

This service also includes extensive tenant resources university of toronto a Roommate Finder program that allows you to post a roommate profile and view profiles of other U of T students looking for off-campus housing who share your interests, habits and housing needs.

Contact U of T St. George Housing Service s if you have questions about off-campus housing. Scarborough Campus Residence Options Living in residence has many advantages, including proximity to campus, a supportive learning environment and leadership opportunities.

The University of Toronto Scarborough offers townhouse and apartment suites, the majority of which have single rooms. Accessible accommodations are available. UTSC townhouses are within a five-minute walk to classes and facilities. Each unit is shared among four to six students, and is fully furnished with bedrooms, one or two bathrooms, a kitchen, storage area and living/dining room.

They are in the most scenic areas of campus and most have single-occupancy bedrooms. The Joan Foley Hall apartment building features three- and four-bedroom units, equipped with two bathrooms, a full kitchen, a living/dining room and a storage room.

Each floor has a common room with a view of the scenic Highland Creek Valley. Find out more about residence options at U of T Scarborough See UTSC Residence Fees Residence Tours Take a virtual tour of UTSC residences, or come for an in-person tour.

You can visit residences through a regular campus tour, although access may be restricted during exams to respect study space. Explore UTSC Townhouses with a Virtual Tour Explore UTSC Apartments with a Virtual Tour Sign up for a Campus Tour Off Campus Housing Information Searching for off-campus housing and living in an unfamiliar area can feel intimidating, especially if it’s for the first time. UTSC has developed a series of resources to help guide you to successful off-campus living.

The online resources will help walk you through the process of finding a place to live, and provide you with tips and resources to ease the transition.

They have tried to include all that is relevant to living off-campus, learn more. Canada Coordinates: 43°47′01″N 79°11′8″W  /  43.78361°N 79.18556°W  / 43.78361; -79.18556 Campus Suburban, 123 hectares (300 acres) [3] Website www.utsc.utoronto.ca The University of Toronto Scarborough, also known as U of T Scarborough or UTSC, is one of the three campuses that make up the tri-campus system of the University of Toronto.

Located in Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, the campus is set upon suburban parkland in the residential neighbourhood of Highland Creek. It was established in 1964 as Scarborough College, a constituent college of the Faculty of Arts and Science. The college expanded following its designation as an autonomic division of the university in 1972 and gradually became an independent institution.

It ranks last in area and enrolment size among the three University of Toronto campuses, the other two being the St. George campus in Downtown Toronto and the University of toronto of Toronto Mississauga. Academics of the campus are centred on a variety of undergraduate university of toronto in the disciplines of management, arts and sciences, whilst also hosting limited postgraduate research programs.

Its neuroscience program was the first to be offered in the nation. The campus is noted for being the university's sole provider of cooperative education programs, as well as the Bachelor of Business Administration degree.

Through affiliation with the adjacent Centennial Science and Technology Centre of Centennial College, it also offers enrolment in joint programs. The campus has traditionally held the annual F. B. Watts Memorial Lectures, which has university of toronto internationally renowned scholars since 1970. Its nuclear magnetic resonance laboratory was the first of its kind in Canada, allowing the campus to conduct influential research in the environmental sciences.

The original building of the campus was internationally acclaimed for its architectural design. The Dan Lang Field, home to the baseball team of the Toronto Varsity Blues, is also situated at the campus. Contents • 1 History • 2 Grounds • 2.1 Campus • 2.2 Architecture • 2.3 Expansion • 3 Academics • 4 Student life • 4.1 Student centre • 4.2 Media and Greek life • 4.3 Residences • 5 Notable alumni • 5.1 Academics (Arts) • university of toronto Artists • 5.3 Athletes • 5.4 Business, Entrepreneurs, Philanthropists • 5.5 Journalists and Media Personalities • 5.6 Politicians/ Public Servants • 5.7 Scientists/ Medical Professionals • 6 References • 7 External links History [ edit ] The 152-hectare (380-acre) land along the university of toronto of the Highland Creek in Scarborough, Ontario was purchased in 1911 by Toronto-based businessman Miller Lash, who developed the site into his summer estate with a mansion, today known as the Miller Lash House.

