Musa paradisiaca

musa paradisiaca

• × • Forum • Fragram • News • Perfumes • Search • Designers • Countries • Parent Companies • Industries • Notes • Perfumers • Search by notes • Perfume Finder • Groups • Colors • Awards • Awards 2021 • Awards 2020 • Awards 2019 • Awards 2018 • Awards 2017 • About • Notes • Perfumers • Forum • Fragram • About Musa Paradisiaca by Cristian Cavagna is a Floral Fruity fragrance for women and men.

This is a new fragrance. Musa Paradisiaca was launched in 2021. Musa paradisiaca Paradisiaca was created by Cristian Cavagna and Arturetto Landi. Top notes are Tuberose, Banana Leaf, Celery and Ginger; middle notes are Tuberose, Narcissus and Ylang-Ylang; base notes are Tuberose, Ambergris, Civet, Sandalwood, Cacao, Tonka Bean and Vanilla Absolute. Read about this perfume in other languages: Deutsch, Musa paradisiaca, Français, Italiano, Русский, Polski, Português, Ελληνικά, 汉语, Nederlands, Srpski, Română, العربية, Українська, Монгол, עברית.

Musa Paradisiaca is a very well balanced perfume, i surely didnt expect this to be this well constructed. After some recent rants of disappointment from well established houses and new perfumers i am glad that some people still care about the art and craft of perfumery.

So.it is a tuberose, but rather smooth one, it has green tone to it, but never goes into galbanum territory, there is underlying freshness almost like ambroxan - but it is infinitely more pleasant than that horrible molecule. It is closer to laundry powder, or crisp white shirt - but it has that soapiness well tamed. There is very slight sweetness musa paradisiaca if there is green mango in the play, but its not strong, just keeps other notes in check. I am not big into tuberoses, and in fact this is 4th tuberose perfume i tried, but it is probably better than Carnal flower, nuit de bakelite, and tauers gardenia.

Musa Pqradisiaca, if my memory serves well, could be a child of those 3, but infinitely more balanced. It is quite natural smelling as well, good projection and great longevity. Id suggest doing only 1 spray as it is strong. For lovers of tuberose - a must try, maybe even a safe blind buy.

For new people to this genre - definitely give it a test, i am sure ull be pleasantly surprised :) Probably the best tuberose of mine heard along with nuit de bakelite.

with nuit de bakelite it shares some green notes. this is a green-sweet tuberose in the best sense that can be given to the term sweet. it is not an old style woman's tuberose sweetness but it is definitely a modern unisex tuberose. where there is sweetness there is immediately a green counterpart, almost bitter. celery is there but not as strong as the celery that we break to eat it, but it still gives a good idea. a celery less green and fresh than the real one.

the banana leaf mon I could never really smell it but I think it is that beautiful fresh note that allows this masterpiece to be used even in warmer climates. ginger has not reached me. the narcissus with its intoxicating and opulent floral animalic smell with musa paradisiaca undertones and a hint of and tobacco is fantastic. the rich ylang ylang with its rich, also opulent and banana odor, almost dirty and sour is gorgeous.

'is without a doubt but without a urinary or annoying connotation and in any case for me it is in the background. let's say that it makes the smell of the flowers increase. It gives a feeling of warmth and radiance to the flowers. the rest of the notes are a nice side dish . but in fact they make a wonderful side dish. in fact, vanilla and cocoa do not make it a gourmand tuberose.

they sweeten it just a little, as does the tonka bean. the ambergris gives a little warmth and the sandalwood a slight creaminess.

musa paradisiaca

so what to say. masterpiece? it comes very close to perfection. I would have liked it slightly greener. but it is my opinion. it's a nice trip and I hope christian can give us as many.

final grade 9/10 incredible performance. a must have. applause at the open stage. Probably the best tuberose of mine heard along with nuit de bakelite. with nuit de bakelite it shares some green notes. this is a green-sweet tuberose in the best sense that can be given to the term sweet. it is not an old style woman's tuberose sweetness but it is definitely a modern unisex tuberose.

where there is sweetness there is immediately a green counterpart, almost bitter. celery is there but not as strong as the celery that we break to eat it, but it still gives a good idea. a celery less green and fresh than the real one. the banana leaf mon I could never really smell it but I think it is that beautiful fresh note that allows this masterpiece to be used even in warmer climates. ginger has not reached me. the narcissus with its intoxicating and musa paradisiaca floral animalic smell with green undertones and a hint of and tobacco is fantastic.

