South korea olympic games tokyo 2020

south korea olympic games tokyo 2020

Sport and Solidarity The Tokyo 2020 Games were an unprecedented demonstration of unity and solidarity as the world came together for the first time following the onset of the South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 pandemic for an Olympic Games focused on the pure essentials: a celebration of athletes and sport. This sense of solidarity was south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 to the success of the Tokyo 2020 Games following their historic one-year postponement, especially in the establishment of the Tokyo 2020 Playbooks—guidelines for safe and secure participation and operations.

The Playbooks set a new standard for large-scale sporting events and ensured that everyone from athletes to the media would be able to safely take part in the Games. Youthful, Urban, and Gender-Equal The Tokyo 2020 Games showcased the evolution of the Olympic programme, introducing new sports and events that strengthened the timeless appeal of the Olympic Games for a new generation. Tokyo 2020's 339 events in 33 sports—the most in Olympic history—included the Olympic debut of sports such as skateboarding, sport climbing, surfing and karate, as well as events such as BMX freestyle and 3x3 basketball.

The expansion of the programme also included an increase in gender-equal competition opportunities. The Tokyo 2020 Games were the most gender-balanced in history, with a nearly 50/50 ratio of male and female athletes. Sustainable Operations and Legacy Almost 60% of Tokyo 2020 venues utilised existing facilities—including six legacy venues from the Olympic Games Tokyo 1964.

Tokyo 2020's Toward Zero Carbon push resulted not only in reduced emissions but also in offsets that more than equaled the emissions produced, driving the Games beyond carbon neutrality.

Tokyo 2020 also pioneered innovative projects to include the Japanese public in concrete sustainability actions. The approximately 5,000 medals cast for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games were created from 100% recycled metals sourced from small electronic devices donated by the Japanese public.

Meanwhile, the Victory Ceremony podiums were created from post-consumer plastic—once again donated by the Japanese public—and recycled marine plastic waste. Replay Men's Individual All-Around Final - Artistic Gymn. Tokyo 2020 - Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 Discover the Games The Brand A visual identity is developed for each edition of the Olympic Games. Brand The Medals Beginning as an olive wreath, medal designs have evolved over the years. Medals The Mascot An original image, it must give concrete form to the Olympic spirit.

Mascot The Torch An iconic part of any Olympic Games, each host offers their unique version. Torch Goesan, South Korea: Bungee-jumping, baseball stadiums and a major car company: the recipe for South Korea's extraordinary dominance of Olympic archery is unorthodox but pointedly effective.

South Korean archers have ruled the sport for decades, winning 23 out of the 34 Olympic gold medals awarded since 1984, including all four golds at the last Games in Rio five years ago. The women have won all eight team titles since that discipline was added on home turf in Seoul in 1988, with the men taking five out of eight. Theories abound as to why South Koreans are so good at archery, including vague mumblings about their "sensitive fingers" - a real or imagined physical trait also cited when discussing the nation's dominance in women's golf.

south korea olympic games tokyo 2020

Archery is unusually lucrative in the country, with businesses and local governments owning more than 30 teams in competitive leagues and paying their members' salaries - there are more than 140 professionals according to the Korea Archery Association (KAA).

And the Olympic selection process is both gruelling and ruthless: the three top male and female archers in multiple trials over several months get the slots, with no south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 given for previous victories, records, or standings.

"There is a saying that if you finish first in South Korea, you can win gold at the Olympics," said Kim Hyung-tak, who coached the national team for the 1984 Games in Los Angeles, where they won their first gold. Even top stars can be cast aside in the relentless pursuit of gold.

Among those representing Korea in Tokyo will be a teenager and three women archers with no Olympic experience, while reigning Olympic champions Ku Bon-chan and Chang Hye-jin both failed to make the team.

"It's not that they've lost their skill," explained KAA vice-chairman Jang Young-sool. "It just means that South Korea has many skilled archers." In the 1970s, as tension mounted on the Korean peninsula, South Korea's then-military government encouraged boys to train in taekwondo and girls to learn archery.

Coach Kim trained dozens of teachers from schools across the nation so they could instruct their pupils. Archery had little funding and poor facilities, Kim told AFP, with competitions being held in drained swimming pools and results to match, despite a centuries-long tradition in the sport.

Ahead of the Seoul Games, dictator Chun Doo-hwan ordered the country's major businesses to sponsor national sports federations to try to ensure a respectable performance. Carmaker-to-shipbuilder Hyundai Group were allocated archery, with the son of their founder becoming KAA chairman. It has reportedly pumped at least $40 million into the sport over the past three decades.

Top researchers from Hyundai have carried out scientific studies to improve archers' performances, and Jang says the firm's long-term backing has been "essential".

The current Hyundai Motor chairman Euisun Chung has been head of the KAA since 2005. Jang credits him with the team's success in Rio after he provided a customised bus equipped with beds, yoga mats and showers to ensure the athletes were well-rested.

He even provided bullet-proof cars for their safety. Chung was the first person that Ku Bon-chan ran to after winning the individual men's gold and the team showed their appreciation by tossing the Hyundai executive into the air.

The team has adopted unique training methods, ranging from bungee jumping to control nerves to practising at a full baseball stadium to handle the noise of large crowds. Ahead of London 2012, they studied the British capital's rain and wind patterns and scoured South Korea for a training location with similar weather, finally picking Namhae on the often damp southern coast. "The weather was actually terrible for the final match," said Jang, who was the head coach at the time.

"The Chinese team were flustered while our archers competed calmly and ended up winning by a single point." This year the team has practised at a replica of the arena in Tokyo, reproducing even the sounds the archers are expected to hear, from chirping birds to Japanese and English announcements.

They have taken into account the possibility of the competitions taking place with no fans because of the coronavirus pandemic, with stand-in television crews simulating the camera noises heard in empty south korea olympic games tokyo 2020. First-time Olympian Kang Chae-young, 25, said Tokyo will be "much more familiar" as a result. "I hope to be able to show my skills and do my best without any regrets," she told AFP. The pressure on the archers to keep up the run of success can be immense, according to former coach Kim.

"We are like a tiger trying not to be bitten by a mob of ruthless rabbits," he said, adding the current team's chances were good. "These are the archers that beat the previous Olympic champions. And that says it all." Updated Date: July 07, 2021 12:34:51 IST Sports Swimmer Sajan Prakash ready to take bigger strides after 'breakthrough' moment Prakash made history by becoming the first Indian to breach the Games ‘A’ standard time, achieving the feat at the Sette Colli Trophy in Rome in 2021.

Srihari Nataraj followed him soon after, achieving the ‘A’ qualifying time at the same event. • India logs 3,207 new COVID-19 cases, 29 deaths in last 24 hours; positivity rate at 0.95% India currently has 20,403 active cases of COVID-19. There has been a decrease of 232 cases in the active COVID-19 caseload in a span of 24 hours. The active cases comprise 0.05 per cent of the total coronavirus cases in the country • Spine-chilling video of leopard attacking forest officials in Panipat goes viral The clip, shared by Panipat Superintendent of Police, Shashank Kumar Sawan on Twitter, shows the leopard using its claws to attack the officers • Odisha: 64 school students residing in 2 hostels in Rayagada district test COVID-19 positive After 64 students of Odisha’s Rayagada district tested COVID-19 positive, authorities have ordered districts to conduct health screening of all boarders in the state • Amit Shah on 3-day Assam visit, to interact with BSF officials at Mankachar border outpost today Union Home Minister will lay the foundation and take part in the groundbreaking ceremony for CENWOSTO-II (Central Workshop and Stores) for Central Armed Paramilitary Force (CAPF) at Kelenchi in Tamulpur district • Watch video: Ukrainian artillery in action in the Mykolayiv region Russia-Ukraine war: Ukrainian forces retaliate as Russian missiles strike Mykolaiv, occupying government buildings in Kherson South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 /> Kangmin Kim of Republic of Korea (silver), Georgii Popov of Russian Federation (gold), Mahamadou Maharana Amadou T of Niger (bronze) and Zaid Mustafa Mahmoud Abdul Kareem of Jordan (bronze) stand on the podium after the Taekwondo - Men’s 48-55kg on Day 2 of the Buenos Aires 2018 Youth Olympic Games at the Oceania Pavilion, Youth Olympic Park on October 8, 2018 in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Regions • Central Asia • East Asia • Oceania • South Asia • Southeast Asia Topics • Diplomacy • Economy • Environment • Opinion • Politics • Security • Society Blogs • ASEAN Beat • Asia Defense • China Power • Crossroads Asia • Flashpoints • Oceania • Pacific Money • The Debate • The Koreas • The Pulse • Tokyo Report • Trans-Pacific View More • Features • Interviews • Photo Essays • Podcasts • Videos Magazine South Korea has already racked up 12 medals, including four golds, in Tokyo as the summer games wrap up their first week.

Of those four golds, three are for archery, where South Korean teams have dominated for decades — in fact, the women’s archery team gold has never gone to any other country since the event was introduced at the Games in 1988. The other gold came from men’s team sabre, and South Korea has picked up silver and bronze medals in other fencing events as well as judo and taekwondo. Unlike in the United States where plummeting viewership numbers south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 been making headlines, it seems like Koreans are still steadily tuning in to watch the games, especially during marquee sports like soccer and events featuring top Korean athletes.

The opening ceremonies on July 23 racked up 17.2 percent ratings across the three major broadcasters, although even the most-watched broadcast of the ceremonies on KBS was only the third highest rated show for the day.

Outside of the arenas, news has focused almost entirely on the evolving COVID-19 situation both in Tokyo and around the world, and how the pandemic has deeply affected the Games even now, a year after they were originally scheduled. But beyond the pandemic, there have been some small political developments tied to the Tokyo Olympics as well.

Around a dozen high-level foreign dignitaries will travel to Japan to attend the games in some capacity, including U.S. First Lady Jill Biden and French President Emmanuel Macron. However, South Korean President Moon Jae-in will not be among them. Diplomat Brief Weekly Newsletter N Get briefed on the story of the week, and developing stories to watch across the Asia-Pacific. Get the Newsletter Earlier this summer, it was reported that Seoul and Tokyo were in discussions to hold a summit meeting between their two leaders south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 the Olympics, which would be a first since Prime Minister Suga Yoshihide took office in September.

However, talks fell through after the two sides reportedly failed to reach an agreement on a productive agenda for a meeting. Enjoying this article? South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 here to subscribe for full access. Just $5 a month. Although it was not the official reason for Moon’s decision to sit out the visit, lewd comments made by the deputy chief of mission at Japan’s embassy in Seoul, in which he implied that Moon’s efforts to bridge relations between the countries were one-sided, certainly didn’t help.

In fact, possibly in part because of the fallout from those comments, the Korean public widely supported Moon’s decision to forego a visit to Tokyo for now, with 65 percent in favor according to recent polling. That doesn’t mean that there have been no productive diplomatic meetings in Tokyo, however. Last week, ahead of the opening of the Games, senior officials from the United States, South South korea olympic games tokyo 2020, and Japan sat down for a trilateral meeting focused in particular on security issues in the region, including working together to re-start discussions with North Korea over their nuclear program.

