When i grow up disney junior

when i grow up disney junior

A year ago, in the first quarter of 2021, streaming penetration was 74%, according to data Nathanson uses from a monthly survey by HarrisX. Nathanson said the growth in penetration came because of increases in subscriptions to newer, smaller services like Peacock and Paramount Plus, while OG streamers like Netflix, Hulu, Disney Plus and Amazon Prime Video were relatively flat as a group. In the quarter those established services appeared to step down the increase in new episodes of original programming.

By contrast, newer services are ramping up with new series on Paramount Plus and the Olympics and Super Bowl on Peacock. Discovery Plus’s growth wasn’t exceptional, but its subscribers’ daily usage was a month the highest in the industry, trailing only Netflix and Hulu. The increase in streaming penetration came from consumers who don’t have a pay TV subscription. Penetration in homes that do have a pay TV subscription was flat.

Nathanson said the shift to streaming will continue to be a problem for legacy media. “We see a problem brewing in the data,” Nathanson said. “When asked why consumers cut the cord and moved to streaming, the issue of ‘Pay TV being too expensive’ may be quickly bypassed by the rationale that ‘all the shows I currently watch are on streaming.‘ “As more linear network owners (e.g., Disney, Comcast, Paramount and now Warner Bros.

Discovery) shift more and more original content to their streaming services they are potentially creating a ‘tragedy of the commons’ moment when all these individual actions end up collectively damaging a common good — in this case, the linear TV bundle,” he said.

■ Jon Lafayette • • Jon has been business editor of Broadcasting+Cable since 2010. When i grow up disney junior focuses on revenue-generating activities, including advertising and distribution, as well as executive intrigue and merger and acquisition activity.

Just about any story is fair game, if a when i grow up disney junior sign can make its way into the article. Before B+C, Jon covered the industry for TVWeek, Cable World, Electronic Media, Advertising Age and The New York Post. A native New Yorker, Jon is hiding in plain sight in the suburbs of Chicago. Broadcasting+Cable is part of Future US Inc, an international media group and leading digital publisher.

Visit our corporate site. • Terms and conditions • Privacy policy • Cookies policy • Accessibility statement • Careers • Advertise with Us • Contact Us © Future US, Inc. Full 7th Floor, 130 West 42nd Street, New York, NY 10036. Disney DVD is the brand name under which Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment releases its Disney-branded content on DVD. In 1997, the home entertainment branches of many entertainment companies began releasing DVD movie titles, as the DVD format was rapidly increasing, as this futuristic innovation began to impress families who had used the VHS format, the number of households equipped with a DVD player began to grow slowly, before blowing up in early 2000.

Disney took notice of the growing popularity of this format, and released a set of DVD titles, billed under the banner, " Limited Issue", which consisted of eight classic Disney animated feature films. However, unlike the future releases the company would soon produce, this line of DVD titles sold poorly, possibly due to their $39.99 price tag, as well as the number of DVD players in American households.

Later on, the DVD format began to pick up steam, as Disney's VHS releases began to be phased out, until Bambi II, Disney's last retail VHS release was released in 2006, although the company continued to release movies on VHS as Disney Movie Club exclusives until the sought-after VHS of the 2006 hit, Cars was released in 2007. Contents • 1 Slogans • 1.1 October 2001–August 2007 • 1.2 August 2004–August 2014 • 2 Logos • 3 See also Slogans October 2001–August 2007 Used the Trailer transition, Intro logo transition titles DVDs Language Original Display English Translation Original Pure Digital Magic Pure Digital Magic French La Magie Du Numérique À L'État Pur The Magic Of Digital In Its Pure State Latin American Spanish/Brazilian Portuguese Pura Magia Digital Pure Digital Magic Castilian Spanish/Lusitanian Portuguese Magia Digital Pura Pure Digital Magic Italian Pura Magia Digitale Pure Digital Magic German Zauber in einer Neuen Dimension Magic in a New Dimension Icelandic Sannkallaðir Töfraheimar True Magic Worlds Russian Настоящее Цифровое Волшебство Pure Digital Magic Czech DigitálnÄ› ÄŒisté Kouzlo Digitally Pure Magic Hungarian 100% Digitális Varászlat 100% Digital Magic Croatian Svijet Digitalne Carolije World Of Digital Magic Slovenian Svet Digitalne Carovnije World of Digital Magic Bulgarian Чиста Дигитална Магия Pure Digital Magic Greek Ψηφιακή Μαγεία Digital Magic Arabic منتعهس متلغق تكنؤكؤ حيا الفيحنتال ببلحر اتبحنؤاؤحبا ارةهنة ذةضى الاستمتاع ىِالتكنؤلؤحبا الرقمية اتبتةتعع تبتعر تكنؤكؤ حيا الفيحنتال We are proud to Have the Best experience in the World and we are proud to Enjoy The Digital Magic Hebrew קסם דיגיטלי מדהים!

Amazing Digital Magic! Korean í™˜ìƒì ì¸ 디지털 세계 Fantastic digital world Thai อัศจรรย์ ดิจิตอล เต็มรูบแบบ Full digital miracle Chinese 数位魅力百分百!

Digital charm 100%! Polish Czysta Cyfrowa Magia Pure Digital Magic August 2004–August 2014 Used the trailers, but on DVD Cover and Intro transition languages have Subtitles with English title instead of transition titles. Language Original Display English Translation Original Movies, Magic & More Movies, Magic & More Logos
Toy Story 3 Source Up is a 2009 American 3-D computer-animated comedy-drama adventure film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and directed by Pete Docter.

It is the tenth animated feature film produced by Pixar. The film centers on an elderly widower named Carl Fredricksen (voiced by Edward Asner) and an earnest young Wilderness Explorer named Russell (Jordan Nagai).

By tying thousands of balloons to his home, 78-year-old Carl sets out to fulfill his lifelong dream to see the wilds of South America and to complete a promise made to his childhood sweetheart and beloved wife, Ellie. The film was co-directed by Bob Peterson, with music composed by Michael Giacchino. It was the second film, after Finding Nemo, to be released in May.

Docter began working on the story in 2004, which was based on fantasies of escaping from life when it becomes too irritating. He and eleven other Pixar artists spent three days in Venezuela gathering research and inspiration.

The designs of the characters were caricatured and stylized considerably, and animators were challenged with creating realistic cloth. The floating house is attached by a varying number between 10-20,000 balloons in the film's sequences. Up was Pixar's first film to be presented in Disney Digital 3-D. Up was released in May 2009 and opened the 2009 Cannes Film Festival, becoming the first animated and 3D film to do so.

The film became a great financial success, accumulating over $731,342,744 in its theatrical release. This made it at the time of its release the 33rd highest-grossing film of all time and the sixth highest-grossing animated film of all time (behind Shrek 2, Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs, Finding Nemo, Shrek the Third, and The Lion King).

Up received critical acclaim, with most reviewers commending the humor and heart of the film. Edward Asner was praised for his portrayal of Carl, and a montage of Carl and his wife Ellie aging together was widely lauded. The film received five Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, making it the second animated film in history to receive such a nomination, following Beauty and the Beast. Contents • 1 Plot • 2 Cast • 3 Development • 4 Music • 5 Animation • 6 Release • 6.1 UPisodes • 6.2 Home media • 7 Reception • 7.1 Critical response • 7.2 Box office • 8 Awards • 9 Video game • 10 Theme park attraction • 11 Real life Up house • 12 Gallery • 13 Videos • 14 Trivia • 15 Allusions • 16 External links Plot At eight years old, Carl Fredricksen was a fan of Charles F.

Muntz, who piloted his own self-made dirigible, " Spirit of Adventure". One day, while running down a sidewalk, pretending to pilot his balloon (a regular blue balloon with the words "Spirit of Adventure" written on the side), Carl hears a voice coming from a dilapidated house.

Curious, Carl enters the house and meets Ellie, a when i grow up disney junior girl and fellow fan of Muntz, and they become close friends almost instantly. Ellie's startling introduction causes Carl to release his balloon, which gets stuck in the attic. With Ellie's encouragement, he tries to get it back by crossing a single wooden plank across the second floor of the house.

However, the wooden plank breaks and Carl ends up breaking his arm. Ellie visits him at his bedroom later that night (returning his balloon to him) and shows Carl her secret Adventure Book.

She also tells Carl of her plans to go to Paradise Falls, the same place Muntz had visited on his recent expedition to capture an exotic creature. Years later, Carl marries Ellie, and they begin rebuilding the old house, making it their home. Ellie becomes a tour guide for a zoo, and Carl becomes a balloon salesman, working side-by-side. They go through many stages of their life together, and after Ellie suffers a miscarriage, and they are told they can't have a child, the couple remembers their childhood dream of visiting Paradise Falls, so they decide to save up some money, but unforeseen events (a tire blows out, Carl breaks his leg, a tree crashes into the house and breaks the roof during a storm) force them to use the money they had been saving.

Carl and Ellie grow old together, working at the zoo selling balloons and giving tours, respectively. While cleaning the house, Carl notices the picture of their house perched at the top of Paradise Falls after tucking the savings jar away and leaving the trip out of mind.

Carl then goes to buy tickets to Paradise Falls (presumably with retirement money). He then takes Ellie on a picnic, bringing the tickets as a surprise for her. While climbing up the hill where they had spent so much time before, Ellie's old age begins to catch up to her, and she stumbles over. Before long, she dies of old age in the hospital. Heartbroken and alone, Carl returns to his house after attending Ellie's funeral. In the present, Carl is old and grumpy.

He still lives in his same old house, which he feels is the thing that's keeping Ellie close to him, but surrounding it is a huge city landscape; new buildings are coming up all around Carl's property. A corporation is trying to move him, which would break what he had promised.

He then ends up in a tussle with a construction worker over his broken mailbox and is forced to move at a retirement home. He then realizes this would be his last chance to fulfill that promise. The next morning, two nurses, A.J. and George, from the Shady Oaks Retirement Village come to pick up Carl. He comes out, but tells the workers that before he leaves, he wants to "say one last goodbye to the old place". They oblige and walk back towards the van. Suddenly, thousands and thousands of balloons appear from behind the house.

The house is ripped from its foundation and carried into the sky. The People in the city look in surprise to see the flying house. Carl proceeds to extend shower curtains and blankets from the side of the house, as rudders. Just when he lies down in his chair after setting his course for South America, he hears a knock at his door; it's Russell, a young Wilderness Explorer who had pestered Carl the day before in an attempt to earn his final merit badge for "assisting the elderly" and become a Senior Wilderness Explorer.

He was looking for a creature named a "snipe" that Carl had made up to get him to leave when he accidentally got caught onto the house as it floated away. Carl lets him come inside, and he starts obnoxiously looking around the house. Carl decides to abort his mission and cut balloons from his fireplace to land the house. However, they enter a fierce thunderstorm, tossing the house through the clouds.

Carl gathered all his belongings, tied them down, and eventually passed out from exhaustion. Russell wakes Carl up to tell him when i grow up disney junior he steered the house and that they were in South America, using a GPS.

Soon after, Russell accidentally tosses said GPS out the window. Carl decides to land the house and try to send Russell home. They go out to the front porch; Carl expects the house to take several hours to reach the ground but soon finds that they are much closer to the ground than he thought. The house suddenly hits the ground, tossing Carl and Russell from the porch.

Carl manages to grab onto a dangling hose to stop the house from floating away, and Russell grabs onto Carl's leg, further weighing the house down. Coated in fog, they are dragged to the edge of a seemingly endless cliff.

Russell pulls Carl and the house back to safety soon after. The fog clears, and Carl begins to look around at the extraordinary landscape. He soon notices the astonishing view of Paradise Falls; they made it. Carl orders Russell to climb up the hose when i grow up disney junior the house and hoist him up.

However, Russell barely makes it up the hose at all, and the option of getting up to the house is thrown out. Carl becomes outraged, but Russell comes up with the bright idea to "walk" the house to when i grow up disney junior falls. Once they're in the jungle, Russell needs a bathroom break. He finds what he thinks are snipe tracks and encounters a giant, chocolate-loving bird. He brings it back to Carl who is absolutely terrified. Though friendly with Russell, the bird is obnoxious towards Carl.

Russell becomes attached and names it Kevin, but Carl just wants to move on. Russell leaves a trail of chocolate for Kevin to follow. Soon, Carl and Russell find themselves in a strange rocky area. Soon, they come across a lone dog with a strange when i grow up disney junior. Carl calls for its owner, but Russell just plays with it. Soon, it begins to speak to them. The dog introduces himself as Dug. He says that the collar (which allows him to speak) was made by his "good and smart" master.

Soon, Kevin comes along and pounces on Dug, who urges Carl and Russell to allow him to take Kevin as his "prisoner". Carl, thinking it's just a "weird trick", urges Russell to come with him and move on. Meanwhile, Alpha, Beta, and Gamma (named after Greek letters) are dogs with collars like Dug are searching for a bird as well; Alpha has a problem with his collar which makes his voice high-pitched (like a chipmunk). It turns out that these dogs sent Dug on a "special mission" to find the bird, just so they could get rid of him.

Realizing they could get in trouble with their master for losing Dug, they start a video transmission with him through their collars. They are shocked to find that Dug has found the bird and has taken it as his prisoner. Dug abruptly cuts off the transmission when Russell comes on the screen. Confused, they use the trackers on their collars to find Dug. As Carl and Russell continue their way through the jungle, Carl ditches Dug and Kevin with a tennis ball and a piece of chocolate, respectively.

Dug and Kevin eventually return with Dug holding the same tennis ball that Carl threw. Night falls, and it begins to rain. Dug and Kevin fall asleep while Russell struggles to build a tent but cannot do it. Russell explains to Carl that he's never been camping before, but his divorced father promised Russell that he would come to his ceremony when he becomes a senior wilderness explorer.

Carl feels bad for treating him so badly, realizing that he had never had an adventure even though he was part of Ellie's "adventure club". Russell makes Carl cross his heart that Kevin can come with them on their adventure.

The rain stops and the clear night sky came into view. He sends Russell to sleep, thinking about all he had been through today. Carl wakes up in the morning to find Kevin gone. Russell and Dug are in panic, but soon they see the bird on the roof of his house with a pile of food. Dug explains that Kevin is collecting food for her babies, which leads Russell to realize that Kevin was a girl the whole time.

Kevin called for her babies, and a faint peeping could be heard. Kevin runs to her babies and leaves. Carl forces Dug and Russell along, leaving the latter depressed. As they're walking, they encounter Alpha, Gamma, and Beta. Dug when i grow up disney junior out that he when i grow up disney junior the bird, and the rest of the dogs force Carl and Russell to come along with Dug to their master.

The dogs bring Carl and Russell to a giant cave. Inside are dozens of dogs, all with special collars. Out from the shadows comes an elderly but fit man. The man apologizes for getting Carl into this situation and gives them a goodbye. After a moment, though, Carl calls to the man again. He discovers that the man, the dogs' master, is actually Charles Muntz. Glad to see a fan of his, Muntz invites Carl and Russell inside the cave, where Muntz's dirigible, the Spirit of Adventure, is stationed.

Carl and Russell park the house beside the cave and enter the dirigible as Dug gets the "Cone of Shame", a giant funnel, put on his head for his wrongdoings. Carl is in awe at all of the treasures that Muntz had collected in the dirigible's trophy room.

Just then, Alpha calls Muntz for dinner; Muntz hears Alpha's voice and fixes the problem with his collar. Carl and Russell are invited to dinner. Before long, they see hundreds of photos, drawings, and information on Kevin around the room. Carl realizes what is happening; Muntz is searching for Kevin; the beast of Paradise Falls.

Russell calls out that they saw the bird, but Carl quickly adds that it ran away. Carl looks out the window to see Kevin in the cave. He rushes Russell out of the dirigible, but the dogs quickly chase after him, understanding why they had suddenly left as Muntz sees Kevin on top of Carl's house. Carl and Russell grab the house and run for their lives.

Dug quickly points out a side cave for Carl and Russell to take. Just when the dogs are about to catch them, Kevin leaps from the roof of the house and scoops up Carl and Russell, helping them run. The balloons on the roof of the house pop as they drag against the stalactites.

The house hits a giant rock and knocks Russell off of Kevin, still hanging onto the harness connected to the house. An avalanche of rocks falls as they make it outside, stopping the dogs. Dug tries to command the dogs to stop chasing them, but Dug is knocked away by Alpha, removing the Cone of Shame.

Soon, Kevin arrives at the edge of a cliff. The house is moving when i grow up disney junior, dragging them off the cliff. Everybody grabs on as they are taken midair. The dogs jump to catch them but fall into a rushing river.

Carl, Russell, and Kevin land on the other side of the canyon, but Alpha bites Kevin, injuring her. Russell begs to stop and help Kevin; Carl looks up to see that the balloons are getting weaker and weaker. Carl reluctantly agrees to stop, remembering his promise to Russell as well. The soaked dogs return to Muntz, who reacts angrily. When the dogs explain that Dug is on Kevin's side, he comes up with the idea to use Dug's tracking device. Meanwhile, Carl and the group think that they're safe.

They decide to continue moving with Kevin on the porch of the house. Russell tells Carl that the wilderness is a lot "wilder" than he thought it would be. He said his dad made it sound easy, going on to say that after their meetings for the Wilderness Explorers, he would bring him to Fenton's Creamery, where they would sit on the curb and count the number of blue and red cars that go by.

He then goes on to say that it was the simple things he remembers the most. Kevin hears her babies cry for help and darts towards them into the cave. When i grow up disney junior, a spotlight falls on Kevin--Muntz's dirigible had followed her. Kevin tries to run, but a net shoots out of the dirigible and catches her. Carl takes Russell's knife and saws at the net. The dogs are getting closer, and they are dragging Carl's house behind them. Muntz yells at them to get away from his bird and scowls evilly and throws a lantern at the house, and sets it afire, the heat destroying some of the balloons.

Carl runs to save the house and stops sawing. Immediately, when i grow up disney junior dogs swarm Kevin; they take her into the dirigible and leave. Russell is upset that Carl practically gave Kevin to Muntz. Carl claims it was none of his concern, never asked for any of the trials and tribulations he was put through, blames Dug for their troubles after Dug tries to cheer him up (Carl even claiming that if it wasn't for him, none of this would have happened), sends him away, and continues straight on to the falls, an upset Russell behind him.

Soon, Carl finally arrives at the falls. He has finally achieved his goal and kept his promise to Ellie but doesn't feel happy. Russell throws his sash on the ground in anger, saying that he doesn't want it anymore. Carl picks up the sash and looks towards the house (at this point, it's barely above the ground). The balloons had weakened severely over the past day or two. Carl goes inside and quietly began to tidy up. The house is a mess; everything is all over the floor.