the rich ylang ylang with its rich, also opulent and banana odor, almost dirty and sour is gorgeous. 'is without a doubt but without a urinary or annoying connotation and in any case for me it is in the background. let's say that it makes the smell musa paradisiaca the flowers increase. It gives a feeling of warmth and radiance to the flowers. the rest of the notes are a nice side dish .

but in fact they make a wonderful side dish. in fact, vanilla and cocoa do not make it a gourmand tuberose. they musa paradisiaca it just a little, as does the tonka bean. the ambergris gives a little warmth and the sandalwood a slight creaminess.

musa paradisiaca

so what to say. masterpiece? it comes very close to perfection. I would have liked it slightly greener. but it is my opinion. it's a nice trip and I hope christian can give us as many.

musa paradisiaca

final grade 9/10 incredible performance. a must have. applause at the open stage. Jump to the top Fragrantica in your language: - Deutsch - Español - Français - Italiano musa paradisiaca Русский - Polski - Português - Ελληνικά musa paradisiaca 汉语 - Nederlands - Srpski - Română - العربية - Українська - Монгол - עברית - Luxois Watches - Beauty Almanac - Copyrights © 2006-2022 Fragrantica.com perfumes magazine - All Rights Reserved - do not copy anything without prior written permission.

Please read the Terms of Service and Privacy policy. Fragrantica® Inc, United States L. [1] Original native ranges of the ancestors of M. × paradisiaca: M. acuminata is shown in green and M. balbisiana in orange. [2] Musa × paradisiaca is the accepted name for the hybrid between Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana. Most cultivated bananas and plantains are triploid cultivars either of this hybrid or of M.

acuminata alone. Linnaeus originally used the name M. paradisiaca only for plantains or cooking bananas, but the modern usage includes hybrid cultivars used both for cooking and as dessert bananas.

musa paradisiaca

Linnaeus's name for dessert bananas, Musa sapientum, is thus a synonym of Musa × paradisiaca. Description [ edit ] Main articles: Banana and Cooking plantain Almost all cultivated plantains and many cultivated bananas are triploid cultivars of M. × paradisiaca. It is believed that Southeast Asian farmers first domesticated M. acuminata. When the cultivated plants spread north-west into areas where M. balbisiana was native (see map), hybrids between the two species occurred and were then developed further into a wide range of cultivars.

[3] Hundreds of cultivars of M. × musa paradisiaca are known, possessing characteristics that are highly variable, but broadly intermediate between the ancestral species. They are typically 2–9 metres (7–30 ft) tall when mature. The above-ground part of the plant is a "false stem" or pseudostem, consisting of leaves and their fused bases.

Each pseudostem can produce a single flowering stem. After fruiting, the pseudostem dies, but offshoots may develop from the base of the plant. Cultivars of M. × paradisiaca are usually sterile, without seeds or viable pollen. [4] Taxonomy [ edit ] Main articles: Banana – Taxonomy and List of banana cultivars – Classification Banana plants were originally classified by Linnaeus into two species, which he called Musa paradisiaca for those used as cooking bananas ( plantains), and M.

sapientum for those used as dessert bananas. It was later discovered that both of his "species" were actually cultivated varieties of the hybrid between two wild species, M. acuminata and M. balbisiana, which is now called M. × paradisiaca L. [5] The circumscription of the modern taxon M.

× paradisiaca thus includes both the original M. paradisiaca and M. sapientum, the latter being reduced to a synonym of M. × paradisiaca. [1] In pre-Linnean times this banana was named ' Musa serapionis', for instance by Maria Sybilla Merian in her Metamorphosis insectorum Musa paradisiaca of 1705.

[6] At one time, to deal with the great diversity of cultivated bananas and plantains, botanists created many other names which are now regarded musa paradisiaca synonyms of M.

× paradisiaca, such as M. corniculata Lour., [5] used for a group of plantains with large fruit resembling the horns of a bull. Cultivated varieties are now given cultivar names, with the cultivars classified into groups and subgroups.

Thus M. × paradisiaca 'Horn' is a cultivar belonging to the AAB genome group, Plantain subgroup. [3] See List of banana cultivars for further information on the naming and classification of cultivars. References [ edit ] musa paradisiaca ^ a b "Musa x paradisiaca", World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kewretrieved 2013-01-14 • ^ de Langhe, Edmond & de Maret, Pierre (2004), "Tracking the banana: its significance in early agriculture", in Hather, Jon G.