The mansion included 17 rooms, a barn, a coach house, and three houses for his staff to dwell. Over the following years, over 100 acres of the estate was also used as farmland. Following the death of Miller Lash in 1941, the estate was acquired by E.

L. McLean, an insurance broker, in 1944 for $59,000. [5] He made new additions to the estate, including a swimming pool and change room, and a retaining wall made in stone. About 82 hectares (200 acres) of property was later purchased from McLean, just before his death, by the University of Toronto for about $650,000 in 1963, as part of the university's regional expansion.

The groundskeeper of the land would continue to reside in the Highland Creek valley for the next 29 years. McLean's additions to the Miller Lash House, which would eventually become the residence of the campus's principal, were modernized and 28 hectares (70 acres) of surrounding land north of the estate were also acquired. The University of Toronto established the Scarborough College as part of the institution's collegiate university system and declared the campus a branch of the Faculty of Arts and Science.

D. C. Williams was appointed as the principal of Scarborough College and the planned Erindale College, as well as vice-president of the university. The college's faculty, consisting of 16 members, was also established and headquartered at the main campus in Downtown Toronto. First classes were held at Birchmount Park Collegiate Institute and Old Biology Building at the St. George campus. [6] Designed by John Andrews, the first building of the campus began construction the following year.

[7] Due to delays in construction after a strike among workers, the Scarborough College opened in temporary classes at the main campus to 191 full-time students in 1965.

The first building was completed in time for the following academic year. The college included a 6,000-square-foot (560 m 2) television production studio. This was for a unique video lecturing system the college was initially planned to have, that relies on the use of closed circuit television for teaching purposes. [8] The system grabbed international media attention, and was complimented in the 1967 edition of Time. [9] However, the video lecturing system was abandoned after it was condemned for the lack of communicability of students with instructors.

In 1972, the campus was reorganized as a separately governed division of the university's Faculty of Arts and Science, developing its own curriculum.

In 1973, it became the first post-secondary institution to adopt a course credit system in Ontario and the first cooperative education program was established.

The campus adopted its present official name in 2006 after being renamed University of Toronto Scarborough Campus in 1983 and University of Toronto at Scarborough in 1996. The initials UTSC comes from the former name and continue to be used by the university to distinguish the campus from University of Toronto Schools (UTS).

Grounds [ edit ] Campus [ edit ] For much of its existence, the University of Toronto Scarborough was described as a "mid-sized university campus". [10] It is the smallest of the three campuses of the University of Toronto by area. [11] [12] It sits on 123 hectares (300 acres) of university of toronto, forming the west side of the Highland Creek neighbourhood in Scarborough. It is bounded entirely by Morningside Avenue to the west.

Its eastern, northern and southern borders are not definite, however; the campus grounds extend north slightly south of Highway 401 and south slightly north of Old Kingston Road. Its eastern boundary is Military Trail while south of Ellesmere Road and university of toronto further east while north of Ellesmere Road. Unlike the university's downtown campus, the University of Toronto Scarborough is located in a suburban area, consisting of residential houses along its eastern side and urban forestry on its southern and western side.

The neighbourhood's namesake river runs through the southern portion of the grounds and its valley consists of pedestrian trails that link the campus to nearby parks and neighbourhoods. Transit bus service by the Toronto Transit Commission, GO Transit, and Durham Region Transit connect the campus to nearby transportation hubs.

Architecture [ edit ] Looking west: Science Wing ahead, Bladen Building on the left, and the Arts and Administration Building on the right. The Andrews Building, the first completed building of the campus named after its designer, John Andrews, was built in a brutalist architectural style and completed in 1964.

[13] The interiors were made to mimic streets of a city, with wide hallways and balconies on upper floors. The building is divided into two wings, known as the Science Wing and the Humanities Wing.

The Meeting Place, a large university of toronto at the center of both wings, is often used to hold events. [9] The design of the Andrews Building, along with its unique closed circuit television teaching system, were targets of international acclaim during the decade.

[14] The 1970s and onward saw new buildings being designed in a modernist style. [15] The Recreational Wing, now known as the Bladen Wing (named after Vincent Bladen, former dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science) was completed in 1972.

