Arm curl

arm curl

Malcolm Tatum Last Modified Date: April 22, 2022 Malcolm Tatum Date: Arm curl 22, 2022 Dumbbells are used to strengthen the biceps and other arm muscles. Arm curls are one of the most basic of weightlifting exercises. Requiring nothing more than a simple set of dead weights, arm curl curls can be performed at the gym, at the office, or in the home.

There are several different types of arm curls that can be used to strengthen the biceps and other muscles in the arm. One of the most common of all arm curl exercises is the one arm hammer curl. The stance for this type of curl involves standing with the back kept straight, the head held up, and the legs locked into a position that is even with the hips and shoulders. Beginning the curl involves starting with the weights held at arms length, with the palms in. As the weights are lifted past the hips, turn the palms upward.

Stop just after the weights are even with the top of the hips, and hold for a count of five. Slowly lower the weights back into the original position, turning the palms in. Remember to inhale as the weights are lifted up and exhale while lowering the weights. The biceps brachii is a muscle located in the upper arm that flexes the elbow joint during a various types of arm curls.

arm curl

The biceps curl is an example of arm curls that involve the muscles of the upper arm and to a lesser extent the muscles of the lower arm. Many weightlifting enthusiasts choose to perform this exercise in a sitting position. Generally, it is recommended that the seating be reclined slightly, although it is perfectly acceptable to do bicep curls in a straight chair. After several reps of arm curls, it is normal to feel some discomfort.

Performing the biceps curl involves holding a weight in each hand. As with the manner curl, the palms should be turned inward toward the arm curl. After sitting, place the feet so they are lined up with the shoulders. Begin by lifting one weight toward the shoulder, rotating the arm so the palm is now up.

Continue until the elbow is pointing toward the floor and the forearm is more or less vertical. Hold for a count of five, then lower the arm back into the arm curl position.

Repeat the process with the opposite arm. Light hand weights may be used for curls as well as other arm toning exercises. Some forms of the arm curl are intended to strengthen the forearm while others are more focused on strengthening the biceps or other muscles in the upper arm.

Many weightlifting experts recommend performing several different types of arm curls during a workout in order to properly develop all the muscles in the arm, including the wrist. Persons just beginning to work with free weight equipment should pay special attention to stance and position and go with smaller amounts of weight.

As strength and endurance increase, heavier weights can be utilized. Malcolm Tatum After many years in the teleconferencing industry, Michael decided to embrace his passion for trivia, research, and writing by becoming a full-time freelance writer. Since then, he has contributed articles to a variety of print and online publications, including Sports&Hobbies, and his work has also appeared in poetry collections, devotional anthologies, and several newspapers.

Malcolm’s other interests include collecting vinyl records, minor league baseball, and cycling. Malcolm Tatum After many years in the teleconferencing industry, Michael decided to embrace his passion for trivia, research, and writing by becoming a full-time freelance writer. Since then, he has contributed articles to a variety of print and online publications, including Sports&Hobbies, and his work has also appeared in poetry collections, devotional anthologies, and several newspapers.

Malcolm’s other interests include collecting vinyl records, minor league baseball, and cycling. You might also Like Readers Also Love 26 Incredibly Wealthy Hollywood Stars Can You Guess Which Team These Athletes Played For?

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If you want even bigger arms, do variations of the bicep curl. Small tweaks—something as simple as changing the wrist position or source of resistance—allow you to target your arms from new angles while emphasizing different muscles within your arms. Over time, that means more strength and more size. Here are 10 different ways to do a bicep curl.

Incorporate these bicep exercises into your arm workouts. And don’t be surprised if you feel a new type of soreness the next day. For bigger arms with greater muscle definition, make sure these essential moves have places in your . Read article 1.

Concentration Bicep Curls Why it works: Because it takes a lot of moving parts out of the equation, the concentration curl is one of the best moves to isolate the bicep muscle. How to do it: While sitting on a bench with your feet firmly on the floor, place the back of your left upper arm on the inside of your thigh. Keep your arm on your thigh throughout. Put your right hand on the right knee for stability. Do your curls on the left side, then repeat arm curl the right side. 2. Preacher Curls Why it works: Similar to concentration curls, preacher curls eliminate any momentum you can gain by swinging or twisting and puts the focus directly on your biceps.

You’ll get a great stretch at the bottom of the exercise, too. How to do it: Using a regular preacher bench, grab an EZ Curl bar with both hands using an underhand grip (palms facing upwards). Slowly curl the bar up to the top and bring it a few inches from your chin. Return the weight back down with a slow and controlled tempo to the starting position, allowing some resistance (negative) on the way back down.