(ed.), The Prehistory of Food: Appetites for Change, Routledge, p. 372, ISBN 978-0-203-20338-5 • ^ a b Ploetz, R.C.; Kepler, A.K.; Daniells, J. & Nelson, S.C. (2007), "Banana and Plantain: An Overview with Emphasis on Pacific Island Cultivars", in Elevitch, C.R.

(ed.), Species Profiles for Pacific Island Agroforestry (PDF), Hōlualoa, Hawai'i: Permanent Agriculture Resources (PAR)retrieved 2013-01-10 • ^ Nelson, S.C.; Ploetz, R.C. & Kepler, A.K. (2006), " Musa species (bananas and plantains)" (PDF), in Elevitch, C.R (ed.), Species Profiles for Pacific Island Agroforestry, Hōlualoa, Hawai'i: Permanent Agriculture Resources (PAR), archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-02-28retrieved 2013-01-10 • ^ a b Valmayor, Ramón V.; Jamaluddin, S.H.; Silayoi, B.; Kusumo, S.; Danh, L.D.; Pascua, O.C.

& Espino, R.R.C. (2000), Banana cultivar names and synonyms in Southeast Asia (PDF), Los Baños, Philippines: International Network for Musa paradisiaca of Banana and Plantain – Asia and the Pacific Office, ISBN 978-971-91751-2-4, archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-01-08retrieved 2013-01-08 • ^ Merian, Maria Sybilla (1705). Metamorphosis insectorum Surinamensium (in Dutch).

( plate 12). See also: Constantine, David (2008). "Musa serapionis". Musa: an annotated list of the species of Musa. Retrieved 2019-05-24. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Musa × paradisiaca. Wikispecies has information related to Musa × paradisiaca.

musa paradisiaca

• Wikidata: Q10757112 • Wikispecies: Musa × paradisiaca • AoFP: 1488 • APA: 5433 • APDB: 187095 • EoL: 1116069 • EPPO: MUBPA • FNA: 222000252 • FoC: 240001485 musa paradisiaca GBIF: 2762752 • GRIN: 70453 • iNaturalist: 170883 • IPNI: 797595-1 • IRMNG: 10208095 • ITIS: 42391 • MoBotPF: 282811 • PfaF: Musa x paradisiaca • Plant List: kew-254888 • PLANTS: MUPA3 • POWO: urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:797595-1 • Tropicos: 21500456 • WCSP: 254888 • WFO: wfo-0000474656 Edit links • This page was last edited on 22 April 2022, at 09:31 (UTC).

• Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License 3.0 ; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

musa paradisiaca

Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization. • Privacy policy • About Wikipedia • Disclaimers • Contact Wikipedia • Mobile view • Developers • Statistics • Cookie statement • •
Events • Calendar • Signature Events • Members' Events • Private Events & Rentals • Special Exhibitions Shop & Dine • Garden Gate Shop • Little Shop Around the Corner • MBG Press • Sassafras Cafe • Terrace Cafe • Cafe Flora Brunch Top Attractions • Climatron • Japanese Garden • Victorian District & Tower Grove House • Children's Garden • Linnean House • Tram Tours • Just for Kids Youth & Families • Parent & Child Programs • Scout Programs • Special Events • Summer Programs • Youth & Teen Programs • Just for Kids Adults • Classes, Tours musa paradisiaca Workshops • St.

Louis Master Gardener Program • Therapeutic Horticulture • Travel with the Garden • Volunteer Opportunities Students & Teachers • School Programs and Field Trips • Teen Programs • Teacher Professional Development • Educational Resources Our Garden • Gardens & Conservatories • Notable Plant Collections • Plant Records • What's in bloom • Behind the Scenes Your Garden • Help for the Home Gardener • Plant Finder • Sustainable Gardening Gardening in St.

Louis • Master Gardeners • Community Gardening • Classes • Plant Societies • Plastic Pot Recycling Culture Winter hardy to USDA Zones 9-11. For St. Louis, this can be an interesting ornamental plant with tropical flair, but it is not expected to produce fruit and will require considerable maintenance.

In St. Louis, plants will not survive winter outdoors, but may be grown musa paradisiaca in the ground (if dug in fall), in greenhouses, in containers (overwinter indoors) or as houseplants. Plants are best grown in organically rich, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun. Plants tolerate and often appreciate some part shade or light filtered sun in musa paradisiaca heat of the day. Best growth occurs with consistently moist soils that do not dry out.