The Recreation Wing (R-Wing) housed the University of Toronto Scarborough Library, then known as the Vincent W. Bladen Library. The N'Sheemaehn Child Care Centre, one of the university's non-profit child day care facilities, opened in 1990.

An underground corridor completed in 1995, known as the Hall of Excellence, connects the R-Wing (Bladen Wing) and the H-Wing (Humanities Wing). [16] Double cohort brought challenges to the teaching, study and residence spaces at the campus due to increase in first-year enrollment.

In response, the Academic Research Centre (ARC) and Joan Foley Hall were constructed. [17] The ARC was built in 2003 as an extension of the Bladen Building with a copper finish. It allowed for the relocation and expansion of the library to its present state and introduced the campus's first 300-seat lecture theatre, which has since held the Watts Lecture series, after formerly being held in the Meeting Place.

The Doris McCarthy Gallery, also found in the ARC, exhibits works by local university of toronto and campus alumni, Doris McCarthy. The Student Centre was opened in 2004 through a project that was initiated and funded by students. Constructed using 18 tonnes of recycled steel from a demolished gallery at the Royal Ontario Museum, the three-storey Student Centre earned a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification as well as a Green Design Award from the City of Toronto.

[18] The Social Sciences Building, home of the Department of Social Sciences, also opened in 2004 as the Management Wing but took its present name after the completion of the Instructional Centre in 2011, which became the new home of the Department of Management, the Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, and offices of cooperative education programs.

Brick and limestone were used to create the Arts and Administration Building, completed in 2005, [19] which holds the principal's office. [20] The Science Research Building, where post-graduate research facilities and a lecture hall are located, is an extension of the Science University of toronto that was completed in 2008. [21] Expansion [ edit ] Since 2009, the university has undertaken a proposal to substantially expand the campus north of Ellesmere Road, starting with the construction of the Instructional Centre, funded by Canada's Economic Action Plan, completed in 2011.

The Toronto Pan Am Sports Centre (built 2014) was one of the main venues of the 2015 Pan American Games and 2015 Parapan American Games. [14] The Toronto Pan Am Sports Centre brought pool facility to campus and significantly expanded the size of the gym. The Parapan American Games also brought an addition of seven accessible tennis courts to the Highland Creek valley.

The Environmental Science and Chemistry Building, completed in summer 2015, was the university of toronto building to open in the north grounds. [22] The most recent addition to campus architecture is Highland Hall, built on the university of toronto of the old gym and athletic centre. Highland Hall houses the Registrar's Office, Admissions & Recruitment, and an Event Centre.

Plans for expansion in the near future include a second Instructional Centre, [23] a new student residence, [24] and an indigenous house. [25] Academics [ edit ] The University of Toronto Bookstore operates a branch at Scarborough.

The campus is primarily an undergraduate institution, thus it attracts the most direct-entry applicants from secondary schools among the university's three campuses. [26] The campus has 14 academic departments: [27] • The Department of Anthropology • The Department of Arts, Culture and Media • The Department of Biological Sciences • The Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences • The Department of English • The Department of Historical and Cultural Studies • The Department of Human Geography • The Department of Language Studies • The Department of Management • The Department of Philosophy • The Department of Physical & Environmental Sciences • The Department of Political Science • The Department of Psychology • The Department of Sociology The Centre for Critical Development Studies is an extra-departmental unit.

Students are diversified among concentrations that are specialist degrees, as well as the common majors and minors. The cooperative education programs, which place students for up to three semesters in workplaces pertaining to their field of study, are unique to the campus in the University of Toronto. Joint programs with Centennial College, that award both a university degree and a college diploma, are offered in journalism, new media, paramedicine, industrial microbiology, and environmental science.

[28] Service-learning course is also offered. [29] Eleven departments of the campus contain programs that award a Bachelor of Arts degree. University of toronto department of Anthropology offers interdisciplinary programs in health studies and on the subject of humanity.

At the Department of Arts, Culture and Media, courses in visual and performing arts, new media, and journalism are taught. It is also one of the only two universities in Ontario that grants an undergraduate degree in arts management.

The department of English provides study on English literature and film studies. Centre for Critical Development Studies offers both arts and science degree on international development issues. The Department of Language Studies offers courses in non-English languages, linguistics, and psycholinguistics.