Carl takes a seat in his chair for a moment. He picks up Ellie's adventure book beside his feet. He flips through the pages, up until the page marked "Stuff I'm Going to Do". Thinking that the pages will simply be blank, Carl goes to shut it but is surprised when he notices a bit of picture on the next page: the pages are not empty. They are filled with pictures of Carl and Ellie's life together.

The final photo is of them, elderly and in their chairs. Below, in the corner, Ellie has written a simple, heartfelt message: “ Thanks for the adventure - now go have a new one!” ―Love Ellie Carl learns that Ellie saw their simple life as her adventure. Carl looks at Russell's sash and crosses his heart. Back outside, Russell grabs a large bunch of balloons and a leaf blower.

He declares that he'll find and free Kevin even if Carl won't help him and flies off. Carl attempts to follow suit, but the balloons' depletion prevents the house from flying any higher. Carl throws a chair off the front porch in frustration. Carl then comes up with an idea. He begins to take all of the objects in his house and throws them out, which causes the house to become lighter. After getting rid of the last object in the house, the house goes airborne again, much to Carl's pride.

Dug (who had hidden under the porch) also comes with Carl, who both agree that Carl is Dug's master. Russell tries to save Kevin, but he is quickly captured by Muntz. He interrogates Russell, who won't reveal anything. Muntz looks out the window to see Carl and the house. He demands the dogs to get rid of Carl if they see him. The floor below Russell starts to lower, sending him down a ramp to nowhere.

Carl catches sight of this and puts on Russell's sash. He steers the house towards the dirigible and jumps to Russell, saving him from death. Russell says to Carl that they should work together to help Kevin, but Carl just wants Russell safe and demands that he stays in the house. Carl and Dug enter the dirigible through an air duct. They discover Kevin, who is locked in a giant cage guarded by fierce dogs.

Carl grabs a tennis ball on the edge of his cane and throws it out the door of the room, leading all the dogs to give chase. Carl locks the door and begins to free Kevin. Meanwhile, Russell leaves the house but falls off the porch. He grabs the garden hose and is dangling for his life. The wind pushes the house towards Muntz's dirigible and knocks Russell against the window of the cockpit. Muntz sees Russell and demands that the dogs take down the house; they get into airplanes and shoot at Russell and the balloons.

Carl, Dug, and Kevin sneak through the corridors of the when i grow up disney junior, looking for a way out. Suddenly, Muntz emerges from the shadows and pulls out a sword. Muntz kicks Dug out of the door and locks it. In front of Dug now are Alpha and the remainder of the pack. Muntz slashes at Carl as he tries to defend himself with his cane. Carl gets knocked to the ground. Carl has an idea; he spits out his false teeth at Muntz, knocking him back.

Carl grabs his teeth and gets back up. Back in the cockpit, Dug is being knocked against the controls, turning the ship. Muntz stumbles in the other room, giving Carl and Kevin an escape chance. They jump out the window and began to climb the airship, with Muntz right behind.

Back in the cockpit, the dog pack traps Dug, who is hiding under the dashboard. As Alpha sticks his head through the steering wheel to reach him, Dug sticks a lampshade over his head, breaking his collar, returning his high-pitched voice, and trapping his head in the steering wheel.

Believing Alpha is now wearing the Cone of Shame, the pack take Dug as their leader and listen to his every command.

Outside, Russell sees Carl and Kevin in trouble. Encouraged, he manages to climb to the porch of the house. Planes continue to attack, but he manages to stop the planes by calling out that he sees a squirrel; this distracts the dogs and makes them collide all of the planes. Meanwhile, Carl and Kevin make it to the top of the dirigible, where Dug joins them. Russell steers to the top of the dirigible; everybody grabs on and steps on the porch.

Muntz reaches the top of the dirigible, now holding a hunting rifle. A bullet rips through the balloon strings with one shot, sending a good amount of them floating away. The house hits the top of the airship, sending Carl tumbling out and the house sliding off the top. Carl grabs onto a hose to try to stop the house from falling. He yells to Russell, Dug, and Kevin to escape the house. Muntz fires at the porch, forcing them to run inside the house.

Muntz jumps onto the front porch and bangs on the front door of the house with his rifle. Carl warns Russell and Dug to hang onto Kevin just as Muntz crashes through the front door. Just before Muntz can shoot the bird, Carl pulls out a chocolate bar, enticing Kevin, who knocks off Muntz's rifle. She jumps through the front window, and Russell's hat falls off of his head, but when Muntz lunges after Kevin, his foot becomes entangled in some balloon lines, and when they break off, Muntz falls to his death thousands of feet below.

Carl manages to save everybody else, but when i grow up disney junior house drifts through the clouds. Carl assures Russell that it's just a house. Sometime later, Carl, Russell, and Dug are with Kevin and her babies. Kevin is now safe. They say their goodbyes and enter Muntz's dirigible. Together, Carl and Russell take off for home.

when i grow up disney junior

The dogs are now happy, not ferocious, as Carl is now their master. Back in the city, the Senior Wilderness Explorer ceremony has finally begun. Russell steps up to the front of the audience. The Campmaster asks for someone to come up for Russell, and Carl has arrived just in when i grow up disney junior. He awards Russell with the grape soda badge that Ellie had given him. The dogs howl with approval. Carl and Russell sit on a curb in front of Fenton's Creamery, licking ice cream cones as the dirigible floats overhead.

They count the red and blue cars that pass by. Soon, they begin to point at things that aren't cars, such as the fire hydrant and a balloon. But nobody minds, as it was just a simple game, something Russell cares for, and something Carl will remember for the rest of his life. The film ends with a shot of Paradise Falls, where it's revealed that Carl's house has landed in the spot overlooking the falls exactly where Ellie pictured it.

Over the credits, Carl has started a new adventure book detailing his life as he settles into retirement while spending lots of time with Russell. Carl moves into Shady Oaks, where the dogs bring happiness to the residents while Carl lives happily with Russell and Dug by his side. Kevin is in South America with her kids. Cast • Edward Asner as Carl Fredricksen (Jeremy Leary voiced Carl as a young child). Docter and Rivera noted Asner's television alter ego, Lou Grant had been helpful in writing for Carl, because it guided them in balancing likable and unlikable aspects of the curmudgeonly character.

When they met Asner and presented him with a model of his character, he joked, "I don't look anything like that." (The appearance of Carl is meant to resemble Spencer Tracy as he appeared in his final film, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?) They tailored his dialogue for him, with short sentences and more consonants, which "cemented the notion that Carl, post-Ellie, is a disgruntled bear that's been poked awake during hibernation".

In Colombia, unexpected publicity for the film was generated due to the uncanny similarity of Carl with Colombian ex-president Julio César Turbay Ayala. • Christopher Plummer as Charles F.

Muntz. Muntz is an old explorer looking for the beast of Paradise Falls; he vowed not to return to North America until he had captured the creature. He uses a group of dogs to aid him in his hunt.

The name of his airship, Spirit of Adventure, may have been inspired by Charles Lindbergh's airplane, Spirit of St. Louis. His name is somewhat of a parody to Charles B. Mintz, the man that was responsible for stealing the rights to Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. In various interviews, Pete Docter has mentioned Howard Hughes and real life adventurers Charles Lindbergh and Percy Fawcett as inspirations for Muntz.

He is the main antagonist of the film. • Jordan Nagai as Russell. On their journey, Russell makes several comments to Carl that suggest that Russell's father and mother are no longer together. Russell's design was based on Pixar animator Peter Sohn. Docter auditioned 400 boys in a nationwide casting call for the part. Nagai, who is Japanese-American, showed up to an audition with his brother, who was actually the one auditioning.

Docter realized Nagai behaved and spoke non-stop like Russell and chose him for the part. Nagai was 8 years old when cast. Docter encouraged Nagai to act physically as well as vocally when recording the role, lifting him upside down and tickling him for the scene where Russell encounters Kevin. Asian Americans have positively noted Pixar's first casting of an Asian lead character, in contrast to the common practice of casting non-Asians in Asian parts. • Bob Peterson as Dug, a Golden Retriever who can talk.

He is the misfit of a pack of talking dogs owned by Muntz. Peterson knew he would voice Dug when he wrote his line "I have just met you, and I love you," which was based on what a child told him when he was a camp counselor in the 1980s. The DVD release of the film features a short called Dug's Special Mission, which follows Dug just prior to his first meeting with Carl and Russell. Dug previously appeared in Ratatouille as a shadow on a wall that barks at Remy.

• Peterson also voices Alpha, a talking Doberman Pinscher and the leader of Muntz's pack of dogs. Pete Docter has stated that Alpha "thinks of himself as Clint Eastwood". Despite his menacing appearance, a frequent malfunction in Alpha's translating collar causes his voice to sound comically high-pitched and squeaky as if he had been breathing helium.

The normal voice for his translator is a resonant, intimidating bass. With both voices, Alpha has a roundabout speech pattern that causes his sentences to be longer than necessary. He is the secondary antagonist of the film. • Pete Docter as Kevin, a large colorful prehistoric bird. Other than voicing Kevin, Docter also voices Campmaster Strauch, Russell's camp master, seen at the end of the film.

• Elizabeth Docter as Ellie Fredricksen as a younger child. The voice actor is the director's daughter, who also provided some of the drawings shown by Ellie. • Delroy Lindo as Beta, a Rottweiler and one of Muntz's dogs. • Jerome Ranft as Gamma, a Bulldog and one of Muntz's dogs. • John Ratzenberger as Tom, a construction worker who asks if Carl is ready to sell his house.

• David Kaye as the newsreel announcer. Development Writing for Up first began in 2004 by director Pete Docter. The fantasy of a flying house was developed on the idea of escaping from life when it becomes too irritating, which stemmed from his when i grow up disney junior with social situations growing up. Actor and writer Thomas McCarthy aided Docter and Bob Peterson in shaping the story for about three months. Docter selected an old man for the main character after drawing a picture of a grumpy old man with smiling balloons.

The two men thought an old man was a good idea for a protagonist because they felt their experiences and the way they affect their view of the world was a rich source of humor. Docter was not concerned with an elderly protagonist, stating children would relate to Carl in the way they relate to their grandparents. Docter noted the film reflects his friendships with Disney veterans Frank Thomas, Ollie Johnston, and Joe Grant (who all died before the film's release and thus the film was dedicated to them).

Grant gave the script his approval as well as some advice before his death in 2005. Docter recalled Grant would remind him the audience needed an "emotional bedrock" because of how wacky the adventure would become; in this case, it is Carl mourning for his wife. Docter felt Grant's personality influenced Carl's deceased wife Ellie more than the grouchy main character, and Carl was primarily based on Spencer Tracy, Walter Matthau, James Whitmore, and their own grandparents, because there was "something sweet about these grumpy old guys".

Docter and Jonas Rivera noted Carl's charming nature in spite of his grumpiness derives from the elderly "hav[ing] this charm and almost this 'old man license' to say things that other people couldn't get away with [.] It's like how we would go to eat with Joe Grant and he would call the waitresses 'honey'. I wish I could call a waitress 'honey'." Docter revealed that the filmmakers' first story outline had Carl "just want[ing] to join his wife up in the sky.

It was almost a kind of strange suicide mission or something. And obviously, that's [a problem]. Once he gets airborne, then what? So we had to have some goal for him to achieve that he had not yet gotten." As a result, they added the plot of going to South America.

The location was chosen due to both Docter's love of tropical locations, but also in wanting a location that Carl could be stuck with a kid due to the inability to leave him with an authority such as a when i grow up disney junior officer or social worker.

They when i grow up disney junior a child character as a way to help Carl stop being "stuck in his ways". Docter created Dug as he felt it would be refreshing to show what a dog thinks, rather than what people assume it thinks. Knowledge of canine communication, body language and pack behaviors for the artists and animators to portray such thoughts came from consultant Dr.

Ian Dunbar, veterinarian, dog behaviorist and trainer. The idea for Alpha's voice derived from thinking about what would happen if someone broke a record player and it always played at a high pitch. Russell was added to the story at a later date than Dug and Kevin; his presence, as well as the construction workers, helped to make the story feel less "episodic". Carl's relationship with Russell reflects how "he's not really ready for the whirlwind that a kid is, as few of us are".

Docter added he saw Up as a "coming of age" tale and an "unfinished love story", with Carl still dealing with the loss of his wife. He cited inspiration from Casablanca and A Christmas Carol, which are both "resurrection" stories about men who lose something and regain purpose during their journey.

Docter and Rivera cited inspiration from the Muppets, Hayao Miyazaki, Dumbo, and Peter Pan. They also saw parallels to The Wizard of Oz and tried to make Up not feel too similar. There is a scene where Carl and Russell haul the floating house through the jungle. A Pixar employee compared the scene to Fitzcarraldo, and Docter watched that film and The Mission for further inspiration. The character Charles Muntz comes from Howard Hughes and Errol Flynn.

Music Main article: Up (soundtrack) Up is the third Pixar film to be scored by Michael Giacchino, after The Incredibles and Ratatouille. What Pete Docter wanted more importantly out of the music was the emotion, so Giacchino wrote a character theme-based score that producer Jonas Rivera thought enhanced the story.

At the beginning of the movie, when young Carl is in the movie theater watching a newsreel about Muntz, the first piece of music heard is "Muntz's Theme", which starts out as a celebratory theme, and echoes through the film when Muntz reappears 70 years later.

"Ellie's Theme" is first heard when she is introduced when i grow up disney junior a little kid and plays several times during the film in different versions; for instance, during the sequence where Carl lifts his house with the balloons, the theme is changed from a simple piano melody to a full orchestral arrangement. Giacchino has compared the film to opera since each character has a unique theme that changes during a particular moment in the story.

The score was released as a digital download on May 26, 2009, three days before the film opened in theaters. It won the Academy Award for Best Original Score, the Grammy Award for Best Score Soundtrack Album, the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Score, and the 2010 BAFTA Award for Best Film Music.

It is the first score for a Pixar film to win the Oscar ( Randy Newman also won for Monsters, Inc. and Toy Story 3, but in the category of Best Original Song). Animation Docter made Venezuela the film's setting after Ralph Eggleston gave him a video of the tepui mountains; Venezuela and tepuis were already featured in a previous Disney film, Dinosaur.

In 2004, Docter and eleven other Pixar artists spent three days reaching Monte Roraima by airplane, jeep, and helicopter. They spent three nights there painting and sketching and encountering ants, mosquitoes, scorpions, frogs, and snakes.

They also flew to Matawi Tepui and climbed to Angel Falls. Docter felt "we couldn't use [the rocks and plants we saw]. Reality is so far out if we put it in the movie you wouldn't believe it." The film's creatures were also challenging to design because they had to fit in the surreal environment of the tepuis, but also be realistic because those mountains exist in real life. The filmmakers visited Sacramento Zoo to observe a Himalayan Monal for Kevin's animation.

The animators designed Russell as an Asian-American, and modeled Russell after similar looking Peter Sohn, a Pixar storyboarder who voiced Emile in Ratatouille and directed the short Partly Cloudy, because of his energetic nature. While Pixar usually designs their characters to be caricatured, Carl was even more so, being only three heads high.

He was not given elderly features such as liver spots or hair in his ears to keep him appealing, yet giving him wrinkles, pockmarks on his nose, a hearing aid, and a cane to make him appear elderly. Docter wanted to push a stylized feel, particularly the way Carl's head is proportioned: he has a squarish appearance to symbolize his containment within his house, while Russell is rounded like a balloon.

The challenge on Up was making these stylized characters feel natural, although Docter when i grow up disney junior the effect came across better than animating the realistic humans from Toy Story, who suffered from the "uncanny valley". Cartoonists Al Hirschfeld, Hank Ketcham, and George Booth influenced the human designs. Simulating realistic cloth on caricatured humans was harder than creating the 10,000 balloons flying the house. New programs were made to simulate the cloth and for Kevin's iridescent feathers.

To animate old people, Pixar animators would study their own parents or grandparents and also watched footage of the Senior Olympics. The directors had various rules for Carl's movements: he could not turn his head more than 15–20 degrees without turning his torso as well, nor could he raise his arms very high. However, they also wanted him to grow more flexible near the end of the film, transforming into an "action hero".

A technical director worked out that in order to make Carl's house fly, he would require 23 million balloons, but Docter realized that number made the balloons look like small dots. Instead, the balloons created were made to be twice Carl's size. There are 10,297 balloons for shots of the house just flying, 20,622 balloons for the lift-off sequence, and a varying number of other scenes.

Release Aflac promoted Up on Carl Edwards' #99 Ford Fusion at the 2009 Southern 500 race May 9th, 2009. When the film screened at the El Capitan Theatre in Hollywood, California from May 29 to July 23, 2009, it was accompanied by Lighten Up!, a live show featuring Disney characters. Other tie-ins included children's books such as My Name is Dug, illustrated by screenwriter Ronnie del Carmen.

Despite Pixar's track record, Target Corporation, and Walmart stocked few Up merchandise, while Pixar's regular collaborator Thinkway Toys did not produce merchandise, claiming its story is unusual and would be hard to promote.

Disney acknowledged not every Pixar film would have to become a franchise. Promotional partners include Aflac, NASCAR, and Airship Ventures, while Cluster Balloons promoted the film with a replica of Carl's couch lifted by hot air balloons for journalists to sit in. In order to promote the film, Disney publicists tied balloons to the home of Edith Macefield in Seattle. Edith's decision to turn down an offer of $1m for her $120,000 home, which sat in the middle of a high-rise development.

Director Pete Docter intended for audiences to take a specific point from the film, saying: “ Basically, the message of the film is that the real adventure of life is the relationship we have with other people, and it's so easy to lose sight of the things we have and the people that are around us until they are gone. More often than not, I don't really realize how lucky I was to have known someone until they're either moved or passed away.

So, if you can kind of wake up a little bit and go, "Wow, I've got some really cool stuff around me every day", then that's what the movie's about.” ―{{{2}}} UPisodes Prior to its theatrical release, Disney Pixar created three small animated vignettes called UPisodes to promote its film UP on the internet.

These UPisodes chronicled Carl Fredricksen and Russell's journey through the jungle, when i grow up disney junior seen in the movie. Fans were able to view the vignettes on Apple iTunes movie trailer site and YouTube. • UPisode One: Animal Calls - in the first episode, Russell demonstrates his ability to mimic animal calls.

• UPisode Two: First Aid - in the second episode, Russell tries to relieve a minor injury that Carl received. • UPisode Three: Snipe Trap - in the third episode, Russell attempts to capture the elusive snipe. Home media Main article: Up (video) Up was released on Blu-ray Disc and DVD in North America on November 10, 2009, and in the United Kingdom on February 15, 2010. It features the film plus the theatrical short Partly Cloudy and the new short Dug's Special Mission, as well as an audio commentary by director Pete Docter, the documentary Adventure is Out There on the filmmakers' research journey to South America, The Many Endings of Muntz (an alternate ending of sorts), and a digital copy.