Fertilize plants regularly during the growing season. Site plants in areas protected from strong winds which can severely damage the large leaves. For containers, use a well-drained potting soil mix. Keep container soils consistently moist but not wet. Outdoor plants must be overwintered indoors, either as houseplants or by forcing plants into dormancy. Options for overwintering include: (1) Bring container indoors in fall before first frost and place in a large sunny room for overwintering as a houseplant, with reduced water and fertilization; (2) If plant is too large to bring inside as a houseplant, cut foliage back to 6-8” in fall after first frost, and store container in a cool, dark, frost-free corner of the basement until spring, providing just a touch of moisture as needed in winter to prevent the soils from totally drying out; (3) If container is too heavy or too large to bring inside, remove plant from container in fall before first musa paradisiaca, wrap roots in plastic and store in a cool, dark, frost-free corner of the basement until spring.

When using this option, foliage may be trimmed back or left on the plant and allowed to brown up in the normal course; (4) If growing plants directly in the ground, dig, wrap roots, trim back the leaves and store as in option #3 above. Noteworthy Characteristics Musa × paradisiaca ( M. acuminata × M. balbisiana) is a sterile triploid that is cultivated in warm climates for its tasty yellow-skinned fruit (bananas).

It is commonly called edible banana or French plantain. Many cultivars are available in commerce, ranging in height from 7’ to 25’ tall. This is a large, fast-growing, suckering, herbaceous perennial that produces huge oblong to paddle-shaped leaves that grow to as much as 8’ long with leaf sheaths overlapping to help form a trunk-like pseudostem (false stem).

Yellow flowers with purple-red bracts appear in summer on mature plants, sometimes to be followed by edible yellow bananas. Younger plants often will not flower and fruit until the 2nd or 3rd year. Container plants cut close to the ground in fall each year may never flower. After flowering and fruiting, the pseudostem dies, but the roots push out new shoots (suckers) which form new pseudostems.

Genus name honors Antonia Musa, Roman physician of the 1st century B.C. Specific epithet means belonging to paradise. Uses Whether grown outdoors in the landscape or indoors as a houseplant, bananas (even dwarf cultivars) need lots of space. They are classic tropical foliage plants, which, if they fruit, produce attractive bunches of yellow bananas.

They may be grown as ornamental plants in cool areas where fruiting will not occur.

musa paradisiaca

In St. Louis, it is effective when grown as a garden centerpiece or for tropical flair. By Lukas Hochenleitter und Kompagnie, via Wikimedia Commons Musa paradisiaca is the first Linnean name given to a banana and is therefore technically the "type species" for the genus Musa 1.

The name was coined by Carl Linnaeus, the father of modern taxonomy, who borrowed the name for the genus from Georg Eberhard Rumphius 2. Linnaeus described the only banana he was familiar with: a specimen cultivated in George Clifford's glasshouse near Haarlem in the Netherlands and famous for being the first banana to flower in Europe.

In 1736 Linnaeus, named it Musa Cliffortiana, which is technically a 'pre-Linnean' name. He renamed it Musa paradisiaca, in reference to musa paradisiaca forbidden fruit of paradise 3and published it in the first edition of Species Plantarum, the 1753 publication that marks the boundary between Linnean and pre-Linnean names.

Most authorities (e.g. Kew's World Checlist of Selected Plant Families 4 ) give Musa paradisiaca, or Musa x paradisiaca, as an accepted name. The x was added to indicate that the banana Linnaeus described—eventually determined to be a Plantain cultivar—is a hybrid of the wild species Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana. All the Latin binomials that had been assigned to similar hybrids are now considered to be synonyms of Musa paradisiaca x paradisiaca, including Musa sapientum, which Linnaeus described in 1758.

Further contributing to the confusion, the Latin names Musa paradisiaca and Musa sapientum have respectively become associated with the English words plantain (when used, erroneously, to mean all types of cooking bananas) and banana (when used, erroneously, to mean all types of dessert bananas)a practice criticized by Ernest E.

Cheesman, a British botanist who advocated abandoning Latin binomials for edible bananas 5. In 1955, Norman Simmonds and Kenneth Shepherd put forward a scoring method based on morphological characters to classify edible bananas that has proved more useful to scientists than Latin binomials.

References Navigate the taxonomy of edible bananas on the cultivar diversity portal Banana cultivar checklist of local names and synonyms Contributors to this page: Anne Vézina. Page last modified on Tuesday, 21 May 2019 17:05:39 CEST by Anne Vézina.