Department of Historical and Cultural Studies teaches African studies, classical studies, global Asia studies, history, food studies, religion, and women's studies. The department of Human Geography oversees programs in city studies, physical and human geography. The department of philosophy offer programs in philosophy and ethics. Department of Political Science includes programs in political science, public law, and public policy while the Department of Sociology offers courses in sociology and migration studies.

The university has five departments in the sciences, which award a Bachelor of Science degree. The Department of Biological Sciences offers programs and courses related to the biological and life sciences; it houses at least one Biosafety level 3 laboratory. [30] The Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences teaches computer science, mathematics and statistics.

The Department of Physical & Environmental Sciences oversees programs in physics, astronomy, environmental sciences and chemistry. The Department of Psychology includes programs in psychology, mental health and neuroscience. The department of Anthropology could also award Bachelor of Science degree, in addition to Bachelor of Arts degree.

The Bachelor of Business Administration with co-op option degree is also unique to the campus. It is awarded by the programs in the Department of Management, which offers specialist degrees with fields in marketing, human resources, finances, accounting, information technology and economics.

Four graduate programs are based on the campus. The Department of Physical & Environmental Sciences offers masters and doctoral degrees in environmental science. The Department of Psychology offers an MA and PhD combined program in clinical psychology.

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The most recent graduate program offered through the Department of Management is the Masters of Accounting and Finance which provides accreditation pathways for both the CPA and CFA designation. The campus is also home to various interdisciplinary research centres and extra-departmental research clusters that are unique to the university. These include the: [31] • Centre for Biological Chemistry • Centre for Ethnography • Centre for the Neurobiology of Stress • Centre for Planetary Sciences • Culinaria Research Centre • Environmental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Centre • Integrative Behaviour and Neuroscience Group • Plant Cellular and Molecular Processes Group Student life [ edit ] Student centre [ edit ] The Student Centre is a landmark for student activities at the campus.

The Student Centre is a three-story 48,000-square-foot (4,500 m 2) building, where the office of the Scarborough Campus Students' Union (SCSU), office of Student Affairs of the University of Toronto Scarborough, as well as other offices of student clubs and organizations, are located. It also contains a television lounge, food court, health and wellness centre, and multifaith prayer room.

[32] The Rex's Den is a pub and dine-in restaurant located in the first floor of the Student Centre. It was formerly operated as The Bluffs, which opened subsequently after the opening of the Student Centre but re-opened with its present name and improved service in 2009.

[33] Media and Greek life [ edit ] Student media on the campus include Radio Forward (formerly Fusion Radio), the campus's student-run internet radio station, and The Underground, the campus's official student news outlet.

The campus also receives distributions of The Varsity. Greek life at University of Toronto Scarborough includes two sororities: Chi Sigma Xi multicultural sorority [34] and Delta Alpha Theta - Gamma chapter. In addition to this there is also one fraternity Xi Alpha Pi multicultural fraternity.

[35] None of these organizations has a house. As per their policy, the University of Toronto does not officially recognize fraternities or sororities. Residences [ edit ] Student residence is located primarily in the southernmost part of the campus, consisting mostly of townhouse-style homes and the Student Centre.

The first residence area, the Student Village, which was able to accommodate 250 students, was opened in 1973 after pressure from traveling students. [36] The townhouses are split into different halls, each bearing a different type of wood's name, in alphabetical order.

These 'Phase university of toronto houses, the ones originally part of the Student Village, include Aspen, Birch, Cedar, Dogwood, and Elm hall. The next 'Phase 2' halls erected include Fir, Grey Pine, Hickory, and Ironwood hall. 'Phase 3' are the townhouses located north of the main campus, near the Science Research building, include Juniper, Koa, Larch, and Maple Hall. Over 600 people can live in the townhouses. [37] The townhouses feature shared university of toronto areas, kitchens, and bathrooms for students.

The four-story-high Joan Foley Hall, opened in 2003, is the first apartment-style residence complex on campus, named after the campus's first female principal. It accommodates 230 people. [38] It is a suite-style dorm with shared common areas, kitchens, and bathrooms per unit.