The Blu-ray edition has a four-disc pack that adds Cine-Explore with BonusView, Global Guardian Badge and Geography games, eight documentaries, and BD-Live to the Deluxe DVD and digital copy platters. A Limited Edition is also available called the Luxo Jr. Premium Pack that includes a collectible lamp modeled after Pixar's bouncy short star that is designed to hold a complete Pixar Blu-ray collection.

In addition, Pixar also created a short film titled George & A.J., when i grow up disney junior and directed by Up storyboard artist Josh Cooley, that shows what the two Shady Oaks retirement home workers did after Carl left with his house.

It was initially available for purchase at the iTunes Store and then was later posted to Disney·Pixar's Facebook and YouTube pages. In its first week it sold 3,969,792 units ($66,057,339). It eventually reached 10,811,453 units ($182,591,149), becoming the best-selling DVD among those released in 2009, in terms of units sold.

It also became the third in terms of sales revenue behind Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen and Twilight. The rental release of the film to Netflix, Blockbuster, and Redbox was controversial since it failed to include closed captioning.

Disney faced a consumer backlash over this and quickly released a statement that this removal was an unfortunate error and that it was moving to correct the issue. Reception Critical response Since its release, Up has widely received acclaim.

Rotten Tomatoes reports that 98% of critics have given the film a "Certified Fresh" positive review, based on 285 reviews, with an 8.7/10 review average. The site's consensus states: "An exciting, funny, and poignant adventure, Up offers an impeccably crafted story told with wit and arranged with depth, as well as yet another visual Pixar treat." The film also holds a score of 88 on the review aggregator website Metacritic as of September 15, 2012.

Audiences gave the film an "A+" CinemaScore. When i grow up disney junior critic Roger Ebert gave the film four out of four stars and called it "a wonderful film". The Hollywood Reporter lauded the film as "Winsome, touching and arguably the funniest Pixar effort ever, this gorgeously rendered, high-flying adventure when i grow up disney junior a tidy 90-minute distillation of all the signature touches that came before it." Although the San Francisco Chronicle noted that the film "contains many boring stretches of mindless freneticism and bland character interaction," it also declared that there are scenes in Up of "Such beauty, economy and poetic wisdom that they belong in any anthology of great movie moments.to watch Up with any when i grow up disney junior is to be moved and astonished by the economy with which specific visuals are invested with emotion throughout [the film]." Variety enthused that " Up is an exceptionally refined picture; unlike so many animated films, when i grow up disney junior not all about sensory bombardment and volume.Unsurprisingly, no one puts a foot wrong here.

Vocal performances.exude a warm enthusiasm, and tech specifications could not be better. Michel Giacchino's full-bodied, traditional score is superlative." The Globe claimed that Up! is "the kind of movie that leaves you asking 'How do people come up [with] this stuff?'" along with an overall positive review on the film, despite it being predictable. The character of Carl Fredricksen has received mostly positive reception.

Bill Capodagli, author when i grow up disney junior Innovate the Pixar Way, praised Carl for his ability to be a jerk and likable at the same time. Wall Street Journal editor Joe Morgenstern described Carl as gruff, comparing him to Buster Keaton, but adds that this begins to wear thin as the movie progresses.

He has been compared with Spencer Tracy, an influence on the character, by The Washington Post editor Ann Hornaday and Empire Online editor Ian Freer, who describes him as similar to a " Guess Who's Coming to Dinner-era" Tracy. Entertainment Weekly editor Lisa Schwarzbaum described his appearance as a cross between Tracy and an eccentric out of a George Booth cartoon.

TIME editor Richard Corliss also makes the comparison, calling him a "trash compacted version" of Tracy. He has also been compared to Walter Matthau, another inspiration for the character's design, by LA Weekly editor Scott Foundas, suggesting that actor Ed Asner was channeling him while performing the role of Carl. Variety editor Todd McCarthy described Carl as a combination of both Tracy and Matthau.

The relationship between Carl and his wife Ellie has been praised in several media outlets. In his book Disney, Pixar, and the Hidden Message of Children's Films, author M. Keith Booker described the love between Carl and Ellie as touching.

While also describing the scene of the two of them aging as a "masterpiece of its own kind", he was not sure how much children would appreciate the scene, commenting that his son was squirming in his seat during the scene.

Reelviews editor James Berardinelli praised their relationship, stating that it brought a tear to his eye in a way no animated film has done, including anything by famed anime director Hayao Miyazaki. Ann Hornaday praised the prolog, describing it as "worthy of Chaplin in its heartbreaking poignancy". Chicago Tribune editor Michael Phillips praised the scene, describing it as an emotional and cinematic powerhouse, and that he also was nearly moved to tears.

However, Salon.com editor Stephanie Zacharek criticized the love between Carl and Ellie, describing their marriage as resembling a dental adhesive commercial more than a real relationship. Edward Asner was praised in several media outlets for his portrayal of Carl. San Francisco Chronicle editor Mick LaSelle praised Asner as a great choice due to having a grumpiness to his voice that is not truly grumpy, but rather coming from a protective stance.

Entertainment Weekly editor Lisa Schwarzbaum praised Asner's acting, stating that he has a "Lou Grant authority" to his voice. Time editor Richard Corliss stated that Asner had the "gruffness and deadpan comic timing to bring Carl to life". The Boston Globe editor Ty Burr concurred with this, stating that his Lou Grant-like voice had not diminished with time.

USA Today editor Claudia Puig praised Asner's delivery, describing it as superb. Box office Up earned $293,004,164 in the United States and Canada and $438,338,580 in other territories for a worldwide total of $731,342,744.

In the United States and Canada, Up is the forty-seventh highest-grossing film, the tenth highest-grossing Disney film, the seventh highest-grossing 3–D film, the sixth highest-grossing animated film, and the third highest-grossing Pixar film. On its opening weekend, it performed stronger than analysts had been expecting, ranking number one with $68,108,790.

This is the fourth highest-grossing opening for Pixar and the third-largest post-Memorial Day opening. It set a record for opening-weekend grosses originating from 3–D showings with $35.4 million (first surpassed by Avatar).The opening-weekend audience was 53% female and 47% under 17 years old. The film experienced small drop-offs on subsequent weekends, but lost first place to The Hangover. Outside the US and Canada, it is the fifty-first highest-grossing film, the tenth highest-grossing animated film, the fifth highest-grossing 2009 film and the third highest-grossing Pixar film.

It was on top of the overseas box office for three consecutive weekends and four in total. Its highest-grossing opening weekends were recorded in France and the Maghreb region ($8.88 million), the UK, Ireland, and Malta, ($8.44 million) and Japan ($7.24 million).

These three were also its highest-grossing countries in total earnings. Among major countries, it was the highest-grossing animated film of 2009 only in Spain ($37.1 million) and Australia ($25.3 million). Awards The film was the winner of Best Animated Feature at the 2010 Golden Globes, the 37th Annie Awards, and the 82nd Academy Awards.

Up also became the second animated film (as well as the first CGI film) to be nominated for the prestigious Best Picture Oscar, but lost to Iraq war thriller The Hurt Locker. Other notable nominees included James Cameron's Avatar, which had overtaken Cameron's own Titanic to become the highest grossing film of all time, Inglourious Basterds, the latest from Pulp Fiction helmer Quentin Tarantino, District 9, a sci-fi alien film that made points about immigration, Up in the Air, the latest assemble romcom from Juno helmer Jason Reitman, and The Blind Side, a triumph over adversity movie with parallels to Forrest Gump.

In addition, Michael Giacchino took home the Oscar for Best Original Score beating out James Horner's score for Avatar and Hans Zimmer's score for Sherlock Holmes. Up won two awards at the 82nd Academy Awards, for "Best Animated Feature" and "Academy Award for Best Original Score" which makes it the first time that a Pixar film won more Oscars than one since The Incredibles as well as being the first time that an animated film won for "Best Score" since Pocahontas (film).

It is the second of three animated features to have been nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. Beauty and the Beast and Toy Story 3 were also nominated for Best Picture in their respective years. 'Up' also won "Best Original Score", and "Best Animated Feature Film" at the 67th Golden Globe Awards. It was nominated for nine Annie Awards in eight categories, winning two awards for "Best Animated Feature" and "Best Directing in a Feature Production".

Up also received the "Golden Tomato" from Rotten Tomatoes for highest rating feature in 2009, and best reviewed animated film. with an approval of 98percent from film critics, based on 259 reviews. At the 2010 Kids' Choice Awards the film won "Favorite Animated Movie". Dug, the talking canine, was awarded the Palm Dog Award by the British film critics as the best canine performance at Cannes Film Festival, winning over the fox from Antichrist.

Video game • A video game, Kinect Rush: A Disney Pixar Adventure, was released on March when i grow up disney junior, 2012, for Xbox 360.

It features characters from five of Pixar's films: Up, The Incredibles, Cars, Ratatouille, and Toy Story. • There is also an "Up" game that was released in May 2009. • In Disney Infinity, Carl's house and cane are usable objects.

Theme park attraction • For a short time you could meet Carl, Russell, and Dug, three characters from the film at Disney's Hollywood Studios at the Walt Disney World Resort.

Their meeting location was in the Magic of Disney Animation Character Spot. Their former location currently houses Winnie the Pooh's Meet and Greet area. Since then, Russell and Dug have been moved to Animal Kingdom in Discovery Island. The stars of Up also star in the new Pixar Pals Countdown to Fun Parade at Disney's Hollywood Studios.

• Russell and Dug are also part of the When i grow up disney junior Creek Challenge Trail where guest take part in a fun-filled challenge to earn a Wilderness Explorer Badge and to take part in the Senior Wilderness Explorer Ceremony at Grizzly Peak in Disney's California Adventure theme park. • A scene from Up featuring Carl and Russell and a voice over commentary by Dug is shown as part of DCA's World of Color nighttime spectacular.

• Up is featured in the Magic Kingdom nighttime spectacular Celebrate the Magic. Real life Up house Seems that you can make the houses from Disney films real after all. In 2011, Bangerter Homes re-created the house (reportedly with permission when i grow up disney junior Disney on the condition that the plans be turned over once completed, and that it is the only house from the film to be built) at 13218 Herriman Rose Blvd.

in Herriman, Utah, as part of the Salt Lake area Parade of Homes, later a private home residence. Gallery The Egg - Up - Disney•Pixar-2 Trivia • This film marks the final Pixar film to use the THQ 2000 logo.

• This film marks the first Pixar film to be produced in a 1.85:1 aspect ratio since Finding Nemo. • This film marks the first Pixar film to feature the Luxo Ball since The Incredibles. • Pixar Animation Studios' 10th film. • This film marks the first Pixar film to feature in 3D. • This film marks the final original full-length feature film Pixar film of the 2000s. • This film marks the third Pixar film to be compose by Michael Giacchino, after The Incredibles and Ratatouille.

• This film marks the first Pixar film to be released in May since Finding Nemo. • This film marks the second Pixar film where a protagonist loses a love interest, after Finding When i grow up disney junior. • This film marks the second Pixar film where a protagonist breaks the law, after Cars. • This film marks the third Pixar film to feature blood, after Finding Nemo and The Incredibles. • Charles Muntz's airship resembles the Hindenburg.

• This film marks the third Pixar film where a character uses a firearm, after The Incredibles and Ratatouille. Allusions • As Carl's House is lifted into the air, a little girl is shown in her room looking at the balloons. Under her bed, Lotso alongside Pixar Ball can be seen. • The Pizza Planet truck can be seen three times.

• 1. As the house is being lifted. • 2. Driving into a parking lot in Carl's idea to return Russell home. • 3. It is seen in the parking lot next to the ice cream shop at the end of the movie. • A113 appears while Carl is sitting outside of the courtroom above him. • During the end credits, a photo of Carl and Russell going to the movies is seen. The title of the movie reads: Star Wars.

• When the dogs fall off the cliff during the chase scene, one of them emits the Wilhelm scream. • Strangely enough, for Disney and Pixar, one of the residents who looks up at Carl's house resembles Steve from the Nick Jr series, Blues Clues. • The main protagonist injures a public worker and feels guilty after doing so. In The Incredibles, the main protagonist also injures a public worker and also feels guilty after doing so.

when i grow up disney junior

This makes Up the second Pixar film to feature the main protagonist injuring a public worker and feeling guilty after doing so, with the first being The Incredibles. External links • Up on Wikipedia • Up on Pixar Wiki • Up on Disney.com • Up on IMDb v - e - d Media Films: Up ( video/ soundtrack) • Dug's Special Mission • George and A.J. Series: Dug Days Books: Little Golden Book • The Art of Up Games: Up • Kinect Rush: A Disney/Pixar Adventure • Disney Infinity • Disney Emoji Blitz • LEGO The Incredibles • Disney Heroes: Battle Mode Disney Parks Disney's Explorers Lodge • Disney Animation Building • Disney Friends of the Month • Karibuni Marketplace • Pixar Pal-A-Round • Redwood Creek Challenge Trail • Wilderness Explorers (Animal Kingdom) • Stitch and Friends Summer Surprise Entertainment: Pixar Playtime Pals • UP!

A Great Bird Adventure Parade: Pixar Play Parade • Pixar Water Play Street Party! Firework: Cherish the Memories • Ignite the Dream: A Nighttime Spectacular of Magic and Light • ILLUMINATE! A Nighttime Celebration • Momentous • Together Forever: A Pixar Nighttime Spectacular • World of Color Characters Carl Fredricksen • Ellie Fredricksen • Russell • Charles F.

Muntz • Kevin • Dug • Alpha • Beta and Gamma • Kevin's Babies • Construction Foreman Tom • Construction Worker Steve • Construction Supervisor • George • A.J. • Russell's Mother • Puppies Locations Carl's Childhood Home • Carl's House • Paradise Falls • Shady Oaks Retirement Village • Spirit of Adventure • South America Objects Pixar Ball • A113 • Pizza Planet Truck Songs Married Life • The Spirit of Adventure See Also The Science Behind Pixar • Pixar in a Box • Wilderness Explorers v - e - d Walt Disney Animation Studios Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) • Pinocchio (1940) • Fantasia (1940) • Dumbo (1941) • Bambi (1942) • Saludos Amigos (1942) • The Three Caballeros (1944) • Make Mine Music (1946) • Fun and Fancy Free (1947) • Melody Time (1948) • The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr.

Toad (1949) • Cinderella (1950) • Alice in Wonderland (1951) • Peter Pan (1953) • Lady and the Tramp (1955) • Sleeping Beauty (1959) • One Hundred and One Dalmatians (1961) • The Sword in the Stone (1963) • The Jungle Book (1967) • The Aristocats (1970) • Robin Hood (1973) • The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh (1977) • The Rescuers (1977) • The Fox and the Hound (1981) • The Black Cauldron (1985) • The Great Mouse Detective (1986) • Oliver & Company (1988) • The Little Mermaid (1989) • The Rescuers Down Under (1990) • Beauty and the Beast (1991) • Aladdin (1992) • The Lion King (1994) • Pocahontas (1995) • The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996) • Hercules (1997) • Mulan (1998) • Tarzan (1999) • Fantasia 2000 (1999) • Dinosaur (2000) • The Emperor's New Groove (2000) • Atlantis: The Lost Empire (2001) • Lilo & Stitch (2002) • Treasure Planet (2002) • Brother Bear (2003) • Home on the Range (2004) • Chicken Little (2005) • Meet the Robinsons (2007) • Bolt (2008) • The Princess and the Frog (2009) • Tangled (2010) • Winnie the Pooh (2011) • Wreck-It Ralph (2012) · Frozen (2013) • Big Hero 6 (2014) • Zootopia (2016) • Moana (2016) • Ralph Breaks the Internet (2018) • Frozen II (2019) • Raya and the Last Dragon (2021) • Encanto (2021) Upcoming: Strange World (2022) Pixar Toy Story (1995) • A Bug's Life (1998) • Toy Story 2 (1999) · Monsters, Inc.

(2001) • Finding Nemo (2003) • The Incredibles (2004) • Cars (2006) • Ratatouille (2007) • WALL-E (2008) • Up (2009) • Toy Story 3 (2010) • Cars 2 (2011) • Brave (2012) • Monsters University (2013) • Inside Out (2015) • The Good Dinosaur (2015) • Finding Dory (2016).

Cars 3 (2017) • Coco (2017) • Incredibles 2 (2018) • Toy Story 4 (2019) • Onward (2020) • Soul (2020) • Luca (2021) • Turning Red (2022) Upcoming: Lightyear (2022) • Lulu (2023) Disneytoon Studios DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp (1990) • A Goofy Movie (1995) • The Tigger Movie (2000) · Peter Pan: Return to Never Land (2002) • The Jungle Book 2 (2003) • Piglet's Big Movie (2003) Pooh's Heffalump Movie (2005) • Tinker Bell (2008) • Tinker Bell and the Lost Treasure (2009) • Tinker Bell and the Great Fairy Rescue (2010) • Secret of the Wings (2012) • Planes (2013) • The Pirate Fairy (2014) • Planes: Fire & Rescue (2014) • Tinker Bell and the Legend of the NeverBeast (2015) Disney Television Animation Doug's 1st Movie (1999) • Recess: School's Out (2001) • Teacher's Pet (2004) ImageMovers Digital A Christmas Carol (2009) • Mars Needs Moms (2011) Films with Stop Motion Animation The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) • James and the Giant Peach (1996) • Frankenweenie (2012) Live-Action Films with Non-CG Animation The Reluctant Dragon (1941) • Victory Through Air Power (1943) • Song of the South (1946) • So Dear to My Heart (1949) • Mary Poppins (1964) • Bedknobs and Broomsticks (1971) • Pete's Dragon (1977) • Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) • The Lizzie McGuire Movie (2003) • Enchanted (2007) • Mary Poppins Returns (2018) The Disney Channel, which launched in 1983, Disney XD, which began in 2009, Disney Junior, which launched in 2011, and shows on Disney+, along with the short-lived Toon Disney, have all occasionally featured lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender ( LGBT) characters in their programming.

From 1983 onward, Disney struggled with LGBTQ representation in their animated series, and their content often included LGBT stereotypes, like queer-coded characters in the films Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, and Mulan [1] [2] or the content was when i grow up disney junior in series such as Blazing Dragons. [3] Some reviewers have argued that when Disney and Cartoon Network are compared in terms of such representation, it is "easy to see who actually cares about LGBT representation." [4] Some creators have also criticized Disney studio executives of cutting LGBTQ scenes from their shows in the past, [5] [6] or criticized that their shows were not seen as part of the "Disney brand." [7] In later years, there were efforts to ameliorate this, with series like The Owl House which featured a bisexual protagonist, Luz Noceda and various other LGBTQ characters.