The original document is available at https://www.promusa.org/Musa+paradisiaca
• Garden Design • Garden Styles • Landscaping Ideas • Garden Finder • Design Your Garden • Landscape Designers • Planting Ideas • Plant Combination Ideas musa paradisiaca Seasonal Garden Ideas • Hardy to Tropical Gardens • Regional Garden Ideas • Garden Solutions • Sunny to Shady Gardens • Growing Plants • Climate Zones • Gardening Tips • Plant Selection Guides • Plant Care • Flowers and Plants • by Plant Type • by Hardiness Zone • by Season of Interest • by Solution • by Planting Place • by Garden Types • by Region • by Native Plants • Plant Finder • Create Account • Create Your Garden • Become a Merchant • Become a Designer • Login • Musa x paradisiaca (Edible Banana) is a large, fast-growing, suckering evergreen perennial boasting huge, paddle-shaped, deep green leaves, up to 8 ft.

long (240 cm). Drooping spikes of yellow flowers adorned with showy purple-red bracts appear seasonally on mature plants (2-3 years old). They are sometimes followed by edible, tasty yellow bananas. The musa paradisiaca fruits are sweet, juicy and full of seeds and the peel is thicker than other bananas.

The leaf sheathes overlap to form a trunk-like pseudostem. Each pseudostem has a limited lifespan. It only lives as long as it takes it to flower and produce fruit. After flowering and fruiting, the pseudostem dies, but the roots push out new shoots (banana pups) which form new pseudostems. • Grows up to 7-25 ft. tall (210-750 cm) and 6-10 ft. wide (180-300 cm). • Performs best in full sun in humus-rich, well-drained soils.

Best growth occurs with consistently moist soils that do not dry out. Banana trees musa paradisiaca not do well in drought conditions since they need to be watered often for proper growth. Shelter from the wind to prevent the leaves from being damaged. Fertilize plants regularly during the growing season. • Great choice for containers or Mediterranean gardens where it will proudly stand out. • Disease free. Keep an eye out for glasshouse red spider mite, mealybugs and aphids. Not sure which Musa - Bananas to pick?

Compare All Musa - Bananas Buy Musa x paradisiaca (Edible Banana) Add to Collection Add to Any Collection My Collection Requirements Hardiness 9 – 11 What's My Zone? Climate Zones 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, H1, H2 Plant Type Fruit, Perennials Plant Family Musa - Bananas Exposure Full Sun Season of Interest Spring (Early,Mid,Late) Summer (Early,Mid,Late) Fall Winter Height 7' – 25' (210cm – 7.5m) Spread 6' – 10' (180cm – 3m) Spacing 72" – 120" (180cm – 300cm) Water Needs Average Maintenance High Soil Type Chalk, Clay, Loam, Sand Soil pH Acid, Alkaline, Neutral Soil Drainage Moist but Well-Drained, Well-Drained Characteristics Musa paradisiaca, Evergreen, Fruit & Berries Garden Uses Patio and Containers Garden Styles Mediterranean Garden Add to Collection Add to Any Collection My Collection Buy Plants Requirements Hardiness 9 – 11 What's My Zone?

Climate Zones 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, H1, H2 Plant Type Fruit, Perennials Plant Family Musa - Bananas Exposure Full Sun Season of Interest Spring (Early,Mid,Late) Summer (Early,Mid,Late) Fall Winter Height 7' – 25' (210cm – 7.5m) Spread 6' – 10' (180cm – 3m) Spacing 72" – 120" (180cm – 300cm) Water Needs Average Maintenance High Soil Type Chalk, Clay, Loam, Sand Soil pH Acid, Alkaline, Neutral Soil Drainage Moist but Well-Drained, Well-Drained Characteristics Showy, Evergreen, Fruit & Berries Garden Uses Patio and Containers Garden Styles Mediterranean Garden Join Gardenia.net Create a membership account to save your garden designs and to view them on any device.

Becoming a contributing member of Gardenia is easy and can be done in just a few minutes. If you provide us with your name, email address and the payment of a modest $25 annual membership fee, you will become a full member, enabling musa paradisiaca to design and save up to 25 of your garden design ideas. Join now and start creating your dream garden!
Phonetic Spelling MEW-suh par-uh-DIS-ee-uh-ka Description A hybrid between M.

acuminata and M. balbisiana. While this species does include some dessert bananas, it mostly contains cultivars of starchy cooking bananas and plantains.