The building is equipped with an elevator. It is located in the Southern Residence area. The Student Residence Centre, a white building located next to Joan Foley Hall, is where the administration for the housing is run, and acts as a common area for all residence students. It handles all mail for students, and has some supplies such as garbage bags and light bulbs available for students to use.

All housing has both shared and single bedrooms available, as well as housing periods dependent upon semester. Student housing has a 'first-year guarantee' where first-years who apply before a certain deadline are guaranteed to find housing. Notable alumni [ edit ] Noted professors and researchers at the University of Toronto Scarborough include poet Daniel Scott Tysdal, zoologist Fred Urquhart and writer-researcher Norah Urquhart who tracked the migration of monarch butterflies, [39] historian and author Modris Eksteins, and Laura-Ann Petitto, a multiple award-winning American cognitive neuroscientist and psychologist who has performed influential research in various branches of neuroscience using humans and chimpanzees.

[40] The campus has educated a fair number of noted persons involved in a variety of fields. Academics (Arts) [ edit ] • Prof. Trelani Chapman, assistant professor of psycholinguistics at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, specializing in the causes of typical and atypical disorders among children (HBA 2009) [41] [42] • Dr.

Michael Degagné, Order of Canada, Order of Ontario and Queen's Diamond Jubillee Medal recipient for his work with indigenous communities and reconciliation. Former President of Nipissing University, became the first indigenous president of a Canadian university. [43] [44] • Prof. John Harrichand, assistant professor in the Department of Counseling at The University of Texas at San Antonio (Hons.B.Sc 2008) [45] • Prof.

Marnie Jull, associate professor of conflict analysis and management at Royal Roads University (BA 1991) [46] • Prof. Adrian De University of toronto, free-lance poet, author of Rouge, assistant professor of American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. Researcher of indigeneity, settlers of color, and labor politics in Scarborough and the Filipino diaspora across the Pacific.

(BA 2014) [47] • Prof. Adam Yao Liu, assistant professor of political science and researcher of authoritarian politics, Chinese politics, and political economy at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy (BA 2009) [48] [49] • Prof.

Rashelle Litchmore, assistant professor of human development and cultural psychology, specializing in race and education at Connecticut College (B.Sc 2008) • Prof. Shirin Montazer, associate professor of sociology at Wayne State University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, specializing in immigration, mental health and neighborhood contexts (BA 2002) [50] [51] • Prof.

Camille A Nelson, Professor of Law and Dean at the University of Hawaii's William S. Richardson School of Law, specializing in comparative law and critical race theory (BA 1991) [52] • Prof.

John Pierce, Professor Emeritus of geography specializing in economic and resource geography, former Dean of Arts and Social Sciences, and former Dean of the Faculty of Environment at Simon Fraser University (BA 1970) [53] [54] • Prof.

Sasha Reid, former sessional instructor of sociology at the University of Calgary, known for her database on serial killers and predicted that the string university of toronto disappearances from the Church Gay village was the work of a serial killer (B.Sc 2011) [55] • Dr.

Cynthia Wesley-Esquimaux, inaugural Indigenous Chair in Truth and Reconciliation in Canada and Vice Provost for Indigenous Initiatives at Lakehead University, specializing in Historic Trauma and its impacts on Indigenous peoples (BA 1985) [56] Artists [ edit ] • Norm Hacking, Canadian folk music singer-songwriter [57] • Prof.