However, the latest news that inter-Korean communications are back up and running, plus the rocky road South Korea-Japan relations still seem to be on, may mean that focus on mending the bilateral relationship is on the back burner for now. Regions • Central Asia • East Asia • Oceania • South Asia • Southeast Asia Topics • Diplomacy • Economy • Environment • Opinion • Politics • Security • Society Blogs • ASEAN Beat • Asia Defense • China Power • Crossroads Asia • Flashpoints • Oceania • Pacific Money • The Debate • The Koreas • The Pulse • Tokyo Report • Trans-Pacific View More • Features • Interviews • Photo Essays • Podcasts • Videos Archives • A New Japan • By Other Means • APAC Insider • Asia Life • Asia Scope • China, What's Next?

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• Made in Germany • Reporter • REV • Shift • Sports Life • The Day • The 77 Percent • Tomorrow Today • To the Point • World Stories • RADIO • LEARN GERMAN Hopes that Japan and South Korea might finally be able to build new bridges through a summit of their leaders on the sidelines of the Tokyo Olympic Games have been dashed after Seoul announced that President Moon Jae-in would not be going to the opening ceremony on Friday.

The northeast Asian neighbors have long been at loggerheads over differing interpretations of their shared history, most notably during Japan's colonial rule of the Korean peninsula from 1910 through 1945, but bilateral ties have worsened since Moon became president in 2017. A series of legal claims by former forced laborers and "comfort women" — the euphemistic term for women forced into sexual slavery for the Imperial Japanese south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 during the occupation — has deepened the already entrenched nationalist factions on both sides of the divide, leaving no room for compromise.

That deepening chasm has caused alarm in Washington, which traditionally sees Japan and South Korea as its two most important security allies in the region. Since coming to power in January, US President Joe Biden has put pressure on both Moon and the administration of Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga to put their differences aside in order to present a united front to the challenges posed by an increasingly belligerent China and an unpredictable and nuclear-armed North Korea.

Tepid response from Japan South Korea had, in recent weeks, indicated that Moon would be willing to travel to Tokyo if his Japanese counterpart would agree to a summit during which issues of substance might be addressed and solutions reached. Japan's reaction, however, was lukewarm. "The Biden administration has struggled to get Seoul and Tokyo to prioritize shared geopolitical concerns," Leif-Eric Easley, a professor of international studies at Ewha Woman's University in Seoul, told DW.

"The Olympics should have been a reconciliatory action-forcing event for the feuding US allies. Instead, South Korea-Japan relations have worsened because of a sequencing problem." Can the Tokyo Olympics boost LGBTQ rights?

"The Moon administration wanted a summit to disentangle historic issues from contemporary trade and security cooperation," Easley said. "But the Suga government expected South Korea to first address its domestic court cases over wartime compensation so the legal foundation of bilateral exchanges could be restored." South Korean court cases over compensation for historical wrongs are a "line in the sand" for Suga, who has attempted to put the burden of a solution entirely onto Seoul, the professor explained.

"This mismatch produced a series of diplomatic insults and failure to arrange a Moon-Suga summit during the Tokyo Olympics," he said. Lewd remark the final straw The final straw for Seoul, however, appears to have been a deeply undiplomatic comment from the deputy head of the Japanese embassy in Seoul.

During a lunch meeting with a South Korean reporter last week, Hirohisa Soma said Moon's efforts to improve relations with Tokyo while Japan attempted to successfully host the Olympics and deal with the pandemic amounted to "masturbation." Seoul lodged an official protest, and the Japanese government has confirmed that it will replace Soma for his comments.

The damage was done, however, and the South Korean Blue House announced on Monday that Moon would not be going to Tokyo, with a government spokesman confirming that Soma's comments had been a "significant obstacle" to the diplomatic move. Korean media has been strongly critical of Japan's perceived indifference to Seoul's olive branch, with the JoongAng Daily accusing Tokyo of "high-handedness" and creating a "negative environment." Tokyo Pavilion: Olympics inspire outdoors exhibition Tokyo Castle, Makoto Aida By creating two castles, which are seen as traditional symbols of strength and power, using cardboard and blue sheets, Makoto Aida questions the notion south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 permanence: "These reliable materials are robust but they also symbolize something temporary, which we often see in regions that have been affected by natural disasters in Japan," the artist says, stressing the need to withstand challenges.

• Tokyo Pavilion: Olympics inspire outdoors exhibition Tea House "Go-an," Terunobu Fujimori "A tea house requires height; it brings a new perspective on the world. Once you climb up and enter through the narrow and dark entrance, you see a completely different scenery.

This effect is unique to tea houses," says artist Terunobu Fujimrori, who is fascinated by the thoughts that go into building tea houses, which are a central part of traditional Japanese architecture.

• Tokyo Pavilion: Olympics inspire outdoors exhibition Tea House "Go-an," Terunobu Fujimori On its first floor, the tea house opens to a view of the National Stadium designed by architect Kengo Kuma. The contrast between the traditional space reserved for tea ceremonies and the 21st century design of the stadium highlight the opposites that are central to contemporary Japanese culture: Can they coexist, as pandemics, natural disasters and changing social dynamics challenge tradition?

• Tokyo Pavilion: Olympics inspire outdoors exhibition The Obliteration Room, Yayoi Kusama The theme of tea ceremonies continues at The Obliteration Room by artist Yayoi Kusama.

But here, the focuses is on the aspect of (self)-destruction that is innate to repetitive rituals. This white room will soon disappear, as visitors will cover it with polka dots stickers in order to "obliterate" it. As the dots increase, everything disappears into them and "absorbed into something timeless." • Tokyo Pavilion: Olympics inspire outdoors exhibition Super Wall Art Tokyo, Tadanori Yokoo & Mimi Yokoo This large-scale mural covering the glass wall of Marunouchi Building and New Marunouchi Building forms a pair of huge canvasses created by artists Tadanori Yokoo and Mimi Yokoo.

It depicts the energy of two elements: water and fire: "This project contains the desire to transmit this energy, this big swell of universal life forms, from Tokyo to the world and the future," the artists explain. • Tokyo Pavilion: Olympics inspire outdoors exhibition Street Garden Theater, Teppei Fujiwara Teppei Fujiwara created a "theater for plants and people," designed to act as an "urban forest" with a complex interplay of woodwork and plants.

The Pavilion evokes a tradition that has been passed down from generation to generation since the Edo period, when people started to put plants pots in front of their houses.

This legacy south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 continues in Tokyo today, creating spaces for people to rest. Author: Aimie Eliot 'Face history squarely' In an editorial, The Korea Times demanded that Japan "face up to its history squarely and make sincere efforts to build trust with Korea." Media in Japan have reported that Moon has canceled his trip, but are far more focused on the Olympics and rising coronavirus numbers.

Those two issues are also likely to be the government's primary concerns just days before the opening ceremony. "Suga is desperate for the games to be a success, both because Japan is the host nation and as he is facing an election before the end of the year and will be hoping for a positive response at the polls if everything goes off smoothly," said Hiromi Murakami, a professor of political science at the Tokyo campus of Temple University.

"For Japan, the absolute priorities are closer to home than the disagreements with South Korea, for which he is unlikely to win any public support, especially if he is seen to be giving in to pressure from Seoul," she said. Suga is also acutely aware that Moon's administration will come to an end next spring, Murakami said.

"A lot of people in Japan are just waiting for a government that they feel it is difficult to work with to leave office in the hope that they are better able to negotiate with whoever comes in next," he added.

South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 patience Easley agrees that Japan is exercising strategic patience in the anticipation that bilateral relations might cool down and experience a new start next year.

"Moon seeks a compromise with Japan but hasn't made much progress on the domestic politics of the issue, so Tokyo may wait until after elections in Japan and South Korea to deal with Moon's successor," he said. South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 the outlook is not entirely bleak, he added, as the two governments are still clearly talking about issues of shared concern.

"South Korea-Japan ties are severely strained but not irreparably damaged," he emphasized. "Much cooperation continues, including frequent trilateral meetings with the United States to coordinate foreign policies." On Tuesday, Tokyo and Seoul agreed to continue efforts to resolve the issues that have caused the rift.

Senior diplomats from the two nations also met in Tokyo on Wednesday with their US counterpart to discuss regional and global matters. • TOP STORIES • Coronavirus • World • Germany • Business • Science • Environment • Culture • Sports • • A - Z Index • MEDIA CENTER • Live TV • All media content • Latest Programs • Podcasts • TV • Schedule and Reception • TV Programs • • RADIO • LEARN GERMAN • German Courses • German XXL • Community D • Teaching German • ABOUT DW • Who we are • Press • GMF • Business & Sales • Advertising • Travel • SERVICE • Reception • Apps & Co.

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To find out more visit the cookies section of our privacy policy. The Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism in South Korea has expressed "deep regret" over the International Olympic Committee's (IOC) response to its letter protesting Japan's inclusion of the disputed Liancourt Rocks on its Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games map.

The IOC replied to the letter earlier this week and said it had spoken to the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee regarding the islets on the map of the Olympic Torch Relay, but was told it was a "purely topographical expression" with "no political motivation whatsoever".

A spokesperson for the Ministry told South Korean news agency Yonhap that it would send further correspondence to the IOC as the row continues to rumble on. "We express deep regret over the IOC's response and [we] plan to send another letter on our position," the Ministry said.

"Even though the Tokyo Olympics should be an Olympics of peace and harmony as it is being held at a time when the entire world is suffering from COVID-19, Japan is rejecting requests to delete Dokdo [from the map]." It added it is "very disappointed by Japan's attitude". South Korea claim the islets under the name "Dokdo", while Japan recognise them as part of their territory as "Takeshima".

The disputed islets, which sit between Japan and the Korean Peninsula, where included on the Tokyo 2020 Torch Relay Map ©Tokyo 2020 The Ministry is reportedly looking to south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 in other ways, including sending South Korean IOC members to the IOC headquarters in Switzerland, as well as meeting with Japanese IOC members.

Known neutrally as the Liancourt South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 - as named by French whalers in 1849 - Japan and South Korea both claim the islands as their own territory, as well as North Korea.

South Korea controls the islands. The islands are regarded as important to all nations laying claim to them due to security and fishing rights. In line with the United Nations' exclusive economic zone rule, nations can fish within 200 nautical miles of their coastline.

Natural gas may also be extracted from the islands. The diplomatic row between South Korea and Japan has been a constant presence in the build-up to the postponed Tokyo 2020 Olympics, set to open on July 23.

Contribute For nearly 15 years now, insidethegames.biz has been at the forefront of reporting fearlessly on what happens in the Olympic Movement. As the first website not to be placed behind a paywall, we have made news about the International Olympic Committee, the Olympic and Paralympic Games, the Commonwealth Games and other major events more accessible than ever to everybody.

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Every contribution, however big or small, will help maintain and improve our worldwide coverage in the year ahead. Our small and dedicated team were extremely busy last year covering the re-arranged Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo, an unprecedented logistical challenge that stretched our tight resources to the limit. The remainder of 2022 is not going to be any less busy, or less challenging. We had the Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games in Beijing, where we sent a team of four reporters, and coming up are the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, the Summer World University and Asian Games in China, the World Games in Alabama and multiple World Championships.

Plus, of course, there is the FIFA World Cup in Qatar. Unlike many others, insidethegames.biz is available for everyone to read, regardless of what they can afford to pay. We do this because we believe that sport belongs to everybody, and everybody should be able to read information regardless of their financial situation. While others try to benefit financially from information, we are committed to sharing it with as many people as possible.