[8] [9] Other such characters were depicted in DuckTales and other series. [10] Contents • 1 1980s and 1990s • 2 2000s • 3 2010s • 4 2020s • 5 Criticism and expanded representation • 6 See also • 7 References • 7.1 Citations • 7.2 Further reading 1980s and 1990s [ edit ] Gender has always been a component of animation, with scholars Harry Benshoff and Sean Griffin writing that animation has always "hint[ed] at the performative nature of gender." [11] Some argued that the Walt Disney Company played with gender stereotypes in the past, [12] featuring effeminate or " sissy" characters, [13] or those coded as gay, [14] which occurred while the characters were comedic and kept at arms length.

Continuing from the late 1980s, villains in Disney films which were queer coded began to appear. [2] Gaston and LeFou in the 1991 film Beauty and the Beast and Jafar from the 1992 film Aladdin were created by an openly gay animator named Andreas Deja, [1] and sang music by When i grow up disney junior Ashman, who was also openly gay.

Deja supervised animation for those characters, with some noting the campy value of these characters. [15] The fact that Deja had also worked on Scar in The Lion King and the titular character in Hercules, for example, has been discussed as an influence on the development of some Disney characters. [16] [17] In a June 1994 article in The Advocate, an executive producer of The Lion King, Thomas Schumacher, a gay man, argued that there were "a lot of gay people at every level" of Disney, and called it a "very supportive environment".

He noted that he brought his partner, Matt White, to an annual company beach party and long company retreats and that while some executives were "uncomfortable" with Schumacher bringing his partner, higher executives didn't give him any "trouble." Schumacher also said that while he regretted handing over reins of the film to Don Hahn, he was proud of songs by Tom Rice, a lyricist, and Elton John in the film.

The Advocate noted that even if there aren't any openly gay or lesbian characters in the film, there is "sensitivity" to LGBTQ issues in the "upper echelon" of Disney.

[18] This queer coding had its disadvantages, with networks not wanting to show overt representation. Rebecca Sugar argued that it is "really heavy" for a kid to only exist "as a villain when i grow up disney junior a joke" in an animated series. [2] In 2011, Deja told news.com.au Disney would have a "family that has two dads or two mums" if they find the "right kind of story with that kind of concept." [19] However, other critics criticized such queer-coded villains as contributing to "homophobic discourse" and equating queerness with evil itself.

[20] [21] Historian Peter C. Kunze argued that Ashman was recruited by Disney from Broadway, saying that while working with Alan Menken, he crafted songs in The Little Mermaid (1989), “Beauty and the Beast” and “Aladdin.” Kunze noted that Ashman and animators on The Little Mermaid were inspired by gay culture and gay icons. He also pointed out that Ashman was supported by Jeffrey Katzenberg after coming out as HIV-Positive, with the company even creating a production unit near his home so he could receive treatment in New York City rather than traveling to Burbank, California, before his death in 1991, with Beauty and the Beast dedicated to him.

Kunze further noted that Albert Tavares, a gay man, oversaw casting on The Little Mermaid. [15] A show created by Terry Jones and Gavin Scott, Blazing Dragons, aired on Teletoon in Canada, Spacetoon in Arab countries, and Canal+ in France from 1996 to 1998.

In the series, Sir Blaze is a member of the Square Table, and is flamboyant and effeminate. Throughout the series, he is implied to be gay. His implicit homosexuality was censored when the series aired on Toon Disney in the United States.

[3] BD Wong, in New York City in 2008. He is openly gay. In June 1998, Mulan, an animated musical adventure film would begin showing in theaters. The film would include a bisexual captain When i grow up disney junior Shang (voiced by BD Wong).

Shang, in the film, loved Mulan when she was disguised as a male alter ego named Ping, and in her true form as a woman. [22] However, Shang was not included in the 2020 live-action remake. One of the film's producers said that Shang was dropped in response to the Me Too movement, arguing that "having a commanding officer that is also the sexual love interest was very uncomfortable and we didn't think it was appropriate".

[23] This was met with social media backlash from fans of the original film and members of the LGBTQ community, with Reed initially surprised by criticism of Shang's removal, but acknowledged that the character had become a "LGBTQ icon." [24] [25] [26] He added that Shang's role would be served by two new characters, Commander Tung and Chen Honghui.

[24] [26] Even so, some reviewers called the interactions between Honghui and Mulan to be "more homoerotic" than Li Shang's in the animated version and "can be read as bisexual" while others criticized the reasoning of Reed as incorrect. [27] [28] Mulan was described, by one scholar as having a character, Mulan herself, who could "successfully 'pass' as the opposite sex" and as subverting her traditionally assigned gender signifiers, while having an "unusually masculine body." It was further stated that as a result, Mulan was the "perfect embodiment of a drag king" even though she maintains her heterosexuality as she is attracted to Li Sheng, comparing Mulan's interpretation of her sexuality to that of Bugs Bunny.

[29] Furthermore, gay playwright Harvey Fierstein voiced a character in Mulan, and only accepted the part after confirming that the rest of the cast was Asian so he would not take work away from an Asian actor. [30] 2000s [ edit ] From December 2004 to December 2006, W.I.T.C.H. aired on ABC Kids, ABC Family, and Toon Disney, along with France 3 in France. In April 2016, Greg Weisman, the producer of Season 2, said that Irma is a lesbian, only interested in "guys that are obviously out of reach," trying to be straight, but by doing this, she is "guaranteeing when i grow up disney junior she won't have to actually wind up with a guy" and when she comes close, she "comes close to landing one of them, she bolts." Even so, he left it open to interpretation, saying that this doesn't make it "impossible for her to when i grow up disney junior straight or bisexual or whatever." [31] Weisman also said that Nerissa was Cassidy's lover, killing each other when they were in a romantic relationship with one another.

[32] Both began a relationship, in Weisman's words, after spending a lot of time together as teammates, and said that she "loved and mourned Cassidy." [33] [34] Even so, Weisman did not correct a fan when they described Nerissa as bisexual. [31] Weisman also said that Cassidy and Nerissa were in a relationship when Nerissa killed her.

[32] The episode from the original Proud Family series " Who You Calling a Sissy" was pulled from the network after its initial airing on August 12, 2005 as a result of regarding Michael’s sexual orientation while frequently being called a "sissy" at the time.

The ban was lifted in 2020 as the episode is available to stream on Disney+.

when i grow up disney junior

Ralph Farquhar revealed that in The Proud Family, which aired on the Disney Channel from 2001 to 2005, they had to use "code to talk about if Michael was gay, to talk about sexuality" and to be "sort of underhanded about it." He said this changed with The Proud Family: Louder and Prouder with the biggest changes to the show were "gender identity, obviously racial identity and quote-unquote wokeness,” and said that sexuality can be "sort of in your face with it a lot more," manifesting itself in the storytelling.

Bruce W. Smith also said that the show has more than "just one gay person.representing the entire LGBTQ+ spectrum" and said that it is "not fair" to only have one LGBTQ character in the series. [35] Barry and Randell kiss in the episode "Father Figures".

It is the first Disney series to feature a same-sex kiss between a married couple. 2010s [ edit ] On February 15, 2016, series finale of Gravity Falls, aired on the Disney Channel featured Sheriff Blubs and Deputy Durland confirmed as a gay couple. [36] [37] [38] In March 2017, Star vs. the Forces of Evil would make headlines with an episode entitled "Just Friends." The episode featured characters attending a concert and later concert-goers starting to kiss, "including several same-sex couples.in the background." [39] Chris Nee, the creator of Doc McStuffins pictured accepting the Peabody for Doc McStuffins In August 2017, Doc McStuffins, featured a lesbian (and interracial) married couple, Thea and Edie, voiced by lesbian actresses Wanda Sykes and Portia de Rossi respectively.

[40] [41] [42] These two characters would be the first same-sex couple featured in a Disney Junior pre-school series. Some, like Jeremy Blacklow, GLAAD director of entertainment media, would argue that this episode would be a turning point for executives who fears boycotts from conservative groups like the Family Research Council and One Million Moms, calling the episode a "major win for both Disney and preschool series," showing that LGBTQ characters could appears in shows aimed at younger viewers without retaliation or crisis.

[43] On September 30, 2018, Marvel Rising: Secret Warriors aired on the Disney Channel and Disney XD. The team included America Chavez, the first Latina, and lesbian, superhero in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, who had already appeared in animated shorts titled " Marvel Rising: Initiation".

[44] [45] GLAAD expressed hope that the film would allow Chavez to be represented accurately, and "serve as an introduction of America and further queer characters to the Marvel Cinematic Universe." [46] The film was later described as "a superhero tale with diversity oozing out of every animated frame," with note of Chavez having two mothers.

[47] Star Wars Resistance, which aired from October 2018 to January 2020 on the Disney Channel and Disney XD, featured LGBTQ characters. In this animation, Orka and Flix run the Office of Acquisitions on the Colossus, with Orka doing the negotiations.

[48] Justin Ridge, an executive producer for the show, said that it's safe to call them a couple, adding "they’re absolutely a gay couple and we’re proud of that" on the Coffee With Kenobi podcast.

[49] [50] Some said that they didn't see themselves in the show because they were only confirmed outside of the show's universe by the show's creators. [51] In December 2018, the creator of Big City Greens, Chris Houghton, confirmed, on Tumblr, that Alexander and Terry are a couple, [52] although protagonist Cricket Green does not seem to realize that they are gay throughout the series. Alexander is loud, rather effeminate and bossy, and Terry is silent and an introvert.

They both appear to be hanging out each other in a few episodes such as "Gridlocked", "Fill Bill", "Barry Cuda", and "Trailer Trouble". Alexander is voiced by John Early, a gay actor. In April 2019, it was shown that Jackie Lynn Thomas, a character in Star vs. the Forces of Evil, is bisexual. This was because she dated a male character but ended that relationship due to his feelings for the protagonist.

[53] [54] Then, in the April 2019 episode "Britta's Tacos", it is revealed that Jackie has a relationship with a French girl named Chloé. As such, it is clear that Jackie is bisexual.

[55] [56] 2020s [ edit ] On March 6, 2020, Onward, computer-animated urban fantasy adventure film, was released. In the film, Officer Specter briefly appears and in one scene she discusses her girlfriend's daughter pulling her hair out.

[57] She is voiced by Lena Waithe, a lesbian actress. [58] In April 2020, an episode of T.O.T.S., "Seas the Day," would feature a baby dolphin named Donny, adopted by a dolphin lesbian couple.

[59] Also in April 2020, DuckTales, premiered two characters, Indy and Ty, the guardians of Violet Sabrewing and the foster fathers of Lena Sabrewing, who were slated to be recurring characters. [60] On May 22, 2020, an animated short film titled Out premiered on Disney+. This short Pixar film revolves around Greg attempting to hide a framed photo of him and his boyfriend, Manuel, from his parents, out of fear for their disapproval.

The seventh short film in the SparkShorts series, it is both Disney's and Pixar's first short to feature a gay main character and storyline, including an on-screen same-sex kiss. [61] On July 7, 2020, Dana Terrace, the creator of The Owl House, implied a romantic subtext between Amity and Luz, when responding to a fan who posted a screenshot from the upcoming episode " Enchanting Grom Fright" on Twitter, which showed one of the characters in the show, Amity Blight, putting her hands on the shoulders of Luz Noceda, the show's main protagonist, and looking into Luz's eyes.

[62] Claiming "there is no heterosexual explanation" for Amity's action, Terrace responded, "there really isn't". [63] On August 8, 2020, the episode, written by Molly Ostertag, [64] aired, openly presenting and confirming Disney's first animated LGBT+ female non- recurring character. In previous episodes, Luz had shown interest in male characters but had begun to grow closer to Amity. On the other hand, Amity is shown to have a crush on Luz, confirming her to be lesbian or bisexual. Terrace confirmed Luz as bisexual in a Reddit AMA in September 2020.

[65] In the August 2020 " Enchanting Grom Fright" episode of The Owl House, Luz and Amity dance together, while casting spells, to defeat "Grom," a demon that manifests as their deepest fears. The animation supervisor for the show, Spencer Wan, hinted at this, referring to their intimate dance, which he storyboarded with Hayley Foster, as "the gay thing" [66] and the first time he got to "do anything even remotely queer." [67] The following day, he posted an animatic of Luz and Amity's dance scene.

[68] Amity and Luz represent Disney's first animated LGBT+ female regular characters. Terrace confirmed Amity as lesbian in a Reddit AMA in September 2020. [65] When i grow up disney junior the August 2020 episode of The Owl House, titled "Understanding Willow", one of the main characters (Willow Park) is shown to have two dads (Gilbert and Harvey Park).

[69] In September 2020, Amber Vanich, a story revisionist for Rapunzel's Tangled Adventure revealed that Cassandra "Cass" was gay coded, with sapphic looks toward the story's protagonist, Rapunzel, and that some of these feelings are shown in the episode about memory loss.

[70] She also said that there were many "queer women who boarded scenes [of] Cassandra," and that women-love-women vibes were ingrained in every drawing she did of the character. [71] These beliefs were also reflected by Klaudia Amenábar of The Mary Sue, calling Cass an "extremely gay-coded sword lesbian best friend" of Rapunzel.

[72] Earlier in the year, the series creator of Tangled, Chris Sonnenberg, said that he would be willing to produce a spinoff show focusing on Cass, when i grow up disney junior the call came." [73] The year before, in November, he called Cass a strong female character [74] and talked about the "real friendship bond" between her and Rapunzel in September of the same year.

[75] On September 29, 2020, Samantha "Sam" King, a writer for the Season 3 episode of DuckTales, "They Put a Moonlander On the Earth!", confirmed that Lieutenant Penumbra is a lesbian character.

[76] However, King wished it had been more overt and said that people should continue to ask for better representation. [76] In February 2021, Ralph Farquhar revealed that in The Proud Family, which aired on the Disney Channel from 2001 to 2005, they had to use "code to talk about if Michael was gay, to talk about sexuality" and when i grow up disney junior be "sort of underhanded about it." He said this changed with The Proud Family: Louder and Prouder with the biggest changes to the show ere "gender identity, obviously racial identity and quote-unquote wokeness,” and said that sexuality can be "sort of in your face with it a lot more," manifesting itself in the storytelling.

[77] ND Stevenson is the creator of the webcomic, Nimona In February 2021, Deadline reported that when i grow up disney junior film adaptation of Nimona was cancelled due to the shutdown of Blue Sky Studios. [78] Webcomics commenter Gary Tyrrell criticized the decision, saying, "[Disney] could have allowed a very different kind of young heroine. I mourn for those who would have found a vision of themselves in an animated version". [79] Sources told CBR that the film was "75% complete".

[80] Anonymous staffers at Blue Sky interviewed by Business Insider bemoaned the cancellation of the film, calling it "heartbreaking," arguing that the film "didn't look like anything else in the animated world," and saying that they believe it will never "be completed and released." [81] A few staffers confirmed to BuzzFeed News that the film had an "I love you" scene between Blackheart and Goldenloin.

[82] In June 2021, Mey Rude, a writer for Out, said she still held out "hope that this film…will find its way back to life somehow." [83] In July 2021, Meggie Gates in Bitch, said the film would have been Disney's first "legitimately queer film" and could have been a turning point "for how the corporation handles queerness" but that the Disney chose to "bury its gays" by cancelling the film, a blow to queer Disney fans. [84] In April 2022, it was announced that Annapurna Pictures revived the film and will be releasing it on Netflix in 2023.

[85] In March 2021, Kelly Marie Tran, the voice actor of Raya in the film Raya and the Last Dragon, argued that Raya is queer, stating that she believed there were "some romantic feelings" between Raya and Namaari in the story. She later made clear that this isn't the official Disney position and hoped for a Disney warrior that is "openly in the LGBTQ community" in the future, perhaps even a person who is disabled.

[86] On March 17, 2021, two days after the broadcast of the series finale of DuckTales, storyboarder Sam King said that although she did not wish to "become "Word of Board Artist" on every headcannon and ship", she would permit fans to "assume I think every character except, like, Lunaris, is LGBTQIA+ in some shape or another." [87] On May 12, 2021, the reboot of the early 2000s animated sitcom, The Proud Family, which is titled The Proud Family: Louder and Prouder was announced.

The series will include Barry and Randall Leibowitz-Jenkins as the adoptive parents of Maya Leibowitz-Jenkins, an interracial gay couple. [88] Michael When i grow up disney junior, a recurring character from The Proud Family, is confirmed to be gender non-conforming and gay. [89] The executive producers of the series, Bruce W. Smith and Ralph Farquhar, said that the "show never really went away" and called it the "perfect time to bring back this show." [90] ScreenRant argued that the revival will break down barriers through inclusion of multicultural families and characters belonging to the LGBTQ+ community.

[91] Alex Hirsch and Grunkle Stan puppet (character of Gravity Falls) at San Diego Comic-Con International 2013; Hirsch is the creator of Gravity Falls In early June 2021, in celebration of Pride Month, Disney unveiled new merchandise and tweeted an illustration. In response, Alex Hirsch, the creator of A Disney series, Gravity Falls, criticized Disney studio executives for cutting LGBTQ scenes from their shows. In his tweet, which was retweeted thousands of times he urged people to "mercilessly" spam the executives by saying there is "room for everyone under the rainbow" if the executives claim LGBTQ+ characters are not "Disney appropriate." [5] [6] In June 2021, Luca was released on Disney+.

Some argued that the film felt "gay" even if not "explicitly queer," and more ambiguous, comparing it to the 2017 live-action film Call Me by Your Name and the 2020 animated film Wolfwalkers.

[92] [5] Others said that Luca and Alberto hiding their true sea monster identities was an allegory for people who are members of the LGBTQ+ community, feeling as though they need to hide their true selves in order to be accepted. [93] The film's director, Enrico Casarosa, said this was unintentional and that his original vision for the film was to explore the time in a child's life before romance, [94] but he has since welcomed the interpretation after the film's release, also stating: "While I identify with pronouns he/him and I am a straight man, the themes of diversity, acceptance and inclusion in our movie are dear to my heart".

[95] On July 10, 2021, The Owl House episode "Through the Looking Glass Ruins" premiered on the Disney Channel. One reviewer, Mey Rude said that the episode pushes forward the relationship between Luz and Amity, with Amity putting her job as a librarian in jeopardy to help Luz, while the latter goes through trials to get Amity her job back, and Amity kissing Luz on the cheek.

[96] Rude also noted that the LGBTQ characters in the show are "fleshed-out characters," pointed out the episode, directed by Bo Coburn, was co-written by Molly Ostertag and Terrace, with the former writing " Enchanting Grom Fright" and "Wing It Like Witches." That episode was co-written by Rachel Vine.

Another reviewer described the episode as delivering a "definitive message that love transcends gender even in the world of children’s animation." [97] The same reviewer also said that fans shouldn't look to "giant corporations for continual queer representation" and expressed their frustration at the end of The Owl House after its third season airs.