Will Kwan, globally renowned Hong-Kong Canadian interdisciplinary artist Associate Professor of Studio Art at the University of Toronto Scarborough's Department of Arts, Culture and Media and at the Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design (BA 2002) [58] [59] • Cybill Lui, [60] investment banker turned producer and founder of Anova pictures (BBA 2002) • Doris McCarthy, Toronto-based artist, famously known for her landscape paintings of Canada (BA 1989) [61] • Tea Mutonji, Canadian writer university of toronto poet, author of short story collection "Shut Up You're Pretty"winner of the Ontario Creates Trillium Book Award (BA 2018) [62] • Derek Tsang, Oscar-nominated Hong-Kong based filmmaker and actor (BA 2001) [63] [64] Athletes [ edit ] • Ruvindu Gunasekera, youngest-ever Canada national cricket university of toronto player [65] • Kaley McLean, former Canadian paralympian swimmer, silver and gold medalist at the Cerebral Palsy International Sports and Recreation Association (CP-ISRA) World Championship, and member of the International Paralympic Committee (BA 2007) [66] [67] • Cindy Nicholas, marathon swimmer and former MPP of Scarborough Centre [68] • Victoria Nolan"the metronome", rower for Canada's National Adaptive Rowing Team, bronze, silver and gold medals at the World Rowing Championships (B.Sc 1996) [69] • Gord Stellick, sports broadcaster and former Toronto Maple Leafs General Manager Business, Entrepreneurs, Philanthropists [ edit ] • Preet Banerjeehost of the television show Million Dollar Neighbourhood on the Oprah Winfrey Network, a personal financial expert, and winner of the reality TV series The Ultimate W Expert Challenge (B.Sc 2001) [70] • Tenniel Chu, Vice Chairman of Mission Hills Group, owner and operator of the Mission University of toronto golf and leisure resorts in Shenzhen and on the island of Hainan, China.

(BA 1999) [71] • Charles Cutts, Governor General of Canada's Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal recipient for contributions to art & culture, former President & CEO of The Corporation of Massey Hall and Roy Thomson Hall (BA 1969) [72] • Dr. Jon Dellandrea, philanthropist and fundraiser, Order of Canada ‘06 recipient for contributions to higher education President & CEO of Sunnybrook Hospital and former Vice-Chancellor at University of Toronto and the University of Oxford and University of toronto of Nipissing University (BA 1973) [73] • Derrick Fung, CEO of Drop, co-founder and former CEO of Tunezy, Forbes 30 under 30 in Music (BBA 2009) [74] • Dr.

Ravi Gukathasan, Tamil-Canadian philanthropist and founder of Digital Specialty Chemicals (DSC) (B.Sc 1982) [75] • Reetu Gupta, CEO & President of the Gupta Group and University of toronto Easton's Group of Hotels, Canada's Top 40 under 40 (BBA 2005) [76] • Chloe Ho, co-founder of Pixie Mood, a Vegan Leather Accessories Company that was featured in Forbes magazine and Oprah Winfrey’s 2019 List of Favorite Things (B.Sc 2006) [77] • Satish Kanwar, co-founder of Jet Cooper Forbes 30 under 30 in ecommerce and retail (BBA 2008).

[78] • Alek Krjstajic, former CEO of Wind Mobile and founder of Public Mobile (BA 1989) [79] • Prof Venkat Kuppuswamy, assistant professor of entrepreneurship and innovation at the D'Amore-McKim School of Business university of toronto Northeastern University (B.Sc 2006) [80] • Steve Lau, co-founder of Highland Creek Partners, co-founder of AutoLeap and partner at Whitecap Venture Partners, Canada’s Top 40 under 40 (BBA 2005) [81] • Mabel Lee, founder & CEO of Velour Beauty (BBA 2010) [82] • Prof Yutao Li, associate professor of accounting specializing in corporate financial and non-financial disclosure at the University of Lethbridge's Dhillon School of Business (BBA 2004) [83] • Prof Chris Ling, assistant professor of marketing specializing in consumer behaviour at the Degroote School of Business at McMaster University (BBA 2010) [84] • Prof Juan Ma, assistant professor of strategy at Institut Européen d'Administration des Affaires (INSEAD) University specializing in international corruption and institutional distrust (BBA 2011) [85] [86] • Neil Selfe, founder & CEO of INFOR Financial Group, Canada's leading independent merchant banking and advisory firm (B.Comm 1988) [87] • Arvin Singh, co-founder and COO of Hoolah, Asia’s leading Omni-channel buy now pay later platform (BBA 2008) [88] • Axel Villamil, co-founder & CEO of StageKeep and founder & creative director of Redlabel Studios(B.Sc 2016) [89] Journalists and Media Personalities [ edit ] • Alexandra Gater, interior design vlogger and consultant, host of the shows “Buy or DIY” and “Make My Space Work”, Class of 2020’s Design Change-makers.