See this plant in the following landscape: Cultivars / Varieties: Tags: #edible plant #showy fruits #tropical perennials #herbaceous perennials #hybrids #edible fruits #non-toxic for horses #non-toxic for dogs #non-toxic for cats #tropical • Attributes: Genus: Musa Species: x paradisiaca Family: Musaceae Life Cycle: Perennial Country Or Region Of Origin: Malesia • Whole Plant Traits: Plant Type: Edible Herbaceous Perennial • Cultural Conditions: Light: Full sun (6 or more musa paradisiaca of direct sunlight a day) USDA Plant Hardiness Zone: 10b, 10a, 11b, 11a • Fruit: Fruit Color: Black Brown/Copper Gold/Yellow Green Fruit Value To Gardener: Edible Fruit Type: Berry Fruit Length: > 3 inches Fruit Width: 1-3 inches Fruit Description: An musa paradisiaca fruit with a thick peel.

Tends to be starchier than more commonly known bananas. • Leaves: Hairs Present: No • Stem: Stem Is Aromatic: No NC State University and N.C.

A&T State University work in tandem, along with federal, state and local governments, to form a strategic partnership called N.C. Cooperative Extension, which staffs local offices in all 100 counties and with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

Read our Commitment to Diversity - Read our Privacy Statement N.C. Cooperative Extension prohibits discrimination and harassment on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, sex (including pregnancy), disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, and veteran status.Etsy uses cookies and similar technologies to give you a better experience, enabling things like: • basic site functions • ensuring secure, safe transactions • secure account login • remembering account, browser, and regional preferences • remembering privacy and security settings • analysing site traffic and usage • personalized search, content, and recommendations • helping sellers understand their audience • showing relevant, targeted ads on and off Etsy Detailed information can musa paradisiaca found in Musa paradisiaca Cookies & Similar Technologies Policy and our Privacy Policy.

Required Cookies & Technologies Some of the technologies we use are necessary musa paradisiaca critical functions like security and site integrity, account authentication, security musa paradisiaca privacy preferences, internal site usage and maintenance data, and to make the site work correctly for browsing and transactions.

Personalized Advertising These are third party technologies used for things like interest based Etsy ads. We do this with marketing and advertising partners (who may have their own information they’ve collected). Saying no will not stop you from seeing Etsy ads or impact Etsy's own personalization technologies, but it may make the ads you see less relevant or more repetitive. Find out more in our Cookies & Similar Technologies Policy.
Karkandela × malabarica Raf.

Musa × acutibracteata M.Hotta, Musa × alphurica Miq. Musa × aphurica Rumph. ex Sagot Musa × arakanensis F.W.Ripley ex Blechynden Musa × bacoba Musa paradisiaca. Musa × berteroi Colla. Musa × bidigitalis De Wild. Musa × champa Baker Musa × chapara Perr. Musa × chiliocarpa Backer ex K.Heyne Musa × consociata Nakai Musa × corbieri A.Chev. Musa × corniculata Lour. Musa × dacca Horan.

musa paradisiaca

Musa × decrescens De Briey ex De Wild. Musa × discolor Horan. Musa × dulcissima Nakai Musa × emasculata De Briey ex De Wild. Musa × humilis Perr. Musa × ingrata Nakai Musa × jaheri Nakai Musa × maculata Jacq.

Musa × megalocarpa Nakai Musa × mensaria Moench Musa musa paradisiaca mirabilis Nakai Musa × nigra Perr Musa × odorata Lour. Musa × oleracea Vieill. Musa × pallida Nakai Musa paradisiaca × polycarpa Nakai Musa × prematura Nakai Musa × protractorachis De Wild.

Musa × purpureotomentosa De Wild. Musa × sapidisiaca K.C.Jacob Musa × sapientum L. Musa × trichocarpa Nakai Musa × vittata W.Ackm. ex Rodigas Common Name: Banana Title Hawaiian Ethnobotany Online Database Publication Author Website http://www2.bishopmuseum.org/ethnobotanydb/index.asp Publisher Year 0 ISBN Description Brief details on over 100 species of Hawaiian plants.]. Looking somewhat like a tree, it is a herbaceous plant whose top growth dies after flowering, to be replaced by new growth from the rootstock.

musa paradisiaca

Bananas are a musa paradisiaca food and one of the most prolific of all food crops, producing more than cassava, and several times as much as wheat and potatoes[ Title Dominica Botanic Gardens Publication Author Website http://www.da-academy.org/trees_shrubs.html Publisher Year 0 ISBN Description An on-line resource, providing top quality pictures and some basic information on various plants being grown at the Botanic Gardens, often including uses and habitat.].