Repeat the movement for the desired number of repetitions. 3. Hammer Curls Why it works: Hammer curls are a great way to strengthen your biceps and forearms while targeting the “outer head” of the biceps. How to do it: As you lower your arms, the dumbbell and wrist look like a hammer, thus the name. (The more you know, right?) Hold a set of dumbbells with a neutral grip so your palms are facing each other.

Curl the dumbbells while keeping your palms facing each other. 4. Spider Curls Why it works: Spider curls are incredible for building huge biceps. For one, similar to the preacher curl, you have to rest your triceps on a pad to prevent yourself from using momentum or swinging your body. Second, because of the starting position, you have to fight more gravity which gets you serious intensity. How to do it: Use the preacher curl machine backwards so that your triceps are resting on the straight-up-and-down side.

Start with your arms hanging straight down to the floor and curl. 5. Band Bicep Curl Why it works: Band-resisted exercises help you explode past sticking points.

During the bicep curl, for example, you engage the biceps more toward the top half of the movement than the bottom-half. By using a band, you can better match the strength curve of the movement because the resistance will be easiest at the bottom (when the muscle is fully stretched) and get harder as you rise. How to do it: Grab the end of an exercise band with each hand holding the middle of the band under your feet.

Perform your bicep curls. Beth Bischoff 6. Zottman Curl Why it works: This curl combines the conventional bicep curl and reverse curl for an awesome two-in-one movement. This way, you’ll target the biceps and brachialis with normal-style (wrists supinated) curls and also hammer your forearms with the reverse curl portion.

How to do it: Stand with a dumbbell in arm curl hand with palms facing forward. Curl the weights as you turn your wrists so that your palms face away at the top. Reverse the movement, returning to the starting position with your palms facing forward.

7. Cable Curl Why it works: At the beginning and end of a dumbbell or barbell curl, you move the weight about parallel to the floor and, thus, don’t fighting against gravity. Once you get into the middle range of the movement, you’re finally pulling against gravity. Because cables rely on a pulley system, however, you’ll get constant tension throughout the movement for consistent stimulus. How to do it: Attach a curl handle to the cable machine. Stand facing the machine and as close to the machine as you can.

Start with your arms at your sides and curl to the top. 8. Plate Curl Why it works: A great way to develop strong, massive forearms is to strengthen how hard your fingers can pinch together. Train this grip by varying the way you hold your weights. How to do it: Instead of doing a bicep curl with a dumbbell, use a weight plate and grab it by its end.

Do 5 – 6 sets of 4 – 8 reps; if you can arm curl more, use a heavier plate. 9. TRX Bicep Curl Why it works: With bodyweight exercises, all you have to do is change the angles to make it harder. Move closer to the anchor point on arm curl TRX bicep curl, for example, and you’ll instantly ramp up the intensity. They also lower your risk of an elbow or wrist injury from ugly technique or heavy machine work, and they break the monotony of the same boring exercises everyone else does.

How to do it: Grab a TRX and face the anchor point. Lean away, keep your body straight, and arm curl your upper arms at your sides. Then, curl the TRX towards you. To make this harder, move your feet closer to the anchor point. 10. Fat Grip Bicep Curl Why it works: With a thicker handle, you have to squeeze much harder just to hold the same amount of weight, which boosts your neural drive and activate more musculature. Also, because it strengths your grip, it allows you to hold more weight during conventional bicep exercises.

How to do it: Arm curl a Fat Grip around the dumbbell handle and perform your bicep curls. (If you don’t have a Fat Grip, wrap a small towel around the handle.) Want more?

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 You use these muscles anytime you pick something up, which is common throughout daily life. Doing the standing arm curl, you build strength in the upper arm and learn to use your arm muscles correctly, bracing with your core muscles.

• Begin standing tall with your feet about hip-width apart. Keep your abdominal muscles engaged.

arm curl

• Hold one dumbbell in each hand. Let your arms relax down at the sides of your body with palms facing forward. • Keeping your upper arms stable and shoulders relaxed, bend at the elbow and lift the weights so that the dumbbells approach your shoulders. Your elbows should stay tucked in close to your ribs.

Exhale while lifting. • Lower the arm curl to the starting position. • Do 8–10 curls, then rest and do one or two more sets. Improper Elbow Position The position of your elbows should not change during the curl. They should remain close to the side of your body and only the lower arm should move. If you notice your elbows moving away from your torso or floating in front or behind the body, you are probably lifting too much weight. • Bending at the elbow, lift one dumbbell toward your shoulder, rotating your arm as it moves up so that the palm with the dumbbell faces up during the movement and eventually faces the shoulder.

• Lower the weight to the starting position and perform the same movement with the other arm. • Continue to alternate until the set is complete.