(BA 2015) [90] [91] • Karen K. Ho, global finance and economics reporter for Quartz, most known for her covering of Crazy Rich Asians which made the cover of Time Magazine (BA 2010) [92] • Emily HunterCanadian environmental activist, Flare magazine's “14 Canadians under 30 to watch” author and filmmaker (HBA 2011) [93] [94] • Hamza Khan, multi-award winning speaker and marketer, author of the Amazon best-selling book “The Burnout Gamble”, managing director of Student Life Network, lecturer specializing in digital marketing at Ryerson University's Ted Rogers School of Management (BA 2010) [95] [96] • Nancy Newman, Emmy-Award winning sportscaster, anchor and reporter for YES, former reporter for CNN and NBC (BA 1988) [97] [98] • Vijaya Silvaraju, cooking expert, food guru, host of the show “One World Kitchen”, often featured on the Marilyn Denis show and Taste made (BBA 2008) [99] • Prof.

Christopher Waddell, Professor Emeritus and Former Directors of the School of Journalism and Communication at Carleton University, Carty Chair in Business and Financial Journalism (BA 1974) [100] [101] Politicians/ Public Servants [ edit ] • Margarett Best, former Member of Provincial Parliament for Scarborough–Guildwood • Bill Blair, Member of Parliament Scarborough Southwest (2015-Pres), President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Emergency Preparedness(2021-Pres), [102]former Chief of Toronto Police Service (2005-2015), former Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness (2019-2021)(BA 1980) [103] • Mary Anne Chambers, former Member of Provincial Parliament and former Minister of Children and Youth Services Sports (BA 1988) [104] • Adrian Foster, three-term Mayor of the City of Clarington, Ontario and recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal for his community service (BA 1983) [87] • Goldie Ghamari, Current Member of Provincial Parliament for Carleton, Chair of Standing Committee on General Government (BA 2008) [105] • Jay C.

Hope, highest-ranking Black police officer in Canadian History, former deputy chief of the Ontario Provincial Police; deputy minister of emergency planning and management; and commissioner of Emergency Management Ontario and commissioner of community safety for the Province of Ontario, and deputy minister of correctional services for the Province of Ontario. (BA 1979) [94] [106] • Mitzie Hunter, Member of Provincial Parliament for Scarborough Guildwood, former Associate Minister of Finance, former Minister of Education, and former Minister of Advanced Education and a Skills University of toronto (BA 1999) [107] • Laura Mae Lindo, Member of Provincial Parliament for Kitchener Centre, critic on Anti-Racism, Colleges & Universities, and citizenship and immigration (BA 1998) [108] • John McKay, Member of Parliament for Scarborough Guildwood (2004-present), former Member of Parliament for Scarborough East (1997-2004), former Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance (2003-2006), former Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Defense (2015-2017) [109] [110] • Jennifer McKelvieToronto City Councillor for Scarborough-Rouge Park (B.Sc 2000) [111] • Mary NgMember of Parliament Scarborough-Guildwood, Minister of Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade (BA 1996) [103] • David Onley, the 28th and former Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario (BA 1975) [112] • Michael Prue, former three-term Member of Provincial Parliament representing Beaches-East York, former mayor of East York, and current town councillor of Amherstburg, Ontario (BA 1971) [94] • Harkirat Singh, Brampton City Councillor of Wards 9 and 10 (BA 2009) [113] • Bryon J.

Wilfert, former Member of Parliament for Richmond Hill, Consul General of Myanmar and recipient of the Order of the Rising Sun (BA 1975) [114] [115] University of toronto Medical Professionals [ edit ] • Prof.

Blair Armstrong, assistant professor of Linguistics, specializing in psycholinguistics and the cognitive neuroscience of Language at the University of Toronto Scarborough’s Department of Language Studies (B.Sc 2006) [116] • Prof. Rob Brander, Professor of coastal geomorphology at the University of New South Wales, known as Dr. Rip, the expert warning people around the world about the perils of rip currents (B.Sc 1989) [117] • Prof. Rick Dale, Professor of Cognitive Science and Communications, specializing in quantifying the dynamics of communication at UCLA's Department of Communication (BA 2000) [118] • Prof.