The greater the number of people that can keep up to date with global events, and understand their impact, the more sport will be forced to be transparent. Support insidethegames.biz for as little as £10 - it only takes a minute. If you can, please consider supporting us with a regular amount each month. Thank you. Read more Contribute Related stories • June 2021: South Korea calls for IOC action over Japan's disputed territories map for Olympics • August 2019: South Korea express concern about food from Fukushima as Tokyo 2020 Chef de Mission Seminar begins • July 2019: South Korea complain after disputed territory appears on Tokyo 2020 Torch Relay map • February 2018: Japanese Government lodge complaint to Seoul over unified Korean flag • January 2017: Japanese official labels Pyeongchang 2018 "unacceptable" for reference to disputed islands About the author When British skaters Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean won the Olympic gold medal in ice dance at Sarajevo 1984 with 12 perfect 6.0s from every judge, for their interpretation of Maurice Ravel's Boléro, an important member of their team was singer-actor Michael Crawford.

Crawford, who had played Frank Spencer in British sitcom Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em and the title role in the south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 The Phantom of the Opera, had become a mentor to the pair in 1981 and went on to help them create their Olympic routine. Crawford said he “taught them how to act". He was present with their trainer Betty Callaway at the ringside at Sarajevo as they created one of the most iconic moments in Olympic history. UCI - Major Events Delivery Manager - Aigle, SuisseSwitzerland Founded on 14th April 1900 in Paris, the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) is the world governing body for cycling.

Its mission is to develop and supervise cycling in all its forms and for everybody, as a competitive sport, as a healthy recreational activity and as a means of transport and having fun. Reporting to the Head of Olympic Games and Major Events, the Major Events Delivery Manager will be responsible for supporting the planning and delivery to a high standard of the UCI Cycling World Championships and the UCI Emerging countries World Championships or any other identified event hosted on a 4-year cycle.

This includes support for UCI involvement in events such as the Olympic Games and certain related qualification events, Youth Olympic Games, the Paralympic Games. More jobs Twelve years ago the Diamond League athletics circuit began in Qatar, and although the template is largely the same, the meetings have featured some controversial experiments since Wanda became major sponsor in 2020.

Mike Rowbottom speaks to World Athletics chief executive Jon Ridgeon for the inside track on the series' ups and downs. Read more Big Read Archive Contribute For nearly 15 years now, insidethegames.biz has been at the forefront of reporting fearlessly on what happens in the Olympic Movement. As the first website not to be placed behind a paywall, we have made news about the International Olympic Committee, the Olympic and Paralympic Games, the Commonwealth Games and other major events more accessible than ever to everybody.

insidethegames.biz has established a global reputation for the excellence of its reporting and breadth of its coverage. For many of our readers from more than 200 countries and territories around the world the website is a vital part of their daily lives. The ping of our free daily email alert, sent every morning at 6.30am UK time 365 days a year, landing in their inbox, is as a familiar part of their day as their first cup of coffee.

Even during the worst times of the COVID-19 pandemic, insidethegames.biz maintained its high standard of reporting on all the news from around the globe on a daily basis.

We were the first publication in the world to signal the threat that the Olympic Movement faced from the coronavirus and have provided unparalleled coverage of the pandemic since. As the world begins to emerge from the COVID crisis, insidethegames.biz would like to invite you to help us on our journey by funding our independent journalism. Your vital support would mean we can continue to report so comprehensively on the Olympic Movement and the events that shape it.

It would mean we can keep our website open for everyone. Last year, nearly 25 million people read insidethegames.biz, making us by far the biggest source of independent news on what is happening in world sport. Every contribution, however big or small, will help maintain and improve our worldwide coverage in the year ahead.

south korea olympic games tokyo 2020

Our small and dedicated team were extremely busy last year covering the re-arranged Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo, an unprecedented logistical challenge that stretched our tight resources to the limit. The remainder of 2022 is not going to be any less busy, or less challenging. We had the Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games in Beijing, where we sent a team of four reporters, and coming up are the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, the Summer World University and Asian Games in China, the World Games in Alabama and multiple World Championships.

Plus, of course, there is the FIFA World Cup in Qatar. Unlike many others, insidethegames.biz is available for everyone to read, regardless of what they can afford to pay. We do this because we believe that sport belongs to everybody, and everybody should be able to read information regardless of their financial situation.

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Thank you. Read moreSporting event delegation South Korea at the 2020 Summer Olympics IOC code KOR NOC Korean Olympic Committee Website www .sports .or .kr (in Korean and English) in Tokyo, Japan Competitors 237 in 29 sports Flag bearers (opening) Kim Yeon-koung Hwang Sun-woo [2] Flag bearer (closing) Jun Woong-tae [1] Medals Ranked 16th Gold 6 Silver 4 Bronze 10 Total 20 Summer Olympics appearances ( overview) • 1948 • 1952 • 1956 • 1960 • 1964 • 1968 • 1972 • 1976 • 1980 • 1984 • 1988 • 1992 • 1996 • 2000 • 2004 • 2008 • 2012 • 2016 • 2020 South Korea competed at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.

Originally scheduled to take place from 24 July to 9 August 2020, the Games were postponed to 23 July to 8 August 2021, because of the COVID-19 pandemic. [3] Contents • 1 Medalists • 2 Competitors • 3 Archery • 4 Athletics • 5 Badminton • 6 Baseball • 7 Basketball • 7.1 Women's tournament • 8 Boxing • 9 Canoeing • 9.1 Sprint • 10 Cycling • 10.1 Road • 10.2 Track • 11 Diving • 12 Equestrian • 12.1 Dressage • 13 Fencing • 14 Football • 14.1 Men's tournament • 15 Golf • 16 Gymnastics • 16.1 Artistic • 17 Handball • 17.1 Women's tournament • 18 Judo • 19 Karate • 20 Modern pentathlon • 21 Rowing • 22 Rugby sevens • 22.1 Men's tournament • 23 Sailing • 24 Shooting • 25 Sport climbing • 26 Swimming • 27 Table tennis • 28 Taekwondo • 29 Tennis south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 30 Volleyball • 30.1 Indoor • 30.1.1 Women's tournament • 31 Weightlifting • 32 Wrestling • 33 Politics • 34 References Medalists [ edit ] Medal Name Sport Event Date Gold Kim Je-deok An South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 Archery Mixed team 24 July Gold An San Jang Min-hee Kang Chae-young Archery Women's team 25 July Gold Kim Je-deok Kim Woo-jin Oh Jin-hyek Archery Men's team 26 July Gold Oh Sang-uk Kim Jun-ho Kim Jung-hwan Gu Bon-gil Fencing Men's team sabre 28 July Gold An San Archery Women's individual 30 July Gold Shin Jea-hwan Gymnastics Men's vault 2 August Silver Choi In-jeong Kang Young-mi Lee Hye-in Song Se-ra Fencing Women's team épée 27 July Silver Lee Da-bin Taekwondo Women's +67 kg 27 July Silver Cho Gu-ham Judo Men's 100 kg 29 July Silver Kim Min-jung Shooting Women's 25 metre pistol 30 July Bronze Kim Jung-hwan Fencing Men's sabre 24 July Bronze Jang Jun Taekwondo Men's 58 kg 24 July Bronze An Baul Judo Men's 66 kg 25 July Bronze An Chang-rim Judo Men's 73 kg 26 July Bronze In Kyo-don Taekwondo Men's +80 kg 27 July Bronze Kweon Young-jun Ma Se-geon Park Sang-young Song Jae-ho Fencing Men's team épée 30 July Bronze Choi Soo-yeon Kim Ji-yeon Yoon Ji-su Seo Ji-yeon Fencing Women's team sabre 31 July Bronze Yeo Seo-jeong Gymnastics Women's vault 1 August Bronze Kim So-yeong Kong Hee-yong Badminton Women's doubles 2 August Bronze Jun Woong-tae Modern pentathlon Men's individual 7 August Medals by sport Sport Total Archery 4 0 0 4 Badminton 0 0 1 1 Fencing 1 1 3 5 Gymnastics 1 0 1 2 Judo 0 1 2 3 Modern pentathlon 0 0 1 1 Shooting 0 1 0 1 Taekwondo 0 1 2 3 Total 6 4 10 20 Competitors [ edit ] The following is the list of number of competitors in the Games: Sport Men Women Total Archery 3 3 6 Athletics 5 2 7 Badminton 3 7 10 Baseball 24 N/A 24 Basketball 0 12 12 Boxing 0 2 2 Canoeing 1 0 1 Cycling 0 2 2 Diving 3 2 5 Equestrian 1 0 1 Fencing 9 9 18 Football 22 0 22 Golf 2 4 6 Gymnastics 5 2 7 Handball south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 14 14 Karate 1 0 1 Judo 7 7 14 Modern pentathlon 2 2 4 Rowing 0 1 1 Rugby sevens 13 0 13 Sailing 4 0 4 Shooting 7 8 15 Sport climbing 1 1 2 Swimming 7 5 12 Table tennis 3 3 6 Taekwondo 3 3 6 Tennis 1 0 1 Volleyball 0 12 12 Weightlifting 3 4 7 Wrestling 2 0 2 Total 132 105 237 Archery [ edit ] Main articles: Archery at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Archery at the 2020 Summer Olympics - Qualification South Korean archers qualified each for the men's and women's events by reaching the quarterfinal stage of their respective team recurves at the 2019 World Archery Championships in 's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands.