Another reviewer noted that Luz and Amity were beginning to "understand their feelings for one another." [97] On July 24, 2021, The Owl House episode "Eda's Requiem" featured a character named Raine Whispers, who goes by they/them pronouns and is voiced by transgender and non-binary actor Avi Roque. [98] [99] Raine is Disney's first non-binary character. [100] [101] In the episode, Eda Clawthorne is shown to have feelings for Raine. The subsequent episode, "Knock, Knock, Knockin' on Hooty's Door", which aired on July 31, reveals that Eda and Raine were formerly dating, before breaking up.

[102] The episode also has Luz and Amity asking each other out, officially becoming a couple. [97] GLAAD praised the episode, saying they were excited to see a "wonderful and affirming message" from the series. [103] The teen version of Raine Whispers is also voiced by a non-binary actor Blu del Barrio.

[104] The series' Latin American dub in September 2021 was met with criticism by both viewers and Roque for portraying Raine as a cisgender male instead of non-binary. [105] The character has also been portrayed as a cisgender male in other dubs. On October 3, 2021, one of the creators of The Ghost and Molly McGee, Bob Roth, said there is LGBTQ representation in the show, which starts small and later includes main characters, and urged fans to "let it unfold naturally." [106] He also said that people were reading too much into the interactions between Libby and Molly McGee in one episode, assuming it is romantic.

[107] On October 5, 2021, the series introduced Ms. Roop, a history teacher at Brighton Middle School. In the episode "Mazel Tov, Libby!", she is shown slow-dancing with a woman. [108] In the following episode "No Good Deed", she is confirmed to be a lesbian and the woman she dance with is Pam, her wife. [109] Ms. Roop is voiced by lesbian actress Jane Lynch.

On October 5, 2021, in an AMA on Reddit, Dana Terrace, the creator of The Owl House, explained the show was cancelled not because of ratings or COVID-19 pandemic but rather because business people at Disney believed it did not fit "into the Disney brand." She stated that this was the case due to the serialized nature of the show and an audience which "skews older," rather than due to its LGBTQ+ representation, saying she wouldn't "assume bad faith" against those she works within Los Angeles.

She also noted that due to the pandemic, budgets were constrained, episodes were cut, and noted that she wasn't allowed to present a case for a fourth season, and said she believed there was a future for the show if Disney Television had "different people in charge." [110] Amphibia introduced the same-sex couple, Ally and Jess, collectively known as When i grow up disney junior I.T.

Gals. [111] In the text of their video descriptions, the pair describe themselves as "just two girlfriends", qualified with an LGBT pride flag emoji. Lead character designer Andy Garner-Flexer later confirmed, in late October 2021, on his Twitter account that they are dating, saying that Ally's color palette was based on the pansexual pride flag, while Jess' was based on the bisexual pride flag. [112] [113] On November 6, 2021, the Amphibia episode "Sprig's Birthday" was released, in which, during a brief scene, a marriage proposal is taking place between two men, with one of them, Tyler, having arranged with a stunt plane to spell the words "Will You Marry Me?" in the sky for his partner.

[114] In February 2022, the short-form series Rise Up, Sing Out was released on Disney Junior and Disney+. The character Amelia has two moms. [115] On March 10, 2022, Pixar employees argued that "nearly every moment" of openly gay affection was cut due to demands from Disney executives, even if creative teams and Pixar executives objected, arguing that these employees are being barred from creating queer content in animated films.

[116] [117] [118] Some critics countered that Pixar also downplayed queer moments in films like Luca and Turning Red. [119] It was later reported in mid-March 2022 that a same-sex kiss in Lightyear, which will be releasing on June 17, is being reinstated, with the film featuring the studio's "first-ever on-screen kiss between two characters of the same gender" between Alisha Hawthorne and another female character. [120] At the same time, Lilith, Eda's older sister in The When i grow up disney junior House, was confirmed to be aromatic asexual.

[121] [122] Jade King of The Gamer noted that Cissy Jones said that her letter during a charity stream saying that Lilith didn't have any romantic attractions was "basically canon," further confirming those identities. [123] On April 16, 2022, Boscha was hinted to have two moms in The Owl House episode "Them's the Breaks, Kid" as two Hexside students bear a resemblance to Boscha.

[124] On April 25, 2022, Dana Terrance confirmed The Collector is non-binary and uses he/they pronouns. [125] Criticism and expanded representation [ edit ] Disney executives did not always receive LGBTQ characters and relationships positively.

They, for instance, axed a proposed lesbian relationship in Gravity Falls, at the same time that Gumball was censored for supposed "homosexual overtones" by various countries, and the National Expert Commission of Ukraine on the Protection of Public Morality in Ukraine advised the banning of SpongeBob SquarePants on the grounds that it promoted homosexuality.

[126] [127] As such, Disney has been criticized for its approach to LGBTQ representation as compared to Cartoon Network. [4] In June 2021, David Levine, a former Disney executive who oversaw kids programming for 16 years, said that "a lot of conservative opinion" driving depictions of characters of the Disney Channel, Cartoon Network, and Nickelodeon, with no hope for LGBTQ representation, saying he still has similar conversations to this day.

[43] In March 2022, amid the controversy of Disney's involvement in Florida's "Don't Say Gay" bill and lack of criticism from CEO Bob Chapek until after the bill had passed, three former Blue Sky staff members stated the Nimona film received pushback from Disney leadership, centered around the film's LGBT themes and a same-sex kiss.

[128] [129] While staffers said that the kiss scene was taken out of presentations to Disney executives, they said still held out hope that it would be included in the final film. [130] [131] In March 2022, leaked clips from a Walt Disney Company meeting showed the president of Disney General Entertainment, Karey Burke, explain to staff that she is a parent of "two queer children," and the production coordinator at Disney Television Animation, Allen Martsch, note that his team is trying to include "more trans and gender non-conforming characters" in Disney animations.

[132] Also, in the meeting, Layota Raveneau, series director of The Proud Family: Louder and Prouder and Rise Up, Sing Out, said that she was adding queerness wherever she could in the projects she worked on for Disney. [133] [134] Elsewhere, Burke promised that 50% of the characters in content created by the Disney General Entertainment would be "from minority groups." [132] [133] In April 2022, Peter C.

Kunze, a historian at Tulane University argued that there is a "long history of LGBTQ audiences and employees "supporting, even saving, the company from veritable demise." He also said that Disney relied on LGBTQ people to "revamp its animated films." He argued that Disney CEO Bob Chapek should remember the company's history and "understand the invaluable contributions LGBTQ communities have made to the company he leads." [15] See also [ edit ] • Cartoon Network and LGBT representation • Netflix and LGBT representation in animation • LGBT representation in adult animation • LGBT representation in animated web series • List of LGBT-related films by year • Cross-dressing in film and television • List of cross-dressing characters in animated series • List of animated films with LGBT characters • List of lesbian characters in animation • List of gay characters in animation • List of bisexual characters in animation • List of fictional pansexual characters • List of fictional trans characters • List of fictional asexual characters • List of fictional trans characters • List of fictional intersex characters • List of fictional non-binary characters References [ edit ] Citations [ edit ] • ^ a b Seymour, Craig (6 October 2000).

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Further reading [ edit ] • Benecke, Joanna (25 March 2014). "Why don't we see LGBT parents portrayed in children's films?". The Guardian. • "Disney promises LGBT 'commitment': 'We want to represent our audience' ". BBC News. 13 March 2020. • Baume, Matt (8 August 2021).

"Disney Films Have "Poor" LGBTQ+ Representation". .them. • Bump, Emily (28 June 2021). "15 Times Disney Featured LGBTQ+ Characters In Movies & TV Shows". Screenrant. • Brown, Tracy (10 March 2020). "Why token LGBTQ representation in Disney films isn't enough".

Los Angeles Times. • Griffin, Sean P. (2000). Tinker Belles and Evil Queens: The Walt Disney Company from the Inside Out. New York City: New York University Press. ISBN 9780814738702. • Laman, Douglas (8 August 2021). "Why Disney Is Failing at LGBTQ+ Representation". Collider. • Maier, Kodi (October 2017). "Camping Outside the Magic Kingdom's Gates: The Power of Femslash in the Disney Fandom".

Networking Knowledge. 10 (3): 27–32, 41. Archived from the original on 2020-02-28. Retrieved March 20, 2022. • Fan, Jason (November 2018). "Queering Disney animated films using a critical literacy lens". Journal of LGBT Youth. 16 (2): 27–32, 41. doi: 10.1080/19361653.2018.1537871. S2CID 149968517. Retrieved March 20, 2022.

• Mana Vaz, Priscila; Pereira Toth, Janderson; de Oliveira Moreira, Thaiane (2021). "From Disney to LGBTQ tales: The South-American Snow White in Over the Rainbow: Um Livro de Contos de Fadxs" (PDF). In Pallant, Chris; Holliday, Christopher (eds.). Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs: New Perspectives on Production, Reception, Legacy (1st ed.).

New York: Bloomsbury Academic. pp. 217–220, 228–229. doi: 10.5040/9781501351198.ch-012. ISBN 978-1-5013-5122-8. S2CID 234235353. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2021-07-16. • Minzner, KJ (10 August 2020). "Disney Forbade Gravity Falls From Including LGBTQ+ Representation Says Creator".

Screenrant. • Taberrer, Jamie (10 October 2020). "17 gay and LGBTQ Disney characters - from coded to canon to catastrophe". Attitude. • Nabila, Annisa Fikri; Surwati, Chatarina Heny Dwi (August 2, 2021). "REPRESENTASI LGBTQ DALAM FILM ANIMASI DISNEY" [LGBTQ REPRESENTATION IN DISNEY ANIMATION FILM] (PDF). Journal Komunikasi Massa (in Indonesian).

1: 1–3. Retrieved March 20, 2022. • Roberts, Shearon, ed. (2020). Recasting the Disney Princess in an Era of New Media and Social Movements (1st ed.). Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield.

ISBN 9781793604026. • St. Jacques, Macie Lee (2021). "When will my reflection show who I am inside?": Queering Disney Fantasy" (Master of Arts). Rhode Island College. Add links • This page was last edited on 7 May 2022, at 16:00 (UTC). • Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License 3.0 ; additional terms may apply.

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• Marvel Entertainment • National Geographic Partners (73%) Website thewaltdisneycompany .com Footnotes / references [2] The Walt Disney Company, commonly known as Disney ( / ˈ d ɪ z n i/), [3] is an American multinational entertainment and mass media conglomerate headquartered at the Walt Disney Studios complex in Burbank, California.

Disney was originally founded on October 16, 1923, by brothers Walt and Roy O. Disney as the Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio; [4] it also operated under the names the Walt Disney Studio and Walt Disney Productions before changing its name to the Walt Disney Company in 1986. The company established itself as a leader in the American animation industry before diversifying into live-action film production, television, and theme parks. Since the 1980s, Disney has created and acquired corporate divisions in order to market more mature content than is typically associated with its flagship family-oriented brands.

The company is known for its film studio division, Walt Disney Studios, which includes Walt Disney Pictures, Walt Disney Animation Studios, Pixar, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, 20th Century Studios, 20th Century Animation, and Searchlight Pictures. Disney's other main business units include divisions in television, broadcasting, streaming media, theme park resorts, consumer products, publishing, and international operations.

Through these various segments, Disney owns and operates the ABC broadcast network; cable television networks such as Disney Channel, ESPN, Freeform, FX, and National Geographic; publishing, merchandising, music, and theater divisions; direct-to-consumer streaming services such as Disney+, Star+, ESPN+, Hulu, and Hotstar; and Disney Parks, Experiences and Products, a group of 14 theme parks, resort hotels, and cruise lines around the world.

[5] [6] The cartoon character Mickey Mouse, created in 1928 by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks, serves as the company's mascot.

[7] The company, which trades on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) with ticker symbol DIS, [8] has been a component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average since 1991. [9] In August 2020, just under two-thirds of the stock was owned by large financial institutions. [10] Contents • 1 History • 1.1 1923–1934: Founding, Mickey Mouse, and Silly Symphonies • 1.2 1934–1948: Feature films, strike, and World War II • 1.3 1950–1966: Television, Disneyland, and Walt Disney's death • 1.4 1966–1984: Roy O.

Disney's leadership and death, Walt Disney World, new leadership, theatrical malaise • 1.5 1984–2005: When i grow up disney junior Eisner's leadership, Disney Renaissance, and Merger with Capital Cities/ABC, Inc.

• 1.6 2005–2020: Bob Iger's leadership and company expansion • 1.7 2020–present: Bob Chapek's leadership and COVID-19 pandemic • 2 Company units • 2.1 Divisions • 2.2 Content groups • 3 Leadership • 3.1 Current • 3.2 Past leadership • 4 Financial data • 4.1 Revenues • 4.2 Operating income • 5 Criticism • 6 See also • 7 References • 7.1 Notes • 7.2 Citations • 7.3 Works Cited • 8 Further reading • 8.1 Chronology of company • 9 External links History (left to right) Walt Disney and his brother Roy O.

Disney co-founded The Disney Brother Studios, which later became The Walt Disney Company At Laugh-O-Gram Studio, a film studio in Kansas City founded by Walt Disney and his friend and animator Ub Iwerks, [11] Disney made a short film entitled Alice's Wonderland, which featured child actress Virginia Davis interacting with animated characters.

In 1923, soon after the short was made, Disney filed for bankruptcy, but the short later became a hit after New York film distributor Margaret J. Winkle purchased it, with Disney signing a contract for six Alice Comedies, with an option for two further series of six episodes each.

[12] [13] Before the signing, Disney decided to move to Hollywood to join his brother Roy O. Disney because Roy had tuberculosis. [14] This allowed them to co-find The Disney Brothers Studio to produce the films. He later convinced Iwerks and Davis' family to move to Hollywood as well. [13] In January 1926, with the completion of the Disney studio on Hyperion Street, The Disney Brothers Studio's name was changed to Walt Disney Studio.

[15] After making several Alice films for the next four years, Winkler handed the role of distributing films to her husband Charles Mintz. In 1927, Mintz asked for a new series of films under Universal Pictures to be made, so Disney created his first series of fully animated films that would feature the character Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. [16] Walt Disney Studio went on to create 26 films with Oswald in them. [17] In 1928, Disney wanted a larger fee for his films, but Mintz wanted to reduce the price.

After Disney found out that Universal owned the intellectual property rights to Oswald, Mintz threatened to produce the films without him if Disney did not take the reductions in payment. [17] [18] Disney declined, and Mintz signed four of Disney's primary animators to his studio, with the exception Iwerks who stayed with Disney.

[19] [16] Because of the loss of Oswald, Disney and Iwerks replaced him with a mouse originally named Mortimer Mouse, until Disney’s wife urged him to change it so he called him Mickey Mouse. [20] In May, they made two silent films with the character, Plane Crazy and The Gallopin' Gaucho, as test screenings. Later, Disney’s first sound film and third short to the Mickey series Steamboat Willie was made with synchronized sound, creating the first post-produced sound cartoon. [21] Disney found Pat Powers’ distribution company to distribute the film, and Steamboat Willie became an immediate hit, leading the way for the companies dominance in the animation industry.

[20] [22] [23] The sound was created using Powers’ Cinephone system, which used Lee de Forest's Phonofilm system. [24] Disney later successfully re-released the two earlier films with synchronized sound in 1929. [25] [26] (left to right) Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, who Disney lost the rights to, and Mickey Mouse, who replaced Oswald, as seen in Steamboat Willie After the release of Steamboat Willie at the Colony Theater in New York, Mickey Mouse became an immensely popular character.

[26] [20] Disney would go one to make several cartoons featuring Mickey and other characters such as Donald Duck and Goofy.

when i grow up disney junior

{INSERTKEYS} [27] In August, Disney began the Silly Symphony series with Columbia Pictures signing on as the series' distributor, because Walt and Roy felt that they were not getting there share of the profits with Power . [23] Powers would then sign off Iwerks, who would later start his own studio. [28] Carl Starling played a pivotal role in getting the series started and composed the music for the earlier films in the series, but would later leave the company after Iwerks did.

[29] [30] In September, theater manager Harry Woodin requested permission to start a Mickey Mouse Club at his theater the Fox Dome to boost attendance. Walt agreed, but David E.

Dow started one at Elsinore Theatre before Woodin could start his. It is unknown why Woodin did not create the first one, but on December 21, the first ever meeting for the club at Elsinore had around 1,200 children in attendance.

The Mickey Mouse Clubs ended up spanning over 800 theaters across the country, with one million kids as members. [31] [32] On July 24, Joseph Conley, president of King Features Syndicate, mailed the Disney studio asking for them to make a Mickey Mouse comic strip. They started in November and sent samples of the strip to them, which were approved. [33] On December 16, the Walt Disney Studios partnership was reorganized as a corporation with the name of Walt Disney Productions, Limited, with a merchandising division – Walt Disney Enterprises, and two subsidiaries – Disney Film Recording Company, Limited; and Liled Realty and Investment Company, for real estate holdings.

Walt and his wife held 60 percent (6,000 shares) and Roy owned 40 percent of the company. [34] The comic strip Mickey Mouse debuted on January 13, 1930, in the New York Daily Mirror and by 1931, the strip was published in 60 newspapers in the US, as well as papers in twenty other countries. [35] After finding out that coming out with merchandise for the characters would generate more revenue for the company, at hotel a man in New York asked Walt for the license to put Mickey Mouse on some writing tablets he was manufacturing for $300.

Walt agreed and Mickey became the first licensed character ever, beginning the start of Disney merchandising. [36] [37] In 1933, Walt asked a man who owned a Kansas City advertising firm named Kay Kamen to run Disney's merchandising. He agreed and completely transformed Disney's merchandising.

Within a year, Kamen had 40 licenses for Mickey and within two years, $35 million worth of sales were made. In 1934, Walt claimed that he made more money from the merchandising of Mickey than from the Mickey films.

[38] [39] Later, as a part of Disney's merchandising push, the Waterbury Clock Company created a Mickey Mouse watch. It became so popular that it saved Waterbury from bankruptcy during the Great Depression. During a promotional event at Macy’s, 11,000 Mickey Mouse watches sold in one day and within two years, 2.5 million watches were sold. [40] [35] [39] After a fallout with Colombia Pictures for the Silly Symphonies, Walt signed a distribution contract with United Artist from 1932 to 1937.

[41] [42] In 1932, Disney signed an exclusive contract with Technicolor through the end of 1935 to produce cartoons in color, beginning with Flowers and Trees (1932), which was part of the Silly Symphonies. [43] The film was the first ever full-color cartoon and won the Academy Award for the Best Cartoon later that year. [21] In 1933, The Three Little Pigs became another popular Silly Symphonies and also won the Academy Award for Best Cartoon.