Lukasz Gulab, Canada Research Chair in Data Analytics for Sustainability, Associate Professor at the School of Computer Science and the Department of Management at the University of Waterloo (B.Sc 2001) [119] • Dr. Everton Golden, Chief of Otolaryngology at North York General Hospital and assistant Professor at the Temerty Faculty of Medicine (B.Sc 1991) [120] • Dr. Efrar Habsha, Staff Prosthodontist at Mount Sinai Hospital, founder of Women in Dentistry and Fellow of the Royal College of Dentists of Canada (RCDC) (B.Sc 1991) [121] • Prof.

Brian Harrington, associate professor of computer science at the University of Toronto Scarborough’s Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences (B.Sc 2004). [122] • Prof. Dean Hay, Professor specializing in biomechanics at Nipissing University's School of Health and Physical Education (B.Sc 1995) [123] • Prof.

Kris Kim, assistant professor of biochemistry at the University of Toronto Scarborough's Department of Environmental Sciences and Chemistry (B.Sc 2012) [124] • Prof. Norman Lee, assistant professor of biology specializing in neural systems and behaviour at St. Olaf's College (B.Sc 2005) [125] • Prof. Jana Lok, assistant professor specializing in complementary therapies and nursing pedagogy at the Bloomberg School of Nursing at the University of Toronto (B.Sc 2001) [126] • Prof.

Allison McDonald, associate professor specializing in bioenergetics at Wilfrid Laurier University's Department of Biology (Ph.

D 2007) [127] • Prof. Jason Ozubko, associate professor specializing in human memory at SUNY Geneseo's Psychology Department (B.Sc 2005) [52] • Prof. Todd Smith, Professor of biology specializing in Microbial Biodiversity, Eukaryotic Microbiology and Parasitology at Acadia University (B.Sc 1992) [128] • Prof.

Ashwini Tiwari, assistant professor at Augusta University's Department of Psychiatry and Health Behaviour (B.Sc 2007) [80] • Prof. Zeynep Yilmaz, assistant professor and neurogeneticist specializing in the genetics of food disorders the at the University of Carolina Chapel Hill, School of Medicine (B.Sc 2004) [129] References [ edit ] • ^ Campbell, Don (2014-12-12).

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Retrieved 2020-11-29. • ^ "Degrees and academic positions". www.acadiau.ca. Retrieved 2020-12-12. • ^ "Zeynep Yilmaz". Department of Psychiatry. Retrieved 2020-11-29. External links [ edit ] Wikimedia Commons has media related to University of Toronto Scarborough. • Official website • Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering • Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design • Faculty of Arts and Science • Department of Mathematics • Dunlap Institute university of toronto Astronomy & Astrophysics • Munk School of Global Affairs • Dalla Lana School of Public Health • Faculty of Dentistry • Fields Institute • Faculty of Information • Faculty of Law • Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies • Faculty of Medicine • Faculty of Music • Faculty of Pharmacy • School of Public Policy and Governance • Ontario Institute for Studies in Education • Institute of Child Study • Rotman School of Management • Toronto School of Theology • Libraries • Gerstein • Mississauga • Robarts • Thomas Fisher Places • Annesley Hall • Back Campus Fields • Bahen University of toronto • Chestnut Residence • Convocation Hall • Goldring Centre • Graduate House • Hart House • Koffler Student Centre • Massey Building • Newman Centre • Philosopher's Walk • President's Estate • Queen's Park • Soldiers' Tower • 1 Spadina Crescent • Stewart Observatory • Toronto Pan Am Sports Centre • Varsity Arena • Varsity Stadium Culture • Coat of arms • Students' Union • The Varsity • The Newspaper • The Medium • Massey Lectures • Watts Lectures university of toronto CIUT-FM • Hart House Theatre • Hart House Review • Varsity Blues • Football • Men's ice hockey • Women's ice hockey • Rowing • Men's soccer • Jennings Cup • Blue Sky Solar Racing • Toronto School Related Hidden categories: • CS1 errors: generic name • CS1 errors: missing title • CS1 errors: bare URL • CS1 maint: url-status • All articles with bare URLs for citations • Articles with bare URLs for citations from May 2022 • Articles with short description • Short description is different from Wikidata • Use Canadian English from October 2017 • All Wikipedia articles written in Canadian English • Coordinates on Wikidata • Articles using infobox university • Commons category link is on Wikidata Edit links • This page was last edited on 1 May 2022, at 06:39 (UTC).

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