[4] The South Korean archery team for the rescheduled Games was announced on 24 April 2021, including London 2012 gold medalist Oh Jin-hyek and Rio 2016 Olympian and former world record holder Kim Woo-jin. [5] Men Athlete Event Ranking round [6] Round of 64 [7] Round of 32 [8] Round of 16 [9] Quarterfinals [10] Semifinals [11] Final / BM [12] Score Seed Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Kim Je-deok Individual 688 1 David ( MAW) W 6–0 Kahllund ( GER) L 3–7 Did not advance Oh Jin-hyek 681 3 Hammed ( TUN) W 6–0 Das ( IND) L 5–6 Did not advance Kim Woo-jin south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 4 Balogh ( HUN) W 6–0 Plihon ( FRA) W 6–2 Mohamad ( MAS) W 6–0 Tang C-c ( TPE) L 6–4 Did not advance Kim Je-deok Kim Woo-jin Oh Jin-hyek Team 2049 1 N/A Bye India (IND) W 6–0 Japan (JPN) W 5–4 Chinese Taipei (TPE) W 6–0 Women Athlete Event Ranking round [13] Round of 64 [14] Round of 32 [15] Round of 16 [16] Quarterfinals [17] Semifinals [18] Final / BM [19] Score Seed Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank An San Individual 680 1 Hourtou ( CHA) W 6–2 dos Santos ( BRA) W 7–1 Hayakawa ( JPN) W 6–4 Kumari ( IND) W 6–0 Brown ( USA) W 6–5 Osipova ( ROC) W 6–5 Jang Min-hee 677 2 Adam ( EGY) W 6–0 Nakamura ( JPN) L 2–6 Did not advance Kang Chae-young 675 3 Espinosa ( ECU) W 6–0 Marchenko ( UKR) W 7–1 Anagöz ( TUR) W 6–2 Osipova ( ROC) L 1–7 Did not advance An San Jang Min-hee Kang Chae-young Team 2032 1 N/A Bye Italy (ITA) W 6–0 Belarus (BLR) W 5–1 ROC W 6–0 Mixed Athlete Event Ranking round [20] Round of 16 [21] Quarterfinals [22] Semifinals [23] Final / BM [24] Score Seed Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Kim Je-deok An San Team 1368 1 Bangladesh (BAN) W 6–0 India (IND) W 6–2 Mexico (MEX) W 5–1 Netherlands (NED) W 5–3 Athletics [ edit ] Main articles: Athletics at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Athletics at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korean athletes further achieved the entry standards, either by qualifying time or by world ranking, in the following track and field events (up to a maximum of 3 athletes in each event): [25] [26] Key • Note–Ranks given for track events are within the athlete's heat only • Q = Qualified for the next round • q = Qualified for the next round as a fastest loser or, in field events, by position without achieving the qualifying target • NR = National record • N/A = Round not applicable for the event • Bye = Athlete not required to compete in round Track & road events Athlete Event Final Result Rank Choe Byeong-kwang Men's 20 km walk 1:28:12 37 Oh Joo-han Men's marathon DNF Shim Jung-sub 2:20:36 49 Ahn Seul-ki Women's marathon 2:41:11 57 Choi Kyung-sun 2:35:33 34 Field events Athlete Event Qualification Final Distance Position Distance Position Jin Min-sub Men's pole vault 5.50 19 Did not advance Woo Sang-hyeok Men's high jump 2.28 =9 q 2.35 NR 4 Badminton [ edit ] Main articles: Badminton at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Badminton at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korea entered ten badminton players (three men and seven women) for the following events based on the BWF Race to Tokyo Rankings: two entries in the women's singles, one in the men's singles, two pairs in the women's doubles, and a pair each in the men's and mixed doubles.

[27] Men Athlete Event Group Stage [28] Elimination Quarterfinal [29] Semifinal Final / BM Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Heo Kwang-hee Singles Lam ( USA) South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 (21–10, 21–15) Momota ( JPN) W (21–15, 21–19) N/A 1 Q Bye Cordón ( GUA) L (13–21, 18–21) Did not advance Choi Sol-gyu Seo Seung-jae Doubles Chia / Soh ( MAS) L (22–24, 15–21) Ho-Shue / Yakura ( CAN) W (21–14, 21–8) Ahsan / Setiawan ( INA) L (22–24, 21–13, 18–21) 3 N/A Did not advance Women Athlete Event Group Stage [30] Elimination [31] Quarterfinal [32] Semifinal [33] Final / BM [34] Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank An Se-young Singles Azurmendi ( ESP) W (21–13, 21–8) Adesokan ( NGR) W (21–3, 21–6) N/A 1 South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 Ongbamrungphan ( THA) W (21–15, 21–15) Chen Yf ( CHN) L (18–21, 19–21) Did not advance Kim Ga-eun Gaitan ( MEX) W (21–14, 21–9) Yeo J M ( SGP) W (21–13, 21–14) N/A 1 Q Yamaguchi ( JPN) L (17–21, 18–21) Did not advance Kim So-yeong Kong Hee-yong Doubles G Stoeva / S Stoeva ( BUL) W (21–23, 21–12, 23–21) Kititharakul / Prajongjai ( THA) W (21–19, 24–22) Chen Qc / Jia Yf ( CHN) L (21–19, 16–21, 14–21) 2 Q N/A Matsumoto / Nagahara ( JPN) W (21–14, 14–21, 28–26) Chen Qc / Jia Yf ( CHN) L (15–21, 11–21) Lee S-h/ Shin S-c ( KOR) W (21–10, 21–17) Lee So-hee Shin Seung-chan Mapasa / Somerville ( AUS) W (21–9, 21–6) Fruergaard / Thygesen ( DEN) L (21–15, 19–21, 20–22) Du Y / Li Yh ( CHN) W (21–19, 21–12) 1 Q N/A Piek / Seinen ( NED) W (21–8, 21–17) Polii / Rahayu ( INA) L (19–21, 17–21) Kim S-y/ Kong H-y ( KOR) L (10–21, 17–21) 4 Mixed Athlete Event Group Stage [35] Quarterfinal [36] Semifinal Final / BM Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Seo Seung-jae Chae Yoo-jung Doubles Tabeling / Piek ( NED) W (16–21, 21–15, 21–11) Elgamal / Hany ( EGY) W (21–7, 21–3) Zheng Sw / South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 Yq ( CHN) L (14–21, 17–21) 2 Q Wang Yy / Huang Dp ( CHN) L (9–21, 16–21) Did not advance Baseball [ edit ] Main article: Baseball at the 2020 Summer Olympics South Korea national baseball team qualified for the Olympics by advancing to the final match and securing an outright berth as the highest-ranked squad from Asia and Oceania, excluding the host nation Japan, at the 2019 WBSC Premier12 in Tokyo.

[37] Summary Team Event Group stage Round 1 Round 2 Semifinal Semifinal 2 Final / BM Opposition Result Opposition Result Rank Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Rank South Korea men's Men's tournament Israel W 6–5 United States L 2–4 2 Q Dominican Republic W 4–3 Israel W 11–1 Japan L 2–5 United States L 2–7 Dominican Republic L 6–10 4 Team roster The Korea Baseball Organization announced the team's final roster on June 15, 2021. [38] Baseball at the 2020 Summer Olympics – South Korea roster Players Coaches Pitchers • 23 Cha Woo-chan • 11 Cho Sang-woo • 61 Choi Won-joon • 19 Go Woo-suk • 15 Kim Jin-uk • 55 Kim Min-woo • 1 Ko Young-pyo • 48 Lee Eui-lee • 21 Oh Seung-hwan • 32 Park Se-woong • 18 Won Tae-in Catchers • 47 Kang Min-ho • 25 Yang Eui-ji Infielders • 53 Choi Joo-hwan • 13 Hur Kyoung-min • 10 Hwang Jae-gyun • 50 Kang Baek-ho • 3 Kim Hye-seong • 44 Oh Jae-il • 2 Oh Ji-hwan Outfielders • 22 Kim Hyun-soo • 51 Lee Jung-hoo • 17 Park Hae-min • 37 Park Kun-woo Manager • 74 Kim Kyung-moon Coaches • 73 Choi Il-eon south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 • 79 Chong Tae-hyon (Pitching) • 88 Kim Jae-hyun (Hitting) • 77 Kim Jong-kook (Base) • 75 Lee Jong-yeol (Defense) • 70 Jin Kab-yong (Battery) Group play Pos Team Source: TOCOG and WBSC 29 July 19:00 Yokohama Stadium Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 R H E Israel 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 5 7 0 South Korea 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 0 1 6 11 0 WP: Oh Seung-hwan (1–0) LP: Jeremy Bleich (0–1) Home runs: ISR: Ian Kinsler (1), Ryan Lavarnway 2 (2) KOR: Oh Ji-hwan (1), Lee Jung-hoo (1), Hyun-soo Kim (1) Boxscore 31 July 19:00 Yokohama Stadium Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E South Korea 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 5 0 United States 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 X 4 6 0 WP: Nick Martinez (1–0) LP: Ko Young-pyo (0–1) Sv: David Robertson (1) Home runs: KOR: None USA: Triston Casas (1), Nick Allen (1) Boxscore Round 1 1 August 19:00 Yokohama Stadium Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E Dominican Republic 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 6 0 South Korea 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 12 1 WP: Oh Seung-hwan (2–0) LP: Luis Felipe Castillo (0–1) Home runs: DOM: Juan Francisco (1) KOR: None Boxscore Round 2 2 August 12:00 Yokohama Stadium Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E Israel 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 X X 1 3 2 South Korea ( 7) 1 2 0 0 7 0 1 X X 11 18 0 WP: Cho Sang-woo (1–0) LP: Joey Wagman (0–2) Home runs: ISR: None KOR: Oh Ji-hwan (2), Hyun-soo Kim (2) Boxscore Semifinals 4 August 19:00 Yokohama Stadium Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E South Korea 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 7 1 Japan 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 3 X 5 9 1 WP: Hiromi Itoh (1–0) LP: Go Woo-suk (0–1) Sv: Ryoji Kuribayashi (2) Boxscore 5 August 19:00 Yokohama Stadium Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E South Korea 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 7 0 United States 0 1 0 1 0 5 0 0 X 7 9 1 WP: Ryder Ryan (1–0) LP: Lee Eui-lee (0–1) Home runs: KOR: None USA: Jamie Westbrook (1) Boxscore Bronze medal game 7 August 12:00 Yokohama Stadium Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E Dominican Republic 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 0 10 14 0 South Korea 0 1 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 6 south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 0 WP: Cristopher Mercedes (1–0) LP: Oh Seung-hwan (2–1) Sv: Jumbo Díaz (1) Home runs: DOM: Juan Francisco (2), Julio Rodríguez (1), Johan Mieses (2) KOR: Hyun-soo Kim (3) Boxscore Basketball [ edit ] Main article: Basketball at the 2020 Summer Olympics Summary Team Event Group stage Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank South Korea women's Women's tournament Spain L 69–73 Canada L 53–74 Serbia L 61–65 4 Did not advance Women's tournament [ edit ] Main articles: Basketball at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament and Basketball at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Women's qualification South Korea women's basketball team qualified for the Olympics as one of three highest-ranked eligible squads from group B at the Belgrade meet of the 2020 FIBA Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament, marking the country's recurrence to the sport for the first time in 12 years.

[39] Team roster The roster was announced on 23 June 2021. [40] South Korea women's national basketball south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 – 2020 Summer Olympics roster Players Coaches Pos. No. Name South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 – Date of birth Height Club Ctr. PG 1 Shin Ji-hyun 25 – ( 1995-09-12)12 September 1995 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) Bucheon Hana 1Q PF 2 Han Eom-ji 22 – ( 1998-11-10)10 November 1998 1.79 m (5 ft 10 south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 Incheon S-Birds F 3 Kang Lee-seul 27 – ( 1994-04-05)5 April 1994 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) Cheongju KB Stars G 4 Yoon Ye-bin 24 – ( 1997-04-16)16 April 1997 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) Samsung Life Blueminx PG 5 An He-ji 24 – ( 1997-02-12)12 February 1997 1.64 m (5 ft 5 in) Busan BNK Sum G 7 Park Hye-jin 31 – ( 1990-07-22)22 July 1990 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) Asan Woori Bank Wibee F 9 Park Ji-hyun 21 – ( 2000-04-07)7 April 2000 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) Asan Woori Bank Wibee C 11 Bae Hye-yoon 32 – ( 1989-06-10)10 June 1989 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) Samsung Life Blueminx F 13 Kim Jung-eun 33 – ( 1987-09-07)7 September 1987 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) Asan Woori Bank Wibee C 19 Park Ji-su 22 – ( 1998-12-06)6 December 1998 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) Las Vegas Aces F 23 Kim Dan-bi 31 – ( 1990-02-27)27 February 1990 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) Incheon S-Birds F 31 Jin An 25 – south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 1996-03-23)23 March 1996 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) Busan BNK Sum Head coach • Chun Joo-weon [41] Assistant coach(es) • Lee Mi-sun Legend • Club – describes last club before the tournament • Age – describes age on 26 July 2021 Group play Pos Team Main articles: Boxing at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Boxing at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korea entered two female boxers for the first time into the Olympic tournament.