[27] [44] The song from the film " Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?", composed by Frank Churchill who also wrote other Silly Symphonies songs, became popular throughout the 1930s and remained one of the most well-known Disney songs.

[29] Films from Silly Symphonies would go on to win the Best Cartoon award from 1931 to 1939, except for in 1938 when another Disney film Ferdinand the Bull won it. [27] 1934–1948: Feature films, strike, and World War II The original animation building at Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, California, which they built with the profits from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs In 1934, Walt decided to make Disney's first ever feature-length animated film and told his animators by acting out the story of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

Roy tried to stop Walt from making it saying it would bankrupt the studio, and Hollywood called it "Disney's Folly", but Walt continued production on the film. [45] [46] Walt decided to go for a realistic approach to the film and created scenes from the film as if it were live action. [47] During the process of making the film, they created the multiplane camera, which was pieces of glass with drawings on them set at different distances, to create an illusion of depth for the backgrounds.

[48] After United Artist attempted to attain future television rights to the Disney shorts, Walt signed distribution contract with RKO Radio Pictures on March 2, 1936.

[42] They ended up exceeding their original budget for Snow White of $150,000 by ten times the amount at $1.5 million. [45] It took them three years to make, debuting on December 12, 1937, becoming the highest-grossing film of all time to that point at $8,000,000 equivalent to $150,796,296 in 2021; after several re-releases, the film would gross a total of $998,440,000 adjusted for inflation.

[49] [50] [51] After the profits of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Disney financed the construction of a new studio complex in Burbank, California, which was fully moved into in 1940. [52] On April 2, of the same year, Disney had its initial public offering, with the common stock remaining with Walt and his family, although Walt did not want to go public, but the company needed the money.

[53] Shortly before Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs' release, work on their next films Pinocchio and Bambi began, with Bambi being postponed. [42] Though Pinocchio would win the Academy Awards for Best Song and Best Score, along with making groundbreaking achievements in animations, [54] it would end up doing poorly in the box office during its release on February 23, 1940, because its international releases were cut off because of World War II.

[55] [56] Art Babbitt leading a picket at the premiere of The Reluctant Dragon during the strike Disney's next film Fantasia was also a box-office bomb, but made great achievements by creating Fantasound, an early development surround sound, to produce the films' soundtrack, making it the first commercial film shown in stereo. [57] [58] [59] In 1941, Disney would have a major setback when 300 of its 800 animators, led mainly by Art Babbit, one of the companies top animators, would go on strike for five weeks for unionization, because of the amount of payment some of them were getting.

Walt thought that the people on strike were secretly Communist and would end up firing many of the studios' animators, including some of its top ones. [60] [61] [62] Roy would try to get the companies' main distributors to invest in the film company, trying to secure more production funds for the studio which could no longer afford to offset production costs with employee layoffs, but was unsuccessful in getting anyone. [63] During the premiere of The Reluctant Dragon, Disney's fourth film where Robert Benchley would tour the Disney Studio, protesters from the strike showed up; the film would fall $100,000 dollars short of its production cost.

[64] [65] While negotiations were being made for the strike, Walt accepted an offer from the Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs to make a goodwill trip, along with some of his animators, to South America, making sure Walt would be gone during the deal because he knew the results would not be in his favor.

[66] During the twelve weeks there, they would start plotting for films and were inspired by the music there. [67] As a result of the strike, the studio recognized the Screen Cartoonist's Guild after being compelled to by Federal mediators and loss several animators, leaving the company with only 694 employees.

[68] [62] To recover from their financial losses, Disney would create their fifth animated film Dumbo in a rush with a lower budget. Dumbo performed successfully at the box office and would be a much needed financial gain for the company. [54] [69] After the bombing of Pear Harbor, many of the companies animators would be drafted into the army. [70] Later, 500 soldiers from the United States Army began an occupation of the studio for eight months to protect a nearby Lockheed aircraft plant, where they would also fix equipment in large soundstages and convert storage sheds into ammunition depots.

[71] [72] On December 8, the Navy asked Walt to create propaganda films to gain support for the war. He agreed and signed a contract with them to create 20 war-related shorts for $90,000. [73] Most of the companies' employees got to work on the project and created films such as Victory Through Air Power and included some of the companies' characters in several of the films.

[74] [70] In August, 1942, Bambi was finally released as Disney's sixth animated film and did not do well in the box office. [65] In 1943, Disney would go on to make Saludos Amigos and The Three Caballeros after their visit to South America, but they would do poorly upon their releases. [70] [75] The two films were " package films", several short cartoons grouped together to make a feature film, which Disney would go on to make more such as Make Mine Music, Melody Time, Fun and Fancy Free, and The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr.

Toad to try to recover from their financial losses. [70] As less expensive to make, the studio started production on live-action films, with a mixture of animation, starting with Song of the South, which would later become Disney's most controversial film. [76] [77] Because the company was short on money, in 1944, they planned to re-release their feature films, which would create much needed revenue.

[77] [78] In 1948, Disney began the nature documentary series True-Life Adventures, which would run until 1960 and win eight Academy Awards. [79] [80] 1950–1966: Television, Disneyland, and Walt Disney's death The release of Cinderella in 1950 proved that feature-length animation could still succeed in the marketplace.

Other releases of the period included Alice in Wonderland (1951) and Peter Pan (1953), both in production before the war began, and Disney's first all-live action feature, Treasure Island (1950). Other early all-live-action Disney films included The Story of Robin Hood and His Merrie Men (1952), The Sword and the Rose (1953), and 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954).

Disney ended its distribution contract with RKO in 1953, forming its own distribution arm, Buena Vista Distribution. [81] Walt Disney at the grand opening of Disneyland, July 1955. In December 1950, Walt Disney Productions and the Coca-Cola Company teamed up for Disney's first venture into television, the NBC television network special One Hour in Wonderland.

In October 1954, the ABC network launched Disney's first regular television series. In 1954, Walt Disney used his Disneyland series to unveil what would become Disneyland, an idea conceived out of a desire for a place where parents and children could both have fun at the same time.

On July 18, 1955, Walt Disney opened Disneyland to the general public. On July 17, 1955, Disneyland was previewed with a live television broadcast hosted by Robert Cummings, Art Linkletter, and Ronald Reagan. After a shaky start, Disneyland continued to grow and attract visitors from across the country and around the world. A major expansion in 1959 included the addition of America's first monorail system. For the 1964 New York World's Fair, Disney prepared four separate attractions for various sponsors, each of which would find its way to Disneyland in one form or another.

During this time, Walt Disney was also secretly scouting out new sites for a second Disney theme park. In November 1965, "Disney World" was announced, with plans for theme parks, hotels, and even a model city on thousands of acres of land purchased outside of Orlando, Florida. [82] Disney continued to focus its talents on television throughout the 1950s. Its weekday afternoon children's television program The Mickey Mouse Club, featuring its roster of young "Mouseketeers", premiered in 1955 to great success, as did the Davy Crockett miniseries, starring Fess Parker and broadcast on the Disneyland anthology show.< [83] Two years later, the Zorro series would prove just as popular, running for two seasons on ABC.

[84] Despite such success, Walt Disney Productions invested little into television ventures in the 1960s, [ citation needed] with the exception of the long-running anthology series, later known as The Wonderful World of Disney. [83] Disney's film studios stayed busy as well, averaging five or six releases per year during this period.

While the production of shorts slowed significantly during the 1950s and 1960s, the studio released a number of popular animated features, like Lady and the Tramp (1955), Sleeping Beauty (1959) and One Hundred and One Dalmatians (1961), which introduced a new xerography process to transfer the drawings to animation cels. [85] Disney's live-action releases were spread across a number of genres, including historical fiction ( Johnny Tremain, 1957), adaptations of children's books ( Pollyanna, 1960) and modern-day comedies ( The Shaggy Dog, 1959).

Disney's most successful film of the 1960s was a live action/animated musical adaptation of Mary Poppins, which was one of the all-time highest-grossing movies [83] and received five Academy Awards, including Best Actress for Julie Andrews and Best Song for Robert B.

Sherman & Richard M. Sherman for " Chim Chim Cher-ee". [86] The theme park design and architectural group became so integral to the Disney studio's operations that the studio bought it on February 5, 1965, along with the WED Enterprises name. [87] [88] [89] [90] On December 15, 1966, Walt Disney died of complications from smoking related lung cancer, [83] marking the end of an era for the company. 1966–1984: Roy O. Disney's leadership and death, Walt Disney World, new leadership, theatrical malaise Following Walt's death, Roy O.

Disney took over as chairman, CEO, and president of the company. One of his first acts was to rename Disney World as "Walt Disney World" in honor of his brother and his vision. [91] In 1967, the last two films Walt actively supervised were released, the animated feature The Jungle Book [83] and the musical The Happiest Millionaire.

[92] The studio released a number of comedies in the late 1960s, including The Love Bug (1969's highest-grossing film) [83] and The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes (1969), which starred another young Disney discovery, Kurt Russell.

The 1970s opened with the release of Disney's first "post-Walt" animated feature, The Aristocats, followed by a return to fantasy musicals in 1971's Bedknobs and Broomsticks.

[83] Blackbeard's Ghost was another successful film during this period. [83] On October 1, 1971, Walt Disney World opened to the public, with Roy Disney dedicating the facility in person later that month. On December 20, 1971, Roy O.

Disney died of a stroke. He left the company under the control of Donn Tatum, Card Walker, and Walt's son-in-law Ron Miller, each trained by Walt and Roy. While Walt Disney Productions continued releasing family-friendly films throughout the 1970s, such as Escape to Witch Mountain (1975) [83] and Freaky Friday (1976), the films did not fare as well at the box office as earlier material. However, the animation studio saw success with Robin Hood (1973), The Rescuers (1977), and The Fox and the Hound (1981).

As head of the studio, Miller attempted to make films to drive the profitable teenage market who generally passed on seeing Disney films. [93] Inspired by the popularity of Star Wars, Disney produced the science-fiction adventure The Black Hole in 1979; it cost $20 million to make, but was lost in Star Wars ' wake.

[83] The Black Hole was the first Disney film to carry a PG rating in the United States. [93] [N 1] Disney dabbled in the horror genre with The Watcher in the Woods, and financed the boldly innovative Tron; both films were released to minimal success. [83] Disney also hired outside producers for film projects, which had never been done before in the studio's history.

[93] In 1979, Disney entered a joint venture with Paramount Pictures on the production of the 1980 film adaptation of Popeye and Dragonslayer (1981); the first time Disney collaborated with another studio. Paramount distributed Disney films in Canada at the time, and it was hoped that Disney's marketing prestige would help sell the two films. [93] Finally, in 1982, the Disney family sold the naming rights and rail-based attractions to the Disney film studio for 818,461 shares of Disney stock then worth $42.6 million none of which went to Retlaw.

Also, Roy E. Disney objected to the overvalued purchase price of the naming right and voted against the purchase as a Disney board director. [94] The 1983 release of Mickey's Christmas Carol began a string of successful movies, starting with Never Cry Wolf and the Ray Bradbury adaptation Something Wicked This Way Comes. [83] The Walt Disney Productions film division was incorporated on April 1, 1983 as Walt Disney Pictures. [95] In 1984, Disney CEO Ron Miller created Touchstone Films as a brand for Disney to release more major motion pictures.

Touchstone's first release was the comedy Splash (1984), which was a box office success. [96] With The Wonderful World of Disney remaining a prime-time staple, Disney returned to television in the 1970s with syndicated programming such as the anthology series The Mouse Factory and a brief revival of the Mickey Mouse Club. In 1980, Disney launched Walt Disney Home Video to take advantage of the newly emerging videocassette market.

On April 18, 1983, The Disney Channel debuted as a subscription-level channel on cable systems nationwide, featuring its large library of classic films and TV series, along with original programming and family-friendly third-party offerings.

Epcot opened in October 1982. Walt Disney World received much of the company's attention through the 1970s and into the 1980s. In 1978, Disney executives announced plans for the second Walt Disney World theme park, EPCOT Center, which would open in October 1982. Inspired by Walt Disney's dream of a futuristic model city, EPCOT Center was built as a "permanent World's Fair", complete with exhibits sponsored by major American corporations, as well as pavilions based on the cultures of other nations.

In Japan, the Oriental Land Company partnered with Walt Disney Productions to build the first Disney theme park outside of the United States, Tokyo Disneyland, which opened in April 1983. Despite the success of the Disney Channel and its new theme park creations, Walt Disney Productions was financially vulnerable.

Its film library was valuable but offered few current successes, and its leadership team was unable to keep up with other studios, particularly the works of Don Bluth, who defected from Disney in 1979. By the early 1980s, the parks were generating 70 percent of Disney's income. [83] In 1984, financier Saul Steinberg's Reliance Group Holdings launched a hostile takeover bid for Walt Disney Productions, [83] with the intent of selling off some of its operations. [97] Disney bought out Reliance's 11.1% stake in the company.

However, another shareholder filed suit claiming the deal devaluated Disney's stock and for Disney management to retain their positions. The shareholder lawsuit was settled in 1989 for a total of $45 million from Disney and Reliance. [83] Likewise in 1984, MCA (then-parent company of Universal Studios) actually struck a deal with Disney to purchase the company on the condition insisted by the Disney family that Disney CEO Ron W.

Miller be MCA president, but disagreements between MCA chairman Lew Wasserman and Disney over this caused the agreement to fall through completely. [98] 1984–2005: Michael Eisner's leadership, Disney Renaissance, and Merger with Capital Cities/ABC, Inc.

See also: Timeline of The Walt Disney Company § 1984–2004 With the Sid Bass family purchase of 18.7 percent of Disney, Bass and the board brought in Michael Eisner from Paramount as CEO and Frank Wells from Warner Bros.

as president. Eisner emphasized Touchstone, with Down and Out in Beverly Hills (1985) leading to increased output with Good Morning, Vietnam (1987), Dead Poets Society (1989), Pretty Woman (1990) and additional hits. Eisner used expanding cable and home video markets to sign deals using Disney shows and films, making a long-term deal with Showtime Networks for Disney/Touchstone releases through 1996 and entering television with syndication and distribution for TV series such as The Golden Girls and Home Improvement.

Disney began limited releases of its previous films on videotapes in the late 1980s. Eisner's Disney purchased KHJ, an independent Los Angeles TV station. [83] Organized in 1985, Silver Screen Partners II, LP financed films for Disney with $193 million. In January 1987, Silver Screen III began financing movies for Disney with $300 million raised, the largest amount raised for a film financing limited partnership by E.F. Hutton. [99] Silver Screen IV was also set up to finance Disney's studios.

[100] Buoyed by the success of Who Framed Roger Rabbit in 1988, Disney's flagship animation studio enjoyed a series of commercial and critical successes known as the Disney Renaissance, with such films as The Little Mermaid (1989), Beauty and the Beast (1991), Aladdin (1992), and The Lion King (1994).

In addition, the company successfully entered the field of television animation with a number of lavishly-budgeted and acclaimed series such as Adventures of the Gummi Bears, DuckTales, Chip 'n Dale: Rescue Rangers, Darkwing Duck, TaleSpin, Bonkers and Gargoyles. [101] Disney moved to first place in box office receipts by 1988 and had increased revenues by 20 percent every year.

[83] In 1989, Disney signed an agreement-in-principle to acquire Jim Henson Productions from its founder, Muppet creator Jim Henson. The deal included Henson's programming library and Muppet characters (excluding the Muppets created for Sesame Street), as well as Jim Henson's personal creative services.

However, Henson died suddenly in May 1990 before the deal was completed, resulting in the two companies terminating merger negotiations the following December. [102] Named the "Disney Decade" by the company, the executive talent attempted to move the company to new heights in the 1990s with huge changes and accomplishments. [83] In September 1990, Disney arranged for financing up to $200 million by a unit of Nomura Securities for Interscope films made for Disney.

On October 23, Disney formed Touchwood Pacific Partners which would supplant the Silver Screen Partnership series as their movie studios' primary source of funding. [100] In 1991, hotels, home video distribution, and Disney merchandising became 28 percent of total company revenues while international revenues contributed 22 percent of total revenues. The company committed its studios in the first quarter of 1991 to produce 25 films in 1992.

However, 1991 saw net income drop by 23 percent and had no growth for the year, but saw the release of Beauty and the Beast, winner of two Academy Awards and top-grossing film in the genre. Disney next moved into publishing with Hyperion Books and adult music with Hollywood Records while Walt Disney Imagineering was laying off 400 employees.

[83] Disney also broadened its adult offerings in film when then-Disney Studio Chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg acquired Miramax Films in 1993. That same year Disney created the NHL team the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, named after the 1992 hit film of the same name. Disney purchased a minority stake in the Anaheim Angels baseball team around the same time. [83] Wells was killed in a helicopter crash in 1994. [83] Shortly thereafter, Katzenberg resigned and formed DreamWorks SKG because Eisner would not appoint Katzenberg to Wells' now-available post (Katzenberg had also sued over the terms of his contract).

[83] Instead, Eisner recruited his friend Michael Ovitz, one of the founders of the Creative Artists Agency, to be President, with minimal involvement from Disney's board of directors (which at the time included Oscar-winning actor Sidney Poitier, Hilton Hotels Corporation CEO Stephen Bollenbach, former U.S. Senator George Mitchell, Yale dean Robert A. M. Stern, and Eisner's predecessors Raymond Watson and Card Walker). Ovitz lasted only 14 months and left Disney in December 1996 via a "no fault termination" with a severance package of $38 million in cash and 3 million stock options worth roughly $100 million at the time of Ovitz's departure.

The Ovitz episode engendered a long-running derivative suit, which finally concluded in June 2006, almost 10 years later. Chancellor William B. Chandler III of the Delaware Court of Chancery, despite describing Eisner's behavior as falling "far short of what shareholders expect and demand from those entrusted with a fiduciary position..." found in favor of Eisner and the rest of the Disney board because they had not violated the letter of the law (namely, the duty of care owed by a corporation's officers and board to its shareholders).

[103] Eisner later said, in a 2016 interview with The Hollywood Reporter, that he regretted letting Ovitz go. [104] A view of downtown Celebration, Florida, a community that was planned by the Walt Disney Company. In 1994, Eisner attempted to purchase NBC from General Electric (GE), but the deal failed due to GE wanting to keep 51 percent ownership of the network. On August 1, 1995, Disney announced a $19 billion merger of equals with Capital Cities/ABC Inc., which at the time was the second largest corporate takeover.