Safety and Precautions This exercise is generally arm curl for most people. But if you have an arm injury or experience pain during the motion, do not continue. You can expect to feel fatigue and even burning in your biceps and forearm muscles after a few lifts, and this is desired to get your muscles to strengthen and grow.

However, do not force extra repetitions once you are unable to do the curls with good form.

arm curl

Take a rest before doing the next set. Sign Up You're in! Thank you, {{form.email}}, for signing up. There was an error. Please try again. • Fitness • Nutrition • What to Buy • News • Our Review Board • About Us • Editorial Process • Anti-Racism Pledge • Privacy Policy • In the News • Arm curl Policy • Advertise • Terms of Use • Careers • California Privacy Notice • Contact • EU Privacy When you visit this arm curl, it may store or retrieve information on your browser, mostly in the form of cookies.

Cookies collect information about your preferences and your device and are used to make the site work as you expect it to, to understand how you interact with the site, and to show arm curl that are targeted to your interests.

You can find out more and change our default settings with Cookie Settings. Fact checked by David Tran BSc There are countless curl variations that work the biceps muscle well. In fact, we tried over 50 different types of arm curls before coming up with our list of the best bicep curl variations. So if you want to know what the most effective bicep exercises are, then this guide is for you. You'll learn the optimal lifting technique for each movement as well as the specific region of the biceps that each exercise emphasizes.

Conclusion: Which bicep curl variations are the most effective? The 17 best types of bicep curls After experimenting with numerous variations of bicep curls, we created a list of the most effective muscle-building movements for the biceps. So be sure to add some of these curls to your next arm day if you want to grow your bis! 1. Hammer curl There are a number of hammer curl variations that you can do to build muscle. But the standing hammer curl is by far the most common type.

It's a classic curl variation that "hammers" the brachioradialis and brachialis in addition to the biceps. So if you're seeking to gain overall arm size, then make sure to include arm curl kind of hammer curl in your routine.

Since hammer curls put the brachioradialis and brachialis in strong force-producing positions, you can naturally lift more weight on this neutral-grip exercise than on regular curls. As such, hammer curls are an excellent exercise for gaining upper arm strength and training the fast-twitch muscle fibers (the fibers that grow the biggest). • Hold a pair of dumbbells by your sides with a neutral grip.

• Curl the weights toward your shoulders while keeping your elbows still. • Keep lifting the weights until your forearms make forceful contact with your biceps. • Hold the contraction for a moment at the top of the rep. • Lower the dumbbells back down under control until your elbows reach full extension. • Repeat for 3-5 sets of 6-10 reps. 2. Dumbbell curls Dumbbell arm curls are another classic bicep-builder that you can do to build strong, symmetrical biceps. Since you have to lift each weight independently when you curl with dumbbells, you can ensure that both of your arms are receiving roughly equal work and are thus growing at similar rates.

Compared to other types of dumbbell curls, the regular standing variation requires minimal equipment and setup time. As such, it's the ideal exercise to perform if you want to grow your biceps at home because all you need is a basic pair of weights and a arm curl workout space.

• Hold a pair of weights by your sides with a supinated (palms-up) grip. • Curl the weights toward your front delts while keeping your elbows and shoulders still. • Keep curling until the undersides arm curl your forearms press right up against your biceps. • Hold the contraction for a brief moment. • Lower the dumbbells under control until they're back by your sides.

• Repeat for 3-5 sets of 8-12 reps. 3. Preacher curls Preacher EZ bar curls target the short head of the biceps by having you curl with your arms in front of your torso. This helps to build the inner part of your biceps, which is the area that people generally see which you flex your arms. Therefore, preacher curls are particularly effective for competitive bodybuilders and anyone else who likes to show off their hard work in the gym.

Arm curl some of the other more advanced bicep curls variations, preacher curls are remarkably beginner-friendly (but no less effective for building mass). This is because when your arms are braced against the preacher pad, you can't use momentum to swing the weight up.

As a result, your biceps are completely isolated and thus have to handle virtually all of the resistance by themselves, which ultimately leads to more muscle growth.

• Place an EZ bar in a arm curl curl rack and load some weights onto either side. • Sit on the preacher curl station's seat and then grab the bar with a shoulder-width underhand grip. • Curl the bar toward your shoulders until your forearms make firm contact with your biceps. • Hold the contraction for a moment, and then lower the bar back down until your elbows are fully locked out.

• Perform 3-5 sets of 8-12 reps. 4. Barbell arm curl Out of the many different types of bicep curls, the BB curl exercise may well just be the best mass-builder of the lot. This is the case for two reasons. First off, barbell curls train both bicep functions (elbow flexion and forearm supination) simultaneously and optimally, and they do so throughout the whole duration of the rep. Second, curling with a straight bar enables you to overload your biceps with more resistance than when you curl with dumbbells.

And, all else being equal, lifting heavier