Im Ae-ji (women's featherweight) and defending Asian Games champion Oh Yeon-ji (women's lightweight) secured the spots on the South Korean squad by advancing to the semifinal match of their respective weight divisions at the 2020 Asia & Oceania Qualification Tournament in Amman, Jordan. [42] Athlete Event Round of 32 Round of 16 [43] Quarterfinals Semifinals Final Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Rank Im Ae-ji Women's featherweight Bye Nicolson ( AUS) L 1–4 Did not advance Oh Yeon-ji Women's lightweight Bye Potkonen ( FIN) L 1–4 Did not advance Canoeing [ edit ] Main articles: Canoeing at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Canoeing at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification Sprint [ edit ] South Korea qualified a single boat (men's K-1 200 m) for the Games by winning the gold medal at the 2021 Asian Canoe Sprint Qualification Regatta in Pattaya, Thailand.

Athlete Event Heats Quarterfinals Semifinals Final Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Cho Kwang-hee Men's K-1 200 m 35.738 3 QF 35.048 1 SF 36.094 6 FB 36.440 13 Qualification Legend: FA = Qualify to final (medal); FB = Qualify to final B (non-medal); SF = Qualify to semifinal; QF = Qualify to quarterfinal Cycling [ edit ] Main articles: Cycling at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Cycling at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification Road [ edit ] South Korea entered one rider to compete in the women's Olympic road race, by securing an outright berth, as the highest-ranked cyclist, not yet qualified, at the 2019 Asian Championships in Tashkent, Uzbekistan.

[44] Athlete Event Time Rank Na Ah-reum Women's road race 4:01:08 38 [45] Track [ edit ] Following the completion of the 2020 UCI Track Cycling World Championships, South Korea entered one rider to compete in the women's sprint and keirin based on her final individual UCI Olympic rankings. Sprint Athlete Event Qualification Round 1 Repechage 1 Round 2 Repechage 2 Round 3 Repechage 3 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final Time Speed (km/h) Rank Opposition Rank Opposition Rank Opposition Rank Opposition Rank Opposition Rank Opposition Rank Opposition Rank Opposition Rank Opposition Rank Rank Lee Hye-jin Women's sprint 10.904 66.031 21 Q Gros ( FRA) L Godby ( USA) Shmeleva ( ROC) L Did not advance Keirin Athlete Event Round 1 Repechage Quarterfinals Semifinals Final Rank Rank Rank Rank Rank Lee Hye-jin Women's keirin 3 R 3 Did not advance Diving [ edit ] Main articles: Diving at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Diving at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korean divers qualified for five individual spots and the men's synchronized springboard south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 at the Games through the 2019 FINA World Championships and the 2021 FINA Diving World Cup.

Athlete Event Preliminaries [46] [47] [48] [49] Semifinals [50] [51] [52] Final [53] [54] [55] Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank Kim Yeong-nam Men's 3 m springboard 286.80 28 Did not advance Kim Yeong-taek Men's 10 m platform 366.80 18 Q 374.90 15 Did not advance Woo Ha-ram Men's 3 m springboard 452.45 5 Q 403.15 12 Q 481.85 4 Men's 10 m platform 427.25 7 Q 374.50 16 Did not advance Kim Yeong-nam Woo Ha-ram Men's 10 m synchronized platform N/A 396.12 7 Kim Su-ji Women's 3 m springboard 304.20 7 Q 283.90 15 Did south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 advance Kwon Ha-lim Women's 10 m platform 278.00 19 Did not advance Equestrian [ edit ] Main articles: Equestrian at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Equestrian at the 2020 Summer Olympics - Qualification South Korea entered one dressage rider into the Olympic equestrian competition, by finishing in the top two, outside the group selection, of the individual FEI Olympic Rankings for Group G (South East Asia and Oceania).

[56] Dressage [ edit ] Athlete Horse Event Grand Prix [57] Grand Prix Freestyle Overall Score Rank Technical Artistic Score Rank Kim Dong-seon Belstaff Individual 63.447 55 Did not advance Qualification Legend: Q = Qualified for the final; q = Qualified for the final as a lucky loser Fencing [ edit ] Main articles: Fencing at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Fencing at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korean fencers qualified a full squad each in the men's and women's team sabre and women's team épée at the Games by finishing among the top four nations in the FIE Olympic Team Rankings, while the men's épée team claimed the spot each as the highest-ranked nation from Asia outside the world's top four.

2018 Asian Games men's foil champion Lee Kwang-hyun and two-time Olympian Jeon Hee-sook (women's foil) earned additional places on the South Korean team as one of the two highest-ranked fencers vying for qualification from Asia and Oceania in their respective individual events of the FIE Adjusted Official Rankings.

Men Athlete Event Round of 64 [58] Round of 32 [59] Round of 16 [60] Quarterfinal [61] Semifinal [62] Final [63] Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Kweon Young-jun Épée Bye Verwijlen ( NED) L 10–15 Did not advance Ma Se-geon Petrov ( KGZ) L 7–15 Did not advance Park Sang-young Bye Hoyle ( USA) W 15–10 Minobe ( JPN) W 15–6 Siklósi ( HUN) L 12–15 Did not advance Kweon Young-jun Ma Se-geon Park Sang-young Song Jae-ho Team épée N/A Bye Switzerland (SUI) W 44–39 Japan (JPN) L 38–45 China (CHN) W 45–42 Lee Kwang-hyun Foil Bye Borodachev ( ROC) L 14–15 Did not advance Gu Bon-gil Sabre Bye Szabo ( GER) L 8–15 Did not advance Kim Jung-hwan Bye Lokhanov ( ROC) W 15–11 Dershwitz ( USA) W 15–9 Ibragimov ( ROC) W 15–14 Samele ( ITA) L 12–15 Bazadze ( GEO) W 15–11 Oh Sang-uk Bye Mackiewicz ( USA) W 15–7 Amer ( EGY) W 15–9 Bazadze ( GEO) L 13–15 Did not advance Gu Bon-gil Kim Jung-hwan Oh Sang-uk Kim Jun-ho Team sabre N/A Bye Egypt (EGY) W 45–39 Germany (GER) W 45–42 Italy (ITA) W 45–26 Women Athlete Event Round of 64 Round of 32 [64] Round of 16 [65] Quarterfinal [66] Semifinal [67] Final [68] Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Choi In-jeong Épée Bye Murtazaeva ( ROC) L 11–15 Did not advance Kang Young-mi Bye Sato ( JPN) L 14–15 Did not advance Song Se-ra Bye Holmes ( USA) W 15–13 Popescu ( ROU) L 6–15 Did not advance Choi In-jeong Kang Young-mi Song Se-ra Lee Hye-in Team épée N/A United States (USA) W 38–33 China (CHN) W 38–29 Estonia (EST) L 32–36 Jeon Hee-sook Foil Bye Azuma ( JPN) W 11–10 Chen Qy ( CHN) W 14–11 Deriglazova ( ROC) L 7–15 Did not advance Choi Soo-yeon Sabre Bye Berder ( FRA) W 15–11 Márton ( HUN) L 12–15 Did not advance Kim South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 Bye Hafez ( EGY) W 15–4 Zagunis ( USA) L 12–15 Did not advance Yoon Ji-su Bye Criscio ( ITA) W 15–11 Dayibekova ( UZB) L 12–15 Did not advance Choi Soo-yeon Kim Ji-yeon Yoon Ji-su Seo Ji-yeon Team sabre N/A Bye Hungary (HUN) W 45–40 ROC L 26–45 Italy (ITA) W 45–42 Football [ edit ] Key: • A.E.T – After extra time.

• P – Match decided by penalty-shootout. Team Event Group Stage Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank South Korea men's Men's tournament New Zealand L 0–1 Romania W 4–0 Honduras W 6–0 1 Q Mexico L 3–6 Did not advance Men's tournament [ edit ] Main articles: Football at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Men's tournament and Football at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Men's qualification South Korea men's football team qualified for the Olympics by advancing to the final match of the 2020 AFC U-23 Championship in Thailand.

[69] [70] Team roster South Korea's final squad was announced on 2 July 2021. [71] [72] [73] Head coach: Kim Hak-bum No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club 1 1 GK Song Bum-keun ( 1997-10-15)15 October 1997 (aged 23) 19 0 Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors 2 2 DF Lee You-hyeon ( 1997-02-08)8 February 1997 (aged 24) 15 0 Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors 3 2 DF Kim Jae-woo ( 1998-02-06)6 February 1998 (aged 23) 10 1 Daegu 4 2 DF Park Ji-soo* ( 1994-06-13)13 June 1994 (aged 27) 0 0 Gimcheon Sangmu 5 2 DF Jeong Tae-wook ( 1997-05-16)16 May 1997 (aged 24) 19 2 Daegu 6 3 MF Jeong Seung-won ( 1997-02-27)27 February 1997 (aged 24) 13 0 Ulsan Hyundai 7 3 MF Kwon Chang-hoon* ( 1994-06-30)30 June 1994 (aged 27) 21 11 Suwon Samsung Bluewings 8 3 MF Lee Kang-in ( 2001-02-19)19 February 2001 (aged 20) 3 0 Valencia 9 4 FW Song Min-kyu ( 1999-09-12)12 September 1999 (aged 21) 5 1 Pohang Steelers 10 3 MF Lee Dong-gyeong ( 1997-09-20)20 September 1997 (aged 23) 14 10 Ulsan Hyundai 11 4 FW Lee Dong-jun ( 1997-02-01)1 February 1997 (aged 24) 15 7 Ulsan Hyundai 12 2 DF Seol Young-woo ( 1998-12-05)5 December 1998 (aged 22) 5 0 Ulsan Hyundai 13 2 DF Kim Jin-ya ( 1998-06-30)30 June 1998 (aged 23) 26 1 Seoul 14 3 MF Kim Dong-hyun ( 1997-06-11)11 June 1997 (aged 24) 15 0 Gangwon 15 3 MF Won Du-jae ( 1997-11-18)18 November 1997 (aged 23) 13 0 Ulsan Hyundai 16 4 FW Hwang Ui-jo* ( 1992-08-28)28 August 1992 (aged 28) 24 14 Bordeaux 17 4 FW Um Won-sang ( 1999-01-06)6 January 1999 (aged 22) 16 1 Gwangju 18 1 GK Ahn Joon-soo ( 1998-01-28)28 January 1998 (aged 23) 5 0 Busan IPark 19 2 DF Kang Yoon-sung ( 1997-07-01)1 July 1997 (aged 24) 13 0 Jeju United 20 2 DF Lee Sang-min ( captain) ( 1998-01-01)1 January 1998 (aged 23) 21 1 Seoul E-Land 21 3 MF Kim Jin-kyu ( 1997-02-24)24 February 1997 (aged 24) 10 1 Busan IPark 22 1 GK An Chan-gi ( 1998-04-06)6 April 1998 (aged 23) 4 0 Suwon Samsung Bluewings * Over-aged player.