The merger would bring broadcast network ABC and its assets, including a 37.5% minority stake in A&E Television Networks, an 80 percent majority stake in ESPN and the Limited Partnership-ran DIC Productions into the Disney umbrella. [83] The deal was closed on February 10, 1996, and Eisner felt that the purchase of ABC was an important investment to keep Disney surviving and allowing it to compete with international multimedia conglomerates. [105] Disney lost a $10.4 million lawsuit in September 1997 to Marsu B.V.

over Disney's failure to produce as contracted 13 half-hour Marsupilami cartoon shows. Instead, Disney felt other internal "hot properties" deserved the company's attention. [106] Disney, which had taken control of the Anaheim Angels in 1996, purchased a majority stake in the team in 1998. That same year, Disney began a move into the Internet field with the purchase of Starwave and 43 percent of Infoseek.

In 1999, Disney purchased the remaining shares of Infoseek and launched the Go Network portal in January. Disney also launched its cruise line with the christening of Disney Magic and a sister ship, Disney Wonder. [83] The Katzenberg case dragged on as his contract included a portion of the film revenue from ancillary markets forever. Katzenberg had offered $100 million to settle the case, but Eisner felt the original claim amount of about half a billion too much, but then the ancillary market clause was found.

Disney lawyers tried to indicate a decline situation which reveal some of the problems in the company. ABC had declining rating and increasing costs while the film segment had two film failures. While neither party revealed the settlement amount, it is estimated at $200 million.

[83] The Disney Magic of the Disney Cruise Line at Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. Eisner's controlling style inhibited efficiency and progress according to some critics, while other industry experts indicated that "age compression" theory led to a decline in the company's target market due to youth copying teenage behavior earlier.

[83] The year 2000 brought an increase in revenue of 9 percent and net income of 39 percent with ABC and ESPN leading the way and Parks and Resorts marking its sixth consecutive year of growth. In November 2000, Andy Heyward purchased back DIC Entertainment from Disney (through investment by Bain Capital and Chase Capital Partners) and making the studio re-independent. [107] On July 23, 2001, Disney announced to purchase Fox Family Worldwide for $2.9 billion cash plus $2.3 billion in debt assumption, which would include ownership in the Fox Family Channel alongside other assets including the Saban Entertainment library and Fox Kids channels in Europe and Latin America.

[108] The purchase was completed on October 24, 2001, and Fox Family would be renamed to ABC Family in November. The year 2001 was one of cost-cutting, laying off 4,000 employees, Disney parks operations decreased, slashing annual live-action film investment, and minimizing Internet operations, mainly due to the September 11 attacks, which led to a decline in vacation travel and the early 2000s recession led to a decrease in ABC revenue.

While 2002 revenue had a small decrease from 2001 with the cost-cutting, net income rose to $1.2 billion with two creative film releases. In 2003, Disney became the first studio to record over $3 billion in worldwide box office receipts. [83] Eisner did not want the board to renominate Roy E.

Disney, the son of Disney co-founder Roy O. Disney, as a board director citing his age of 72 as a required retirement age. Stanley Gold responded by resigning from the board and requesting the other board members oust Eisner. [83] On November 30, 2003, Disney resigned from his positions as the company's vice chairman and chairman of Walt Disney Feature Animation, [ChWDC 1] accusing Eisner of micromanagement, failures with the ABC television network, timidity in the theme park business, turning the Walt Disney Company into a "rapacious, soul-less" company, and refusing to establish a clear succession plan, as well as a string of box office film flops starting in the year 2000.

On August 9, 2002, Disney said it was expressing great interest in buying Universal Studios whose parent company Vivendi started a bidding war after inheriting $17.9 billion in debt by its purchase of the famed major film studio from Seagram for $34 billion. [109] In addition, Universal Orlando's Islands of Adventure was struggling to deal with catastrophically low attendance since the park's opening in 1999, and the September 11 attacks in 2001 caused a dip of Universal Parks and Resorts' tourism attendance worldwide.

As a result, Vivendi lacked the interest in investing in the Universal parks more meaningfully and may have been one of the reasons for selling off Universal. [110] Analysts speculated that Universal would have to be available at a bargain price to justify such a deal. "Owning more theme parks could make Disney even more cyclical because that's a cyclical business," said Katherine Styponias of Prudential Securities. [109] Despite this, Disney didn't succeed in pursuing a takeover for various reasons, owing to its stock price at a 52-week-low and the likelihood of the Disney/Universal deal being blocked on antitrust grounds (e.g.

less innovation in theme parks, higher prices for hotel rooms, the growing power of box office market share, etc.). [110] The Muppets Studio, a subsidiary of Disney On May 15, 2003, Disney sold their stake in the Anaheim Angels baseball team to Arte Moreno. Disney purchased the rights to The Muppets and the Bear in the Big Blue House franchises from The Jim Henson Company on February 17, 2004.

[111] The two brands were placed under control of the Muppets Holding Company, LLC, a unit of Disney Consumer Products. [112] In 2004, Pixar Animation Studios began looking for another distributor after its 12-year contract with Disney ended, due to its strained relationship over issues of control and money with Eisner.

Also that year, Comcast Corporation made an unsolicited $54 billion bid to acquire Disney. A couple of high budget films flopped at the box office. With these difficulties and with some board directors dissatisfied, Eisner ceded the board chairmanship. [83] On March 3, 2004, at Disney's annual shareholders' meeting, a surprising 45 percent of Disney's shareholders, predominantly rallied by former board members Roy Disney and Stanley Gold, withheld their proxies to re-elect Eisner to the board.

Disney's board then gave the chairmanship position to Mitchell. However, the board did not immediately remove Eisner as chief executive. [ChWDC 2] In February 2005, Disney sold the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim hockey team to Henry and Susan Samueli, who later renamed the team the Anaheim Ducks. [83] On March 13, 2005, Robert A. Iger was announced as Eisner's successor as CEO. Also that month, Miramax co-founders Bob Weinstein and Harvey Weinstein departed the company to form their own studio.

On July 8, Walt Disney's nephew, Roy E. Disney, returned to the company as a consultant and as non-voting director emeritus. Walt Disney Parks and Resorts celebrated the 50th anniversary of Disneyland Park on July 17 and opened Hong Kong Disneyland on September 12.

On July 25, Disney announced that it was closing DisneyToon Studios Australia in October 2006 after 17 years of existence. [113] On September 30, Eisner resigned both as an executive and as a member of the Board of Directors. [ChWDC 3] 2005–2020: Bob Iger's leadership and company expansion Team Disney Burbank, which houses the offices of Disney's CEO and several other senior corporate officials On October 1, 2005, Bob Iger replaced Eisner as Disney's CEO.

On November 4, Walt Disney Feature Animation released Chicken Little, the company's first film using 3D animation. On January 23, 2006, it was announced that Disney would purchase Pixar in an all-stock transaction valued at $7.4 billion.

The deal was finalized on May 5; Steve Jobs, who was Pixar's CEO and held a 50.1% ownership stake in the company, transitioned to Disney's board of directors as its largest individual shareholder, with a 7 percent stake. [114] [115] Ed Catmull took over as President of Pixar Animation Studios. Former executive vice-president of Pixar, John Lasseter, became chief creative officer of Walt Disney Animation Studios, its division Disneytoon Studios, and Pixar Animation Studios, as well as assuming the role of principal creative advisor at Walt Disney Imagineering.

[115] In February 2006, Disney acquired the rights to Oswald the Lucky Rabbit from NBC Universal (including the character's intellectual property and the 27 Oswald cartoons produced by Walt Disney) as part of an exchange of minor assets. In return, Disney released sportscaster Al Michaels from his contracts with ABC Sports and ESPN, so he could join NBC Sports and his long-time partner John Madden for NBC's new NFL Sunday Night Football.

[116] In April 2007, the Muppets Holding Company was moved from Disney Consumer Products to the Walt Disney Studios division and renamed The Muppets Studio, as part of efforts to re-launch the division. [117] [111] In February 2007, the company was accused of human rights violations regarding the working conditions in factories that produce their merchandise.

[118] [119] Lucasfilm, a subsidiary of Disney. On August 31, 2009, Disney announced a deal to acquire Marvel Entertainment for $4.24 billion, in a deal completed on December 31, 2009. [120] [121] Director Emeritus Roy E. Disney died of stomach cancer on December 16, 2009. At the time of his death, he owned roughly 1 percent of Disney stock, which amounted to 16 million shares. He was the last member of the Disney family to be actively involved in the company.

[122] In October 2009, Disney Channel president Rich Ross, hired by Iger, replaced Dick Cook as chairman of the company and, in November, began restructuring the company to focus more on family friendly products.

Later in January 2010, Disney decided to shut down Miramax after downsizing Touchstone, but one month later, they instead began selling the Miramax brand and its 700-title film library to Filmyard Holdings. In March, ImageMovers Digital, which Disney had established as a joint venture studio with Robert Zemeckis in 2007, was shut down. In April 2010, Lyric Street, Disney's country music label in Nashville, was shut down. The following month, Haim Saban reacquired the Power Rangers franchise, including its 700-episode library.

[123] In September 2012, Saban reacquired the Digimon franchise, which, like Power Rangers, was part of the Fox Kids library that Disney acquired in 2001. [124] In January 2011, Disney Interactive Studios was downsized. [125] In April 2011, Disney broke ground on Shanghai Disney Resort.

Costing $4.4 billion, the resort opened on June 16, 2016. [126] Later, in August 2011, Bob Iger stated on a conference call that after the success of the Pixar and Marvel purchases, he and the Walt Disney Company are looking to "buy either new characters or businesses that are capable of creating great characters and great stories." [127] Later, in early February 2012, Disney completed its acquisition of UTV Software Communications, expanding their market further into India and Asia.

[128] On October 30, 2012, Disney announced plans to acquire Lucasfilm in a deal valued at $4.05 billion. Disney announced an intent to leverage the Star Wars franchise across its divisions, and planned to produce a seventh installment in the main film franchise for release in 2015. [129] [130] The sale was completed on December 21, 2012. [131] On March 24, 2014, Disney acquired Maker Studios, an active multi-channel network on YouTube, for $500 million. [132] The company was later turned into a new venture called Disney Digital Network in May 2017.

[133] On February 5, 2015, it was announced that Tom Staggs had been promoted to COO. [134] On April 4, 2016, Disney announced that Staggs and the company had mutually agreed to part ways, effective May 2016, ending his 26-year career with the company. [135] In August 2016, Disney acquired a 33 percent stake in BAMTech, a streaming media provider spun out from Major League Baseball's media division.

The company announced plans to eventually use its infrastructure for an ESPN over-the-top service. [136] [137] In September 2016, Disney considered purchasing the American online news and social networking service Twitter, [138] [139] but they dropped out partly due to concerns over abuse and harassment on the service.

[140] [141] [142] On March 23, 2017, Disney announced that Iger had agreed to a one-year extension of his term as CEO through July 2, 2019, and had agreed to remain with the company as a consultant for three years after stepping down. [143] [144] In August 2017, Disney announced that it had exercised an option to increase its stake in BAMTech to 75 percent, and would launch a subscription video-on-demand service featuring its entertainment content in 2019, which will replace Netflix as the subscription VOD rights holder of all Disney theatrical film releases.

[145] [146] In November 2017, Lasseter announced that he was taking a six-month leave of absence from Pixar and Disney Animation after acknowledging "missteps" in his behavior with employees in a memo to staff.

According to various news outlets, Lasseter had a history of alleged sexual misconduct towards employees. [147] [148] The entrance to the Fox Studios lot. In November 2017, it was reported by CNBC that Disney had been in negotiations to acquire 21st Century Fox. The negotiations had reportedly resumed around Disney acquiring several of Fox's key media assets.

Rumors of a nearing deal continued on December 5, 2017, with additional reports suggesting that the FSN regional sports networks would be included in the resulting new company (assets that would likely be aligned with Disney's ESPN division). [149] [150] [151] [152] On December 14, Disney agreed to acquire most assets from 21st Century Fox, including 20th Century Fox, for $52.4 billion. [153] The merger included many of Fox's entertainment assets—including filmed entertainment, cable entertainment, and direct broadcast satellite divisions in the UK, Europe, and Asia [154]—but excluded divisions such as the Fox Broadcasting Company, Fox Television Stations, the Fox News Channel, the Fox Business Network, Fox Sports 1 and 2, and the Big Ten Network, all of which were to be spun off into an independent company before the merger was complete (which eventually named Fox Corporation).

[155] The following June, after a counter offer from Comcast worth $65 billion, Disney increased its offer to $71.3 billion. [156] The transaction officially closed on March 20, 2019. [157] [158] Under the terms of acquisition, Disney will phase-out Fox brand usage by 2024. [159] Beginning in March 2018, a strategic reorganization of the company saw the creation of two business segments, Disney Parks, Experiences and Products and Direct-to-Consumer & International.

Parks & Consumer Products was primarily a merger of Parks & Resorts and Consumer Products & Interactive Media. While Direct-to-Consumer & International took over for Disney International and global sales, distribution and streaming units from Disney-ABC TV Group and Studios Entertainment plus Disney Digital Network. [160] Given that CEO Iger described it as "strategically positioning our businesses for the future", The New York Times considered the reorganization done in expectation of the 21st Century Fox purchase.

[161] 2020–present: Bob Chapek's leadership and COVID-19 pandemic See also: Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on The Walt Disney Company On February 25, 2020, Disney named Bob Chapek as CEO to succeed Iger, effective immediately.

Iger assumed the role of Executive Chairman, under which he would oversee the creative side of the company, while also continuing to serve as Chairman of the Board during the transition period through 2021.

[162] [163] In April 2020, Iger resumed operational duties of the company as executive chairman to help the company during the COVID-19 pandemic and Chapek was appointed to the board of directors.

[164] [165] Also in the month, the company announced that it would suspend pay to more than 100,000 employees ("cast members") at Disney Parks, Experiences and Products in response to the COVID-19 recession—reportedly amounting to monthly savings of $500 million for the company—while continuing to provide full healthcare benefits.

Reportedly, staff in the United States and France were affected and were encouraged to apply for government support. [166] Parade route in Tokyo Disneyland during COVID-19 pandemic in Japan.

Due to the closure of Disney parks during the COVID-19 pandemic, Disney experienced a 63 percent drop in earnings for the fiscal second quarter of 2020, resulting in a loss of $1.4 billion for the company. Additionally, the Parks, Experiences, and Products division experienced a loss of $1 billion in revenue.

[167] In September 2020, the company announced that it will be laying off 28,000 employees in Florida and California. According to Disney's park chairman, Josh D'Amaro, "We initially hoped that this situation would be shortlived and that we would recover quickly and return to normal. Seven months later, we find that has not been the case." According to D'Amaro, two-thirds of the employees reported to be laid off were part-time workers. [168] Then in November, Disney planned to cut 4000 jobs more than announced until the end of March 2021.

[169] In December 2020, Disney named Alan Bergman as chairman of its Disney Studios Content division to oversee its film studios. [170] In March 2021, Disney announced a new division, 20th Television Animation, that would focus on adult animation. [171] In July 2021, Disney announced that over an 18-month period it would move about 2,000 employees from its California headquarters to a new campus in Lake Nona, Orlando, Florida, to consolidate operations and take advantage of a more "business-friendly climate".

[172] On March 10, 2022, Disney announced that it will pause all business operations in Russia due the country's invasion of Ukraine and the humanitarian crisis it has caused. [173] Disney was the first major Hollywood studio to halt the release of a major motion picture due to Russia's invasion, and other movie studios such as Warner Bros.

Pictures and Sony Pictures followed soon after. [174] Through February and March 2022, Disney's response to a Florida bill prohibiting discussion in schools about gender and sexual identity ( HB 1557, known as the "Don't Say Gay" bill) led to controversy over the company's lack of condemnation and previous restrictions on LGBT content, eventually leading to a rare walkout by employees.

[175] Company units For a more comprehensive list, see List of assets owned by The Walt Disney Company. The Walt Disney Company operates six primary business segments (two primary divisions and four content groups): [176] Divisions • Disney Media and Entertainment Distribution (DMED) [177] is responsible for all global distribution, operations, sales, advertising, data, and technology functions for the company's four content production groups (listed below), as well as management of the company's direct-to-consumer businesses, including its multiple streaming services ( Disney+, Hulu, and ESPN+), theatrical exhibition unit, home media distribution, Disney Music Group, and domestic television networks.

[176] [178] The division is led by Kareem Daniel. [176] • Disney Parks, Experiences, and Products (DPEP) includes the company's theme parks, cruise line, travel-related assets, consumer products, and publishing divisions. Disney's resorts and diversified related holdings include: Walt Disney World, Disneyland Resort, Tokyo Disney Resort, Disneyland Paris, Hong Kong Disneyland Resort, Shanghai Disney Resort, Disney Vacation Club, Disney Cruise Line, and Adventures by Disney.

[179] The division is led by Josh D'Amaro. [176] Content groups • The Walt Disney Studios consists of the company's filmed entertainment and theatrical entertainment businesses, including Walt Disney Pictures, Walt Disney Animation Studios, Pixar, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, 20th Century Studios, Searchlight Pictures, Disneynature, and Disney Theatrical Group. The division is led by Alan Bergman. [176] • Disney General Entertainment Content (DGE) [177] consists of the company's entertainment-centric television channels and production companies in the United States, including Walt Disney Television (consisting of the ABC television network, Disney Television Studios – ABC Signature, 20th Television and 20th Television Animation – ABC Owned Television Stations and Freeform), Disney Branded Television, FX Networks, ABC News and 73% ownership of National Geographic Partners.

[180] The division also owns 50% of A&E Networks with Hearst Communications. The division is led by Peter Rice. [176] • ESPN and Sports Content focuses on ESPN's live sports programming, as well as sports news and original and non-scripted sports-related content, for the cable channels, ESPN+, and ABC. [181] The division is led by James Pitaro. [176] • International Content and Operations Group focuses on overseeing local and regional content that pipelined with global market through productions and operations for its streaming services.

The division is led by Rebecca Campbell. [182] In addition, Marvel Entertainment is a business reporting directly to the CEO; its financial results are primarily divided between the Studios and Consumer Products segments. [183] Leadership This section may contain an excessive amount of intricate detail that may interest only a particular audience.

Please help by spinning off or relocating any relevant information, and removing excessive detail that may be against Wikipedia's inclusion policy. ( April 2022) ( Learn how and when to remove this template message) Current Board of Directors • Susan Arnold (Chairman) • Mary Barra • Safra Catz • Amy Chang • Bob Chapek • Francis deSouza • Michael Froman • Maria Elena Lagomasino • Calvin McDonald • Mark Parker • Derica W.

Rice Executives • Bob Chapek, Chief Executive Officer • Alan Bergman, Chairman, Disney Studios Content • Rebecca Campbell, Chairman, International Content and Operations • Jennifer Cohen, Executive Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility • Josh D'Amaro, Chairman, Disney Parks, Experiences and Products • Kareem Daniel, Chairman, Disney Media and Entertainment Distribution • Horacio Gutierrez, Senior Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary • Dorothy Attwood, Senior Vice President, Global Public Policy • Susan Fox, Senior Vice President, Government Relations • Yvonne Pei, Senior Vice President, External Relations, Greater China • Alicia Schwarz, Senior Vice President and Chief Compliance Officer • Ronald L.