They are one of the most commonly cultivated food crops in tropical and some subtropical regions of the world. The plant also has a range of medicinal and other uses.

musa paradisiaca

Known HazardsNone known Botanical References Title The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. Publication Author Huxley. A. Publisher MacMillan Press Year 1992 ISBN 0-333-47494-5 Description Excellent and very comprehensive, though it contains a number of silly mistakes. Readable yet also very detailed. RangeOnly known as a cultivated plant, it is a hybrid of M.

Acuminata × M. Balbisiana. HabitatNot known Properties Edibility Rating Medicinal Rating Other Uses Rating Habit Perennial Height 8.00 m Growth Rate Fast Cultivation Status Cultivated Cultivation DetailsThe optimal temperature for fruit production is about 27°c, and night time temperatures should not fall much below 18°c when the fruit is ripening or flavour can be impaired[ Title The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening.

1992. Publication Author Huxley. A. Publisher MacMillan Press Year 1992 ISBN 0-333-47494-5 Description Excellent and very comprehensive, though it contains a number of silly mistakes.

Readable yet also very detailed.]. Requires a sunny sheltered position in a well-drained fertile soil with a pH between 6 and 7.5[ Title The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. Publication Author Musa paradisiaca.

A. Publisher MacMillan Press Year 1992 ISBN 0-333-47494-5 Description Excellent and very comprehensive, though it contains a number of silly mistakes. Readable yet also very detailed.]. There are very many named varieties, but two main types can be distinguished:- Dessert bananas which become very sweet when fully ripe.

Plantains, which contain more carbohydrate and are more commonly cooked. Edible UsesFruit - raw or cooked. Dessert forms are sweet and succulent when fully ripe and are widely eaten out of hand, though they are musa paradisiaca versatile and are used in musa paradisiaca wide variety of other ways. For example, they are commonly used with other juicier fruits to make smoothies, they can be baked, cooked in cakes, dried for later use etc. Plantains are richer in starch and contain less sugars.

Whilst these are more commonly cooked as a vegetable, when fully ripe they make a very acceptable raw fruit[ Title Cornucopia II Publication Author Facciola. S. Publisher Kampong Publications, California. Year 1998 ISBN 0-9628087-2-5 Description The second edition of an excellent guide to the edible uses of plants, though it does not give any details of cultivation etc.]. The inner stem can be boiled and eaten, or can be dried and made into a flour and starch[ Title Cornucopia II Publication Author Facciola.

S. Publisher Kampong Publications, California. Year 1998 ISBN 0-9628087-2-5 Description The second edition of an excellent guide to the edible uses of plants, though it does not give any details of cultivation etc.]. Blanched shoots that musa paradisiaca from the base can be roasted and eaten[ Title Cornucopia II Publication Author Facciola. S. Publisher Kampong Publications, California. Year 1998 ISBN 0-9628087-2-5 Description The second edition of an excellent guide to the edible uses of plants, though it does not give any details of cultivation etc.].

The leaves are commonly used for wrapping foods that are to be cooked - especially glutinous rice dishes. They impart a distinctive flavour and a greenish colour[ Title Cornucopia II Publication Author Facciola. S. Publisher Kampong Publications, California. Year 1998 ISBN 0-9628087-2-5 Description The second edition of an excellent guide to the edible uses of plants, though it does not give any details of cultivation etc.].

The ashes of the plant can be used as a salt substitute[ Title Cornucopia II Publication Author Facciola. S. Publisher Kampong Publications, California. Year 1998 ISBN 0-9628087-2-5 Description The second edition of an excellent guide to the edible uses of plants, though it does not give any details of cultivation etc.]. MedicinalThe unripe fruits and their sap are astringent and haemostatic[ Musa paradisiaca Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R.

A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting illustration. An excellent, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses of the plants of the region].

They are eaten, often roasted, as a treatment for musa paradisiaca Title Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R. A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting illustration.

Musa paradisiaca excellent, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses of the plants of the region]. The fruit is used to treat epilepsy[ Title Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R.

A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting musa paradisiaca. An excellent, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses of the plants of the region].

musa paradisiaca

The peeled and sliced fruit is placed on the forehead to relieve the heat of a headache[ Title Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R. A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting illustration. An excellent, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses of the plants of the region]. The peel of the fruit is considered an abortive[ Title Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R.

A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting illustration. An excellent, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses musa paradisiaca the plants of the region].

The leaves, dried and made into a syrup, are used to treat coughs and chest conditions such as bronchitis[ Title The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Publication Author Chevallier. A. Publisher Dorling Kindersley.

London Year 1996 ISBN 9-780751-303148 Description An excellent guide to over 500 of the more well known medicinal herbs musa paradisiaca around the world.]. An infusion of the banana leaf, combined with sugarcane roots, is used to hasten childbirth[ Title Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R.

A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting illustration. An excellent, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses of the plants of the region].

The leaves are applied as a vesicant on blistering[ Title Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R. A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting illustration.

An excellent, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses of the plants of the region]. It is tied onto the forehead to relieve a headache[ Title Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R. A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting illustration.

An excellent, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses of the plants of the region]. The pulp of the trunk is made into an infusion to soothe dysentery[ Title Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R. A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting illustration.

An excellent, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses of the plants of the region]. A liquid collected at a cut stem is an antiseptic that is applied musa paradisiaca furuncles and wounds[ Title Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R.

A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting illustration. An excellent, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses of the plants of the region].

The root is strongly astringent and has been used to arrest the coughing up of blood[ Title The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Publication Author Chevallier. A. Publisher Dorling Kindersley. London Year 1996 ISBN 9-780751-303148 Description An excellent guide to over 500 of the more well known medicinal herbs from around the world.]. Applied externally, the juice of the root is used to treat carbuncles and swellings[ Title Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R.

A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting illustration. An excellent, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses of the plants of the region]. The flowers are astringent[ Title Plants and People of Nepal Publication Author Manandhar. N. P. Publisher Timber Press.

Oregon. Year 2002 ISBN 0-88192-527-6 Description Excellent book, covering over 1,500 species of useful plants from Nepal together with information on the geography and peoples of Nepal. Good descriptions of the plants with terse notes on their uses.]. The fruit contains two vasoconstrictors: norepinephrine (a chemical used to raise blood pressure) and dopamine.

Norepinephrine is good for a weak heart[ Title Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R. A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting illustration. An excellent, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses of the plants of the region]. The fruit is also rich in vitamin A[ Musa paradisiaca Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R.

A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting illustration. An musa paradisiaca, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses of the plants of the region]. Sap of the fruit contains serothine, which has an action on the long muscles[ Title Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R.

A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting illustration. An excellent, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses of the plants of the region].

Other UsesThe large leaves are used as plates for eating food[ Title Plants and People of Nepal Publication Author Manandhar.

N. P. Publisher Timber Press. Oregon. Year 2002 ISBN 0-88192-527-6 Description Excellent book, covering over 1,500 species of useful plants from Nepal together with information on the geography and peoples of Nepal. Good descriptions of the plants with terse notes on their uses.]. The leaf sheath is used as a temporary binding[ Title Plants and People of Nepal Publication Author Manandhar. N. P. Publisher Musa paradisiaca Press. Oregon. Year 2002 ISBN 0-88192-527-6 Description Excellent book, covering over 1,500 species of useful plants from Nepal together with information on the geography and peoples of Nepal.

Good descriptions of the plants with terse notes on their uses.].

musa paradisiaca

The juice of the roots is used as a hair tonic[ Title Medicinal Plants of the Guianas Publication Author DeFilipps, R. A.; Maina, S. L.; & Crepin, J. Website http://botany.si.edu/bdg/medicinal/index.html Publisher Smithsonian Museum Year 0 ISBN Description A down-loadable PDF document of a book in pre-publication awaiting illustration. An excellent, if rather terse, guide to the traditional medicinal uses of the musa paradisiaca of the region]. PropagationSeed - sow the large seed in individual pots in the spring in a warm greenhouse at about 20°c[ Title The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening.

1992. Publication Author Huxley. A. Publisher MacMillan Press Year 1992 ISBN 0-333-47494-5 Description Excellent and very comprehensive, though it contains a number of silly mistakes. Readable yet also very detailed.]. Grow the seedlings on in a rich soil, giving occasional liquid feeds. Keep the plants in the greenhouse for at least three years before trying them outdoors.

Division of musa paradisiaca in late spring. Dig up the suckers with care, trying to cause the least disturbance to the main plant. Pot them up and grow them on in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse until they are well established.

Botanical description of Musa paradisiaca/Musaceae/in tamil




2022 www.videocon.com