Group play Pos Team Main articles: Golf at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Golf at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korea entered two male and four female golfers into the Olympic tournament. Athlete Event Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Total [74] Score Score Score Score Score Par Rank Im Sung-jae Men's 70 73 63 68 274 −10 =22 Kim Si-woo 68 71 70 67 276 −8 =32 Ko Jin-young Women's 68 67 71 68 274 −10 =9 Inbee Park 69 70 71 69 279 −5 =23 Kim Sei-young 69 69 68 68 274 −10 =9 Kim Hyo-joo 70 68 70 67 275 −9 =15 Gymnastics [ edit ] Main articles: Gymnastics at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Gymnastics at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification Artistic [ edit ] South Korea qualified seven artistic gymnasts into the Olympic competition: a full men's team of four, which will compete in the team competition, as well as one man and two women competing as individuals.

The men's squad claimed one of nine remaining spots in the team competition at the 2019 World Championships in Stuttgart, Germany (China, Russia, & Japan had already qualified at the 2018 World Championships), and Shin Jea-hwan qualified through the World Cup Series, finishing first in the standings on men's VT. [75] On the women's side, Lee Yun-seo earned a berth through her placement in the all-around at the 2019 World Championships, while Yeo Seo-jeong, with her finish in the event finals on vault, secured an additional berth available for gymnasts who did not qualify through either the team or the all-around through the apparatus finals at the same event.

[76] [77] The individual qualifiers, including those who qualified due to their performances on individual events, are eligible to compete in all events at the Olympics. [75] Men Team Athlete Event Qualification [78] Final Apparatus Total Rank Apparatus Total Rank FX PH SR VT PB HB FX PH SR VT PB HB Kim Han-sol Team 14.900 Q 11.833 13.600 14.333 13.666 12.800 81.032 39 Did not advance Lee Jun-ho 13.733 12.900 13.700 14.333 14.266 13.366 82.398 28 Q Ryu Sung-hyun 15.066 Q 12.900 13.166 14.500 11.966 13.133 80.731 41 Yang Hak-seon N/A 14.366 N/A 14.366 9 Total 43.699 37.633 40.466 43.799 39.898 39.299 244.794 11 Individual Athlete Event Qualification [78] Final [79] Apparatus Total Rank Apparatus Total Rank FX PH SR VT PB HB FX PH SR VT PB HB Kim Han-sol Floor 14.900 N/A 14.900 5 Q 13.066 N/A 13.066 8 Lee Jun-ho All-around See team results 13.966 12.766 13.466 13.800 14.166 12.300 80.464 22 Ryu Sung-hyun Floor 15.066 N/A 15.066 3 Q 14.233 N/A 14.233 4 Shin Jea-hwan Vault N/A 14.866 N/A 1 Q N/A 14.783 N/A Women Athlete Event Qualification [80] Final [81] Apparatus Total Rank Apparatus Total Rank VT UB BB FX VT UB BB FX Lee Yun-seo All-around 13.400 14.333 12.841 12.966 53.540 29 Q 13.400 14.300 11.266 12.666 51.632 21 Yeo Seo-jeong Vault 14.800 N/A 14.800 5 Q 14.733 N/A 14.733 Handball [ edit ] Key: • ET: After extra time • P – Match decided by penalty-shootout.

Team Event Group Stage Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank South Korea women's Women's tournament Norway L 27–39 Netherlands L 36–43 Japan W 27–24 Montenegro L 26–28 Angola D 31–31 4 Q Sweden L 30–39 Did not advance Women's tournament [ edit ] Main article: Handball at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament The South Korean women's handball team qualified for the Olympics by winning the gold medal at the 2019 Asian Qualification Tournament in Chuzhou, China.

[82] Team roster The squad was announced on 14 June 2021. [83] Head coach: Kang Jae-won No. Pos. Name Date of birth (age) Height App. Goals Club 1 GK Ju Hui ( 1989-11-04)4 November 1989 (aged 31) 1.80 m 40 0 Busan 10 P Won Seon-pil ( 1994-08-06)6 August 1994 (aged 26) 1.74 m 5 14 Incheon 11 RB Ryu Eun-hee ( 1990-02-24)24 February 1990 (aged 31) 1.79 m 83 297 Győri Audi ETO KC 12 GK Jeong Jin-hui ( 1999-03-24)24 March 1999 (aged 22) 1.80 m 5 0 Korea National Sport University 13 RW Kim Yun-ji ( 2000-01-16)16 January 2000 (aged 21) 1.70 m 0 0 Samcheok 15 LW Choi Su-min ( 1990-01-09)9 January 1990 (aged 31) 1.77 m 49 155 SK Sugar Gliders 17 LB Sim Hae-in ( 1987-10-31)31 October 1987 (aged 33) 1.78 m 64 117 Busan 19 P Kang Eun-hye ( 1996-04-17)17 April 1996 (aged 25) 1.86 m 8 21 Busan 21 LW Jo Ha-rang ( 1991-07-15)15 July 1991 (aged 30) 1.65 m 9 67 Daegu 22 P Gim Bo-eun ( 1997-12-08)8 December 1997 (aged 23) 1.76 m 5 9 Samcheok 23 CB Lee Mi-gyeong ( 1991-10-02)2 October 1991 (aged 29) 1.70 m 43 65 Busan 24 CB Kang Kyung-min ( 1996-11-08)8 November 1996 (aged 24) 1.65 m 12 30 Gwangju 25 RB Jung Yu-ra ( 1992-02-06)6 February 1992 (aged 29) 1.70 m south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 37 Daegu 27 LB Kim Jin-yi ( 1993-06-20)20 June 1993 (aged 28) 1.80 m 50 115 Busan 34 RW Jung Ji-in ( 2000-07-18)18 July 2000 (aged 21) 1.80 m 5 13 Korea National Sport University Group play Pos Team • ^ a b South Korea 31–31 Angola 25 July 2021 16:15 Norway 39–27 South Korea Yoyogi National Gymnasium, Tokyo Referees: Bonaventura, Bonaventura ( FRA) Brattset Dale 11 (18–10) Sim 5 5× Report 1× 2× 27 July 2021 16:15 South Korea 36–43 Netherlands Yoyogi National Gymnasium, Tokyo Referees: Lah, Sok ( SLO) Ryu 10 (15–19) Abbingh 6 1× 2× Report 2× 7× 29 July 2021 14:15 Japan 24–27 South Korea Yoyogi National Gymnasium, Tokyo Referees: Kurtagic, Wetterwik ( SWE) Kondo 7 (11–12) Ryu 9 1× 3× Report 3× 31 July 2021 11:00 Montenegro 28–26 South Korea Yoyogi National Gymnasium, Tokyo Referees: El-Saied, El-Saied ( EGY) Radičević 6 (13–11) Lee 10 2× 4× Report 3× 2 August 2021 09:00 South Korea 31–31 Angola Yoyogi National Gymnasium, Tokyo Referees: Bonaventura, Bonaventura ( FRA) Jung, Kang E.

7 (16–17) Guialo 8 Report 7× Quarterfinal 4 August 2021 17:00 Sweden 39–30 South Korea Yoyogi National Gymnasium, Tokyo Referees: Alpaidze, Berezkina ( RUS) three players 6 (21–13) Kang K. 8 1× 3× Report 4× Judo [ edit ] Main articles: Judo at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Judo at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification Men Athlete Event Round of 64 Round of 32 [84] Round of 16 [85] Quarterfinals [86] Semifinals [87] Repechage [88] Final [89] Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Rank Kim Won-jin −60 kg N/A Bye Takabatake ( BRA) W 10–00 Smetov ( KAZ) L 00–10 Did not advance Chkhvimiani ( GEO) W 10–00 Mkheidze ( FRA) L 00–10 =5 An Ba-ul −66 kg N/A Bye Chinchila ( CRC) W 10–00 Gomboc ( SLO) W 10–00 Margvelashvili ( GEO) L 00–01 Bye Lombardo ( ITA) W 10–00 An Chang-rim −73 kg Bye Basile ( ITA) W 01–00 Turaev ( South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 W 01–00 Butbul ( ISR) W 01–00 Shavdatuashvili ( GEO) L 00–10 Bye Orujov ( AZE) W 01–00 Lee Sung-ho −81 kg Bye Elias ( LBN) W 10–00 Grigalashvili ( GEO) L 00–10 Did not advance Gwak Dong-han −90 kg Bye Anani ( GHA) W 10–00 Trippel ( GER) L 00–10 Did not advance Cho Gu-ham −100 kg N/A Bye Kukolj ( SRB) W 10–00 Frey ( GER) W 01–00 Fonseca ( POR) W 01–00 Bye Wolf ( JPN) L 00–10 Kim Min-jong +100 kg N/A Bye Harasawa ( JPN) L 00–10 Did not advance Women Athlete Event Round of 32 [90] Round of 16 [91] Quarterfinals [92] Semifinals [93] Repechage [94] Final / BM [95] Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Rank Kang Yu-jeong −48 kg Štangar ( SLO) L 01–10 Did not advance Park Da-sol −52 kg Cesar ( GBS) W 11–00 Kuziutina ( ROC) W 01–00 Buchard ( FRA) L 00–10 Did not advance Pupp ( HUN) L 00–01 Did not advance =7 Kim Ji-su −57 kg Roper ( PAN) W 10–00 Cysique ( FRA) L 00–01 Did not advance Han Hee-ju −63 kg Trstenjak ( SLO) L 00–01 Did not advance Kim Seong-yeon −70 kg Sophina ( CMR) W 10–00 Polleres ( AUT) L 00–01 Did not advance Yoon Hyun-ji −78 kg Papadakis ( USA) W 10–00 Powell ( GBR) W 11–00 Steenhuis ( NED) W 10–00 Malonga ( FRA) L 00–10 Bye Aguiar ( BRA) L 00–10 =5 Han Mi-jin +78 kg Savelkouls ( NED) W 01–00 Slutskaya ( BLR) W 10–00 Kindzerska ( AZE) L 00–11 Did not advance Sayit ( TUR) L 00–10 Did not advance =7 Mixed Athlete Event Round of 16 [96] Quarterfinals Semifinals Repechage Final / BM Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Rank An Chang-rim Gwak Dong-han Kim Min-jong Han Mi-jin Kim Ji-su Kim Seong-yeon Team Mongolia (MGL) L 1–4 Did not advance Karate [ edit ] Main articles: Karate at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Karate at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korea entered one karateka into the inaugural Olympic tournament.

Park Hee-jun qualified directly for the men's kata category by finishing third in the final pool round at the 2021 World Olympic Qualification Tournament in Paris, France. [97] Athlete Event Elimination round Ranking round Final / BM Score Rank Score Rank Opposition Result Rank Park Hee-jun Men's kata 25.62 3 Q 25.98 3 q Sofuoğlu ( TUR) L 26.14–27.26 5 Modern pentathlon [ edit ] Main articles: Modern pentathlon at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Modern pentathlon at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korean athletes qualified for the following spots to compete in modern pentathlon.

Rio 2016 Olympian Jun Woong-tae secured his selection in the men's race by winning the bronze medal and sealing one of three spots available at the 2019 UIPM World Championships in Budapest, Hungary. [98] Meanwhile, Asian Games silver medalists Lee Ji-hun and Kim Se-hee confirmed places each in their respective events with gold-medal victories at the 2019 Asia & Oceania Championships in Kunming, China. [99] [100] Jung Jin-hwa replaces Lee Ji-hun. [101] Athlete Event Fencing (épée one touch) Swimming (200 m freestyle) Riding (show jumping) Combined: shooting/running (10 m air pistol)/(3200 m) Total points Final rank RR BR Rank MP points Time Rank MP points Penalties Rank MP points Time Rank MP Points Jun Woong-tae Men's 21-14 0 9 226 1:57.23 6 316 11 11 289 11:01.84 7 639 1470 Jung Jin-hwa 23-12 1 5 238 1:57.85 7 315 7 6 293 11:21.95 17 619 1466 4 Kim Se-hee Women's 24-11 2 2 246 2:16.36 21 278 14 18 286 13:00.70 24 520 1330 11 Kim Sun-woo 19-16 0 14 214 2:16.36 21 278 16 21 284 13:07.80 27 513 1296 17 Rowing [ edit ] Main articles: Rowing at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Rowing at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korea qualified one boat in the women's single sculls for the Games by finishing sixth in the A-final and securing the third of five berths available at the 2021 FISA Asia & Oceania Olympic Qualification Regatta in Tokyo, Japan.

[102] Athlete Event Heats [103] Repechage [104] Quarterfinals [105] Semifinals [106] Final [107] Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Jeong Hye-jeong Women's single sculls 8:12.15 5 R 8:26.73 2 QF 8:38.70 6 SC/D 8:06.32 6 FD 8:06.13 24 Qualification Legend: FA=Final A (medal); FB=Final B (non-medal); FC=Final C (non-medal); FD=Final D (non-medal); FE=Final E (non-medal); FF=Final F (non-medal); SA/B=Semifinals A/B; SC/D=Semifinals C/D; SE/F=Semifinals E/F; QF=Quarterfinals; R=Repechage Rugby sevens south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 edit ] Main article: Rugby sevens at the 2020 Summer Olympics Summary Team Event Group stage Quarterfinal 9–12th place Semifinal 11th place match Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank South Korea men's Men's tournament New Zealand L 5–50 Australia L 5–42 Argentina L 0–56 4 N/A Ireland L 0–31 Japan L 19–31 12 Men's tournament [ edit ] Main article: Rugby sevens at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Men's tournament South Korea national rugby sevens team qualified for the Games by winning the gold medal and securing a lone outright berth at the 2019 Asian Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Incheon, marking the country's debut in the sport.

[108] Team roster South Korea's 12-man squad plus one alternate was named on 6 July 2021. [109] Head coach: Seo Chun-oh No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Events Points 1 FW Han Kun-kyu ( c) ( 1987-01-22)22 January 1987 (aged 34) 4 20 2 FW Kim Hyun-soo ( 1988-11-08)8 November 1988 (aged 32) 4 25 south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 FW Andre Jin Coquillard ( 1991-01-15)15 January 1991 (aged 30) 2 10 4 BK Chang Yong-heung ( 1993-11-12)12 November 1993 (aged 27) 0 0 5 BK Lee Seong-bae ( 1990-04-07)7 April 1990 (aged 31) 3 13 6 BK Kim Nam-uk ( 1990-02-05)5 February 1990 (aged 31) 2 0 7 BK Jang Jeong-min ( 1994-11-10)10 November 1994 (aged 26) 2 27 8 FW Jang Seong-min ( 1992-08-22)22 August 1992 (aged 28) 2 5 9 BK Park Wan-yong ( c) ( 1984-06-02)2 June 1984 (aged 37) 5 25 10 FW Lee Jin-kyu ( 1994-07-04)4 July 1994 (aged 27) 1 0 11 FW Choi Seong-deok ( 1999-05-31)31 May 1999 (aged 22) 0 0 12 BK Jeong Yeon-sik ( 1993-05-08)8 May 1993 (aged 28) 1 0 13 BK Kim Gwong-min ( 1988-04-02)2 April 1988 (aged 33) 0 0 Group play Pos Team 26 July 2021 ( 2021-07-26) 10:00 New Zealand 50–5 South Korea Try: Knewstubb 2' c Mikkelson (2) 7' c, 8' m Penalty try 8' Warbrick (2) 10' c, 14' m Nanai-Seturo 12' m McGarvey-Black 13' c South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 Knewstubb (2/3) 2', 7' McGarvey-Black (2/3) 10', 13' Baker (0/1) (Tokyo 2020) Try: Jeong 5' m Con: Lee (0/1) Main articles: Sailing at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Sailing at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korean sailors qualified one south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 in each of the following classes through the 2018 Sailing World Championships, the class-associated Worlds, the 2018 Asian Games, and the continental regattas.

[110] Athlete Event Race [111] [112] Net points Final rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 M* Cho Won-woo Men's RS:X 22 15 21 22 7 26 10 14 9 11 18 18 EL 167 17 Ha Jee-min Men's Laser 20 8 26 7 7 10 6 14 10 6 N/A 10 98 7 Park Gun-woo Cho Sung-min Men's 470 17 16 14 15 3 17 15 14 1 9 N/A EL 104 14 M = Medal race; EL = Eliminated – did not advance into the medal race Shooting [ edit ] Main articles: Shooting at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Shooting at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korean shooters achieved quota places for the following events by virtue of their best finishes at the 2018 ISSF World Championships, the 2019 ISSF World Cup series, and Asian Championships, as long as they obtained a minimum qualifying score (MQS) by May 31, 2020.

[113] Fourteen shooters (seven per gender) were selected to the South Korean roster at the end of the national trials, with pistol ace and four-time gold medalist Jin Jong-oh leading them to his fifth consecutive Games and Kim Min-ji setting her historic comeback to the Games for the first time in 13 years. [114] Meanwhile, Nam Tae-yun earned a direct place in the men's 10 m air rifle for the rescheduled Games as the highest-ranked shooter vying for qualification in the ISSF World Olympic Rankings of 6 June 2021.

[115] Men Athlete Event Qualification [116] Final [117] Points Rank Points Rank South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 Dae-yoon 25 m rapid fire pistol 585 3 Q 22 4 Jin Jong-oh 10 m air pistol 576 15 Did not advance Kim Mo-se 579 6 Q 115.8 8 Kim Sang-do 10 m air rifle 625.1 24 Did not advance 50 m rifle 3 positions 1164 24 Did not advance Lee Jong-jun Skeet 121 13 Did not advance Nam Tae-yun 10 m air rifle 627.2 12 Did not advance Song Jong-ho 25 m rapid fire pistol DSQ Did not advance Women Athlete Event Qualification [118] Final [119] Points Rank Points Rank Bae Sang-hee 50 m rifle 3 positions 1164 south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 Did not advance Cho Eun-young 1155 32 Did not advance Choo Ga-eun 10 m air pistol 573 16 Did not advance Kim Bo-mi 570 24 Did not advance Kim Min-jung 25 m pistol 584 8 Q 38 (+1) OR Kwak Jung-hye 579 21 Did not advance Kwon Eun-ji 10 m air rifle 630.9 4 Q 145.4 7 Park Hee-moon 631.7 2 Q 119.1 8 Mixed Athlete Event Qualification 1 [120] Qualification 2 [121] Final / BM [122] Points Rank Points Rank Opposition Result Rank Kim Sang-do Park Hee-moon 10 m air rifle team 623.3 20 Did not advance Nam Tae-yun Kwon Eun-ji 630.5 3 Q 417.5 3 q Kamenskiy / Karimova ( ROC) L 9–17 4 Jin Jong-oh Choo Ga-eun 10 m air pistol team 575 9 Did not advance Kim Mo-se Kim Bo-mi 573 11 Did not advance Sport climbing [ edit ] Main articles: Sport climbing at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Sport climbing at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korea entered two sport climbers into the Olympic tournament.

South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 the IFSC Asian Championships cancelled because of the travel restrictions brought by the COVID-19 pandemic, Chon Jong-won and Seo Chae-hyun received the unused berths respectively, as the continent's highest-ranked male and female sport climber vying for qualification, at the 2019 Worlds in Hachioji, Japan. [123] [124] Athlete Event Qualification Final Speed Boulder Lead Total Rank Speed Boulder Lead Total Rank Best Place Result Place Hold Time Place Best Place Result Place Hold Time Place Chon Jong-won Men's 6.21 5 1T3z 3 10 10 26+ 2:34 16 800.00 10 Did not advance Seo Chae-hyun Women's 10.01 17 2T4z 5 5 5 40+ — 1 85.00 2 Q 9.85 8 0T0z 0 0 7 35+ — 2 112 8 Swimming [ edit ] Main articles: Swimming at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Swimming at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korean swimmers further achieved qualifying standards in the following events (up south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 a maximum of 2 swimmers in each event at the Olympic Qualifying Time (OQT), and potentially 1 at the Olympic Selection Time (OST)): [125] [126] Men Athlete Event Heat [127] Semifinal [128] Final [129] Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Cho Sung-jae 100 m breaststroke 59.99 20 Did not advance 200 m breaststroke 2:10.17 19 Did not advance Hwang Sun-woo 50 m freestyle 22.74 39 Did not advance 100 m freestyle 47.97 6 Q 47.56 AS 4 Q 47.82 5 200 m freestyle 1:44.62 1 Q 1:45.53 6 Q 1:45.26 7 Lee Ho-joon 400 m freestyle 3:53.23 26 N/A Did not advance Lee Ju-ho 100 m backstroke 53.84 =20 Did not advance 200 m backstroke 1:56.77 4 Q 1:56.93 11 Did not advance Moon Seung-woo 100 m butterfly 53.59 47 Did not advance 200 m butterfly 1:58.09 28 Did not advance Hwang Sun-woo Kim Woo-min Lee Ho-joon Lee Yoo-yeon 4 × 200 m freestyle relay 7:15.03 13 N/A Did not advance Women Athlete Event Heat [130] Semifinal [131] Final Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank An Se-hyeon 100 m butterfly 59.32 23 Did not advance Han Da-kyung 400 m freestyle 4:16.49 21 N/A Did not advance 800 m freestyle 8:46.66 28 South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 Did not advance 1500 m freestyle 16:33.59 28 N/A Did not advance Kim Seo-yeong 200 m individual medley 2:11.54 15 Q 2:11.38 12 Did not advance Lee Eun-ji 100 m backstroke 1:00.14 20 Did not advance 200 m backstroke 2:11.72 18 Did not advance An Se-hyeon Han Da-kyung Jung Hyun-young Kim Seo-yeong 4 × 200 m freestyle relay 8:11.16 14 N/A Did not advance Table tennis [ edit ] Main articles: Table tennis at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Table tennis at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korea entered six athletes into the table tennis competition at the Games.

The men's and women's teams secured one of nine available places, respectively, at the 2020 World Olympic Qualification Event in Gondomar, Portugal, permitting a maximum of two starters to compete each in the men's and women's singles tournament. [132] [133] Men Athlete Event Preliminary Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 [134] Round of 16 [135] Quarterfinals [136] Semifinals Final / BM South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Rank Jang Woo-jin Singles Bye Drinkhall ( GBR) W 4–1 Calderano ( BRA) L 3–4 Did not advance Jeoung Young-sik Bye Gionis ( GRE) W 4–3 Boll ( GER) W 4–1 Fan Zd ( CHN) L 0–4 Did not advance Jang Woo-jin Jeoung Young-sik Lee Sang-su Team N/A Slovenia (SLO) W 3–1 Brazil (BRA) W 3–0 China (CHN) L 0–3 Japan (JPN) L 1–3 4 Women Athlete Event Preliminary Round 1 [137] Round 2 [138] Round 3 [139] Round of 16 [140] Quarterfinals [141] Semifinals Final / BM Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Rank South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 Ji-hee Singles Bye Yuan ( FRA) W 4–3 Liu ( AUT) W 4–1 Ito ( JPN) L 0–4 Did not advance Shin Yu-bin Bye Edghill south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 GUY) W 4–0 Ni Xl ( LUX) W 4–3 Doo H K ( HKG) L 2–4 Did not advance Choi Hyo-joo Jeon Ji-hee Shin Yu-bin Team N/A Poland (POL) W 3–0 Germany (GER) L 2–3 Did not advance Mixed Athlete Event Round of 16 [142] Quarterfinals [143] Semifinals Final / BM Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Rank Lee Sang-su Jeon Ji-hee Doubles Assar / Meshref ( EGY) W 4–1 Lin Y-j / Cheng I-c ( TPE) L 2–4 Did not advance Taekwondo [ edit ] Main articles: Taekwondo at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Taekwondo at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korea entered six athletes into the taekwondo competition at the Games.

Jang Jun (men's 58 kg), double Olympic medalist Lee Dae-hoon (men's 68 kg), In Kyo-don (men's +80 kg), and world champions Sim Jae-young (women's 49 kg), Lee Ah-reum (women's 57 kg), and Lee Da-bin (women's +67 kg) qualified directly for their respective weight classes by finishing among the top five taekwondo practitioners at the end of the WT Olympic Rankings. Athlete Event Qualification Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Repechage 1 Repechage 2 Final / BM Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Rank Jang Jun Men's −58 kg N/A Barbosa ( PHI) W 26–6 Vicente ( ESP) W 24–19 Jendoubi ( TUN) L 19–25 N/A Bye Salim ( HUN) W 46–16 PTG Lee Dae-hoon Men's −68 kg Bye Rashitov ( UZB) L 19–21 Did not advance Fofana ( MLI) W 11–9 Hosseini ( IRI) W 30–21 Zhao S ( CHN) L 15–17 =5 In Kyo-don Men's +80 kg N/A Mansouri ( AFG) W 13–12 Zhaparov ( KAZ) W 10–2 Georgievski ( MKD) L 6–12 N/A Bye Trajkovič ( SLO) W 5–4 Sim Jae-young Women's −49 kg Bye El Bouchti ( MAR) W 19–10 Yamada ( JPN) L south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 Did not advance Lee Ah-reum Women's −57 kg Bye Lo C-l ( TPE) L 18–20 Did not advance Lee Da-bin Women's +67 kg N/A Traoré ( CIV) W 17–13 Rodríguez ( DOM) W 23–14 Walkden ( GBR) W 25–24 N/A Bye Mandić ( SRB) L 6–10 Tennis [ edit ] Main articles: Tennis at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Tennis at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korea entered one tennis player into the Olympic tournament, Kwon Soon-woo qualified for the men's singles.

Athlete Event Round of 64 [144] Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final / BM Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Kwon Soon-woo Men's singles Tiafoe ( USA) L 3–6, 2–6 Did not advance Volleyball [ edit ] Main article: Volleyball at the 2020 Summer Olympics Indoor [ edit ] Summary Team Event Group stage Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank Opposition Score Opposition Score Opposition Score Rank South Korea women's Women's tournament Brazil L 0–3 Kenya W 3–0 Dominican Republic W 3–2 Japan W 3–2 Serbia L 0–3 3 Q Turkey W 3–2 Brazil L 0–3 Serbia L 0–3 4 Women's tournament [ edit ] Main article: Volleyball at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament The South Korean women's volleyball team qualified for the Olympics by winning the final match and securing an outright berth at the Asian Olympic Qualification Tournament in Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand.

[145] Team roster The roster was announced on south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 July 2021. [146] Head coach: Stefano Lavarini • v • t • e Pld W L Pts SW SL SR SPW SPL SPR Qualification 1 Brazil 5 5 0 14 15 3 5.000 434 315 1.378 Quarter-finals 2 Serbia 5 4 1 12 13 3 4.333 381 313 1.217 3 South Korea 5 3 2 7 9 10 0.900 374 415 0.901 4 Dominican Republic 5 2 3 8 10 10 1.000 south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 406 1.012 5 Japan (H) 5 1 4 4 6 12 0.500 378 395 0.957 6 Kenya 5 0 5 0 0 15 0.000 242 376 0.644 Source: Tokyo 2020 and FIVB Rules for classification: Tiebreakers (H) Host 25 July 2021 ( 2021-07-25) 21:45 Brazil 3–0 South Korea Ariake Arena, Tokyo Referees: Liu Jiang (CHN), Shin Muranaka (JPN) (25–10, 25–22, 25–19) Results Statistics 27 July 2021 ( 2021-07-27) 21:45 South Korea 3–0 Kenya Ariake Arena, Tokyo Referees: Sumie Myoi (JPN), Evgeny Makshanov (RUS) (25–14, 25–22, 26–24) Results Statistics 29 July 2021 ( 2021-07-29) 11:05 South Korea 3–2 Dominican Republic Ariake Arena, Tokyo Referees: Hernán Casamiquela (ARG), Shin Muranaka (JPN) (25–20, 17–25, 25–18, 15–25, 15–12) Results Statistics 31 July 2021 ( 2021-07-31) 19:40 Japan 2–3 South Korea Ariake Arena, Tokyo Referees: Susana Rodríguez (ESP), South korea olympic games tokyo 2020 Turci (BRA) (19–25, 25–19, 22–25, 25–15, 14–16) Results Statistics 2 August 2021 ( 2021-08-02) 09:00 Serbia 3–0 South Korea Ariake Arena, Tokyo Referees: Evgeny Makshanov (RUS), Sumie Myoi (JPN) (25–18, 25–17, 25–15) Results Statistics Quarterfinal 4 August 2021 ( 2021-08-04) 09:00 South Korea 3–2 Turkey Ariake Arena, Tokyo Referees: Hamid Al-Rousi (UAE), Patricia Rolf (USA) (17–25, 25–17, 28–26, 18–25, 15–13) Results Statistics Semifinal 6 August 2021 ( 2021-08-06) 21:00 Brazil 3–0 South Korea Ariake Arena, Tokyo Referees: Luis Macias (MEX), Denny Cespedes (DOM) (25–16, 25–16, 25–16) Results Statistics Bronze medal game 8 August 2021 ( 2021-08-08) 09:00 South Korea 0–3 Serbia Ariake Arena, Tokyo Referees: Daniele Rapisarda (ITA), Patricia Rolf (USA) (18–25, 15–25, 15–25) Results Statistics Weightlifting [ edit ] Main articles: Weightlifting at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Weightlifting at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korea entered eight weightlifters into the Olympic competition.

Rio 2016 Olympians Won Jeong-sik (men's 73 kg) and Yu Dong-ju (men's 96 kg), Jin Yun-seong (men's 109 kg), Ham Eun-ji (women's 55 kg), Kim Su-hyeon (women's 76 kg), and Lee Seon-mi (women's +87 kg) secured one of the top eight slots each in their respective weight divisions based on the IWF Absolute World Rankings, with Han Myeong-mok and Kang Yeoun-hee topping the field of weightlifters from the Asian zone in the men's 67 kg and women's 87 kg category, respectively, based on the IWF Absolute Continental Rankings.

Won Jeong-sik withdrew from competition prior to the start of south korea olympic games tokyo 2020 event due to an ankle injury. [147] Men Athlete Event Snatch Clean & Jerk Total Rank Result Rank Result Rank Han Myeong-mok −67 kg 147 3 174 4 321 4 [148] Yu Dong-ju −96 kg 160 10 200 8 360 8 [149] Jin Yun-seong −109 kg 180 6 220 6 400 6 [150] Women Athlete Event Snatch Clean & Jerk Total Rank Result Rank Result Rank Ham Eun-ji −55 kg 85 9 116 4 201 7 [151] Kim Su-hyeon −76 kg 106 5 140 DNF 106 DNF [152] Kang Yeoun-hee −87 kg 103 9 128 9 231 9 [153] Lee Seon-mi +87 kg 125 3 152 4 277 4 [154] Wrestling [ edit ] Main articles: Wrestling at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Wrestling at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification South Korea qualified two wrestlers for each of the following weight classes into the Olympic competition; all of whom progressed to the top two finals of the men's Greco-Roman wrestling (67 and 130 kg), respectively, at the 2021 Asian Qualification Tournament in Almaty, Kazakhstan.

[155] Key: • VT (ranking points: 5–0 or 0–5) – Victory by fall. • VB (ranking points: 5–0 or 0–5) – Victory by injury (VF for forfeit, VA for withdrawal or disqualification) • PP (ranking points: 3–1 or 1–3) – Decision by points – the loser with technical points. • PO (ranking points: 3–0 or 0–3) – Decision by points – the loser without technical points. • ST (ranking points: 4–0 or 0–4) – Great superiority – the loser without technical points and a margin of victory of at least 8 (Greco-Roman) or 10 (freestyle) points.

• SP (ranking points: 4–1 or 1–4) – Technical superiority – the loser with technical points and a margin of victory of at least 8 (Greco-Roman) or 10 (freestyle) points. Men's Greco-Roman Athlete Event Qualification Round of 16 [156] Quarterfinal Semifinal Repechage Final / BM Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Opposition Result Rank Ryu Han-su −67 kg Merabet ( ALG) W 4–0 ST El-Sayed ( EGY) L 1–3 PP Did not advance 9 Kim Min-seok −130 kg N/A Mirzazadeh ( IRI) L 0–3 PO Did not advance 14 Politics [ edit ] South Korean politicians took issue with a map of the torch relay on the Games' official website, which depicted the disputed Liancourt Rocks (territory claimed by Japan but governed by South Korea) as part of Japan.

"South Korea, through the Japanese embassy in South Korea, has lodged a protest on the issue," Japan's then cabinet secretary Yoshihide Suga said, "Japan told the South Korean side that the protest is not acceptable given that Japan owns Takeshima and given Japan's position on the Sea of Japan." [157] The South Korean government also called for a ban of the Rising Sun Flag in the Olympic Games, due to being considered to be offensive as a consequence of its usage by the Imperial Japanese military during World War II.

In September 2019, the South Korean parliamentary committee for sports asked the organisers of 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo to ban the Rising Sun Flag. [158] On 8 August 2021, the final day of the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics, the South Korean Olympic Committee announced, "The IOC has declared in a letter that the Rising Sun Flag violates the Olympic Charter. It will be banned at the Olympics." In response, the Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic Games announced on 9 August, "The announcement by the South Korean Olympic Committee is not true.

When we contacted the IOC, we confirmed that the IOC will continue to respond to the issue on a case-by-case basis and will not impose a blanket ban. On the morning of 9 August, the IOC sent a letter to South Korea indicating that the use of the flag will be determined on a case-by-case basis." [159] [160] References [ edit ] • ^ "Jun makes Korean history in pentathlon".

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