Iden, Senior Vice President and Chief Security Officer • Christine McCarthy, Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer • Carlos A. Gómez, Senior Vice President and Treasurer • Diane Jurgens, Executive Vice President, Enterprise Technology and Chief Information Officer • Alexia S.

Quadrani, Senior Vice President, Investor Relations • Brent Woodford, Executive Vice President, Controllership, Finance and Tax • James Pitaro, Chairman, ESPN and Sports Content • Peter Rice, Chairman, General Entertainment Content • Paul Richardson, Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer • Latondra Newton, Senior Vice President, Chief Diversity Officer • Kristina Schake, Executive Vice President, Global Communications Past leadership Executive chairmen • Bob Iger (2020–2021) Chairmen Walt Disney stepped down as chairman in 1960 to focus more on the creative aspects of the company, becoming the "executive producer in charge of all production." [184] After a four-year vacancy, Roy O.

Disney became chairman. • Walt Disney (1945–1960) • Roy O. Disney (1964–1971) • Donn Tatum (1971–1980) • Card Walker (1980–1983) • Raymond Watson (1983–1984) • Michael Eisner (1984–2004) • George J. Mitchell (2004–2006) • John E.

Pepper Jr. (2007–2012) • Bob Iger (2012–2021) • Susan Arnold (2022–present) Vice chairmen • Roy E. Disney (1984–2003) Presidents • Walt Disney (1923–1945) • Roy O. Disney (1945–1968) • Donn Tatum (1968–1971) • Card Walker (1971–1980) • Ron W.

Miller (1980–1984) • Frank Wells (1984–1994) • Michael Ovitz (1995–1997) • Bob Iger (2000–2012) Chief executive officers (CEO) • Roy O. Disney (1929–1971) • Donn Tatum (1971–1976) • Card Walker (1976–1983) • Ron W. Miller (1983–1984) • Michael Eisner (1984–2005) • Bob Iger (2005–2020) • Bob Chapek (2020–present) Chief operating officers • Card Walker (1968–1976) • Ron W.

Miller (1980–1984) • Frank Wells (1984–1994) • Sanford Litvack (1997–1999) [185] • Bob Iger (2000–2005) • Thomas O. Staggs (2015–2016) Financial data Revenues Annual gross revenues of the Walt Disney Company (in millions USD) Year Studio Entertainment [NI 1] Disney Consumer Products [NI 2] Disney Interactive Media [186] [187] Parks & Resorts [NI 3] Disney Media Networks [NI 4] Total Source 1991 2,593.0 724 2,794.0 6,111 [188] 1992 3,115 1,081 3,306 7,502 [188] 1993 3,673.4 1,415.1 3,440.7 8,529 [188] 1994 4,793 1,798.2 3,463.6 359 10,414 [189] [190] [191] 1995 6,001.5 2,150 3,959.8 414 12,525 [189] [190] [191] 1996 10,095 [NI 2] 4,502 4,142 [Rev 1] 18,739 [190] [192] 1997 6,981 3,782 174 5,014 6,522 22,473 [193] 1998 6,849 3,193 260 5,532 7,142 22,976 [193] 1999 6,548 3,030 206 6,106 7,512 23,435 [193] 2000 5,994 2,602 368 6,803 9,615 25,402 [194] 2001 7,004 2,590 6,009 9,569 25,790 [195] 2002 6,465 2,440 6,691 9,733 25,360 [195] 2003 7,364 2,344 6,412 10,941 27,061 [196] 2004 8,713 2,511 7,750 11,778 30,752 [196] 2005 7,587 2,127 9,023 13,207 31,944 [197] 2006 7,529 2,193 9,925 14,368 34,285 [197] 2007 7,491 2,347 10,626 15,046 35,510 [198] 2008 7,348 2,415 719 11,504 15,857 37,843 [199] 2009 6,136 2,425 712 10,667 16,209 36,149 [200] 2010 6,701 [NI 5] 2,678 [NI 5] 761 10,761 17,162 38,063 [201] 2011 6,351 3,049 982 11,797 18,714 40,893 [202] 2012 5,825 3,252 845 12,920 19,436 42,278 [203] 2013 5,979 3,555 1,064 14,087 20,356 45,041 [204] 2014 7,278 3,985 1,299 15,099 21,152 48,813 [205] 2015 7,366 4,499 1,174 16,162 23,264 52,465 [206] 2016 9,441 5,528 16,974 23,689 55,632 [207] 2017 8,379 4,833 18,415 23,510 55,137 [208] 2018 9,987 4,651 20,296 24,500 59,434 [209] Annual gross revenues of the Walt Disney Company (Re-segmented) (in millions USD) Year Studio Entertainment Direct-to-Consumer & International Parks, Experiences and Products Media Networks [NI 4] Total Source 2018 10,065 3,414 24,701 21,922 59,434 [210] 2019 11,127 9,349 26,225 24,827 69,570 [211] 2020 9,636 16,967 16,502 28,393 65,388 [212] Annual gross revenues of the Walt Disney Company (Re-segmented) (in millions USD) Year Media and Entertainment Distribution Parks, Experiences and Products Total Source 2021 50,866 16,552 67,418 [213] Disney ranked No.

55 in the 2018 Fortune 500 list of the largest United States corporations by total revenue. [214] • ^ Following the purchase of Capital Cities/ABC Inc.

Operating income Annual Operating income of the Walt Disney Company (in millions USD) Year Studio Entertainment [NI 1] Disney Consumer Products [NI 2] Disney Interactive Media [186] Parks and Resorts [NI 3] Disney Media Networks [NI 4] Total Source 1991 318 229 546 1,094 [188] 1992 508 283 644 1,435 [188] 1993 622 355 746 1,724 [188] 1994 779 425 684 77 1,965 [189] [190] 1995 998 510 860 76 2,445 [189] [190] 1996 1,596 [NI 2] −300 [NI 6] 990 747 3,033 [190] 1997 1,079 893 −56 1,136 1,699 4,312 [193] 1998 769 801 −94 1,288 1,746 4,079 [193] 1999 116 607 −93 1,446 1,611 3,231 [193] 2000 110 455 −402 1,620 2,298 4,081 [194] 2001 260 401 1,586 1,758 4,214 [195] 2002 273 394 1,169 986 2,826 [195] 2003 620 384 957 1,213 3,174 [196] 2004 662 534 1,123 2 169 4,488 [196] 2005 207 543 1,178 3,209 5,137 [197] 2006 729 618 1,534 3,610 6,491 [197] 2007 1,201 631 1,710 4,285 7,827 [198] 2008 1,086 778 −258 1,897 4,942 8,445 [199] 2009 175 609 −295 1,418 4,765 6,672 [200] 2010 693 677 −234 1,318 5,132 7,586 [201] 2011 618 816 −308 1,553 6,146 8,825 [202] 2012 722 937 −216 1,902 6,619 9,964 [203] 2013 661 1,112 −87 2,220 6,818 10,724 [204] 2014 1,549 1,356 116 2,663 7,321 13,005 [205] 2015 1,973 1,752 132 3,031 7,793 14,681 [206] 2016 2,703 1,965 3,298 7,755 15,721 [207] 2017 2,355 1,744 3,774 6,902 14,775 [208] 2018 2,980 1,632 4,469 6,625 15,706 [209] Annual Operating income of the Walt Disney Company (Re-segmented) (in millions USD) Year Studio Entertainment Direct-to-Consumer & International Parks, Experiences and Products Disney Media Networks Total Source 2018 3,004 −738 6,095 7,338 15,689 [210] 2019 2,686 −1,814 6,758 7,479 14,868 [211] 2020 2,501 −2,806 −81 9,022 8,108 [212] Annual Operating income of the Walt Disney Company (Re-segmented) (in millions USD) Year Media and Entertainment Distribution Parks, Experiences and Products Total Source 2021 7,295 471 7,766 [213] Criticism Main article: Criticism of The Walt Disney Company The Walt Disney Company has been criticized for the purportedly sexist, racist, or overly commercial artistic direction of certain pieces of its intellectual property.

It has also received criticism for offering poor pay and working conditions, engaging in anticompetitive practices, and treating animals poorly. See also • Disney portal • Animation portal • Film portal • Los Angeles portal • Companies portal • United States portal • Lists of films released by Disney • List of Disney television series • Disney University • Disneyfication • Buena Vista • Mandeville-Anthony v.

Walt Disney Co., a federal court case in which Mandeville claimed Disney infringed on his copyrighted ideas by creating Cars • List of conglomerates • List of acquisitions by Disney References Notes • ^ a b Also named Films and Film Entertainment • ^ a b c d Merged into Creative Content in 1996, merged into Consumer Products and Interactive Media in 2016, which merged with Parks & Resorts in 2018 • ^ a b Called Walt Disney Attractions (1989–2000) Walt Disney Parks and Resorts (2000–2005) Disney Destinations (2005–2008) Walt Disney Parks and Resorts Worldwide (2008–2018) • ^ a b c Broadcasting from 1994 to 1996 • ^ a b first year with Marvel Entertainment as part of results • ^ Not linked to WDIG, Disney reported a $300M loss due to financial modification regarding real estate Citations • ^ "2021 Proxy Statement – Revised" (PDF).

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Vintage Books. ISBN 9780679757474. Archived from the original on April 30, 2022. Retrieved April 28, 2022. • Kaufman, J.B.; Gerstein, David (2018). Mickey Mouse: The Ultimate History. Cologne: Taschen. ISBN 978-3836552844. Archived from the original on April 30, 2022. Retrieved April 28, 2022. • Krasniewicz, Louise (2010). Walt Disney: A Biography. ABC-CLIO.

ISBN 0313358303. Archived from the original on April 30, 2022. Retrieved April 28, 2022. • Rockefeller, J. D. (2016). The Story of Walt Disney. CreateSpace Independent When i grow up disney junior Platform. ISBN 978-1540401205. Archived from the original on April 30, 2022.

Retrieved April 26, 2022. • Susanin, Timothy (2011). Walt before Mickey: Disney's Early Years, 1919-1928. Diane Disney Miller. University Press of Mississippi. ISBN 1626744564. Archived from the original on April 27, 2022. Retrieved April 27, 2022. • Williams, Pat; Denney, James; Denney, Jim (2004). How to Be Like Walt: Capturing the Disney Magic Every Day of Your Life. Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications.

ISBN 978-0-7573-0231-2. Further reading • Disney Stories: Getting to Digital, Newton Lee and Krystina Madej (New York: Springer Science+Business Media, 2012), ISBN 978-1-4614-2100-9. • A View Inside Disney, Tayler Hughes, 2014 Slumped • Building a Company: Roy O. Disney and the Creation of an Entertainment Empire, Bob Thomas, 1998 • Building a Dream; The When i grow up disney junior of Disney Architecture, Beth Dunlop, 1996, When i grow up disney junior 0-8109-3142-7 • Cult of the Mouse: Can We Stop Corporate Greed from Killing Innovation in America?, Henry M.

Caroselli, 2004, Ten Speed Press • Disney: The Mouse Betrayed, Peter Schweizer • Disney A to Z (Fifth Edition) : The Official Encyclopedia, Dave Smith. 5th edition Disney Editions, 2016 ISBN 1-4847-3783-0. • The Disney Touch: How a Daring Management Team Revived an Entertainment Empire, by Ron Grover (Richard D. Irwin, Inc., 1991), ISBN 1-55623-385-X • The Disney Version: The Life, Times, Art and Commerce of Walt Disney, Richard Schickel, 1968, revised 1997 • Disneyana: Walt Disney Collectibles, Cecil Munsey, 1974 • Disneyization of Society: Alan Bryman, 2004 • DisneyWar, James B.

Stewart, Simon & Schuster, 2005, ISBN 0-684-80993-1 • Donald Duck Joins Up; the Walt Disney Studio During World War II, Richard Shale, 1982 • How to Read Donald Duck: Imperialist Ideology in the Disney Comic ISBN 0-88477-023-0 (Marxist Critique) Ariel Dorfman, Armand Mattelart, David Kunzle (translator).

• Inside the Dream: The Personal Story of Walt Disney, Katherine Greene & Richard Greene, 2001 • The Keys to the Kingdom: How Michael Eisner Lost His Grip, Kim Masters (Morrow, 2000) • The Man Behind the Magic; the Story of Walt Disney, Katherine & Richard Greene, 1991, revised 1998, ISBN 0-7868-5350-6 • Married to the Mouse, Richard E. Foglesorg, Yale University Press • Mouse Tales: A Behind-the-Ears Look at Disneyland, David Koenig, 1994, revised 2005, ISBN 0-9640605-4-X • Mouse Tracks: The Story of Walt Disney Records, Tim Hollis and Greg Ehrbar, 2006, ISBN 1-57806-849-5 • Storming the Magic Kingdom: Wall Street, the raiders, and the battle for Disney, John Taylor, 1987 New York Times • The Story of Walt Disney, Diane Disney Miller & Pete Martin, 1957 • Team Rodent, Carl Hiaasen.

• Walt Disney: An American Original, Bob Thomas, 1976, revised 1994, ISBN 0-671-22332-1 • Work in Progress by Michael Eisner with Tony Schwartz (Random House, 1998), ISBN 978-0-375-50071-8 Chronology of company • Polsson, Ken. "Chronology of the Walt Disney Company".

Retrieved December 15, 2013. • ^ Polsson, Ken. "2003". Chronology of the Walt Disney Company. KPolsson.com. Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. Retrieved December 15, 2013.

• ^ "2004". Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. Retrieved December 15, 2013. • ^ "2005". Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. Retrieved December 15, 2013. External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to The Walt Disney Company.

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Why limit celebrating the planet to just when i grow up disney junior day?

As part of Disney Planet Possible, the company's collective efforts to support a healthier planet for people and wildlife around the world, Disney is using the when i grow up disney junior of storytelling to connect viewers with the wonders of the world we share. All Earth Month long and beyond, you can find opportunities to connect, learn, and be inspired through film premieres, TV specials, content hubs, and nature-themed programming.

Take a look at the movies and shows families can enjoy to celebrate our planet throughout Earth Month on Disney's streaming services and TV networks: Polar Bear Every day is an adventure for this mother polar bear and her cubs. Narrated by two-time Academy Award nominee Catherine Keeneer, Disneynature's "Polar Bear" tells the story of a new mother, whose memories of her own youth prepare her to navigate motherhood in the increasingly challenging world polar bears face today.

Stream "Polar Bear" on Disney+ starting on Earth Day, Friday, April 22. In honor of the film, Disneynature and the Disney Conservation Fund are supporting Polar Bears International's efforts to help protect polar bear mothers, cubs, and their Arctic home. Learn more about Disney's work with Polar Bears International. The Disney+ Earth Day special "Explorer: The Last Tepui," from National Geographic, follows elite climber Alex Honnold and a world-class climbing team led by National Geographic Explorer and climber Mark Synnott on a grueling mission deep in the Amazon jungle as they attempt a first-ascent climb up a 1,000-foot sheer cliff.

Their goal is to deliver legendary biologist and National Geographic Explorer Bruce Means to the top of a massive "island in the sky" known as a tepui to search for undiscovered species. This Earth Day, learn why the tepuis - much like the Galapagos - are a treasure trove of biodiversity worth protecting. "Explorer: The Last Tepui" streams April 22 only on Disney+.

This Disney+ Earth Day special from National Geographic is based on the 2018 award-winning documentary that tells the story of John and Molly Chester, who abandon their urban life in Los Angeles to live on a barren farm and grow delicious food in harmony with nature in Ventura County. "The Biggest Little Farm: The Return" follows the farmers' 10-year tireless journey as they transform the land into a magical working farm and document the process.

This Earth Day, see how the farmers utilize the interconnectedness of nature to help build soil health, maximize biodiversity, and regeneratively grow the most nutrient-dense food possible. Stream it only on Disney+ when i grow up disney junior it premieres on Earth Day. Secrets of the Whales Dive deep into the epicenter of whale culture, where you'll learn that whales are far more complex and similar to humans than we ever imagined.

When i grow up disney junior Academy Award-winning filmmaker and conservationist James Cameron and narrated by Sigourney Weaver, "Secrets of the Whales" invites viewers to experience the extraordinary communication skills and intricate social structures of five different whale species. The Emmy-Award winning series unveils new science and technology to spotlight whales as they make lifelong friendships, teach clan heritage and traditions to their young, and grieve deeply for the loss of loved ones.

All four episodes of "Secrets of the Whales" will air on National Geographic and Nat Geo WILD for the first time on Earth Day beginning at 7pm ET. Branching Out: A Nat Geo Earth Day Adventure This Earth Day special from National Geographic and ABC Localish follows ABC News' Chief Meteorologist Ginger Zee, her city-loving husband Ben Aaron, and their two kids on an eco-friendly road trip to amazing nature destinations across America.

From treetops to beaches, this family discovers new ways to explore and restore our planet with National Geographic Explorers along the journey. Stream the special on National Geographic's YouTube channel and ABC's Localish Network starting on April 18, and catch it on local ABC TV stations, ABC.com, and Hulu Live during Earth Week.

Disney Animals: In the Funhouse Disney Animals: In the Funhouse shorts take kids and families on a wild ride around the world to explore Disney Animals in their habitats.

In April, two new shorts will premiere on Disney Junior YouTube and DisneyNOW. The "Trees" episode aired on Tuesday, April 5, and the "Farm" episode will premiere on Tuesday, April 26.

Additionally, Disney Animals shorts will be live streamed globally from Monday, April 18, through Saturday, April 30, on Disney Junior YouTube. In a new Big City Greens episode, Tilly and Bill set off on an epic journey to recycle a fluorescent light bulb at an e-waste center. This special Earth Day episode will play on Disney Channel and Disney XD throughout the month of April and is also available on-demand on DisneyNOW and Disney+.

LEGO Marvel Avengers: Climate Conundrum In this series from LEGO Marvel Avengers, when Tony Stark's new weather machine is stolen by villains at AIM, it's up to Black Widow and Hawkeye to retrieve it, taking them on a high-speed chase through New York City. Families can watch all four episodes of "LEGO Marvel Avengers: Climate Conundrum" on Disney XD. And there's more where that came from - Disney+, Hulu, and DisneyNOW are home to a wide range of movies, series, and specials for nature lovers.

Themed programming can be found in Disney+'s Earth Month collection, Hulu's Earth Day collection, and DisneyNOW's Planet Possible collection. Get inspired to picture what's possible for the future of our planet this Earth Month with these awesome stories from around the world, and let us know your favorites in the comments!Hi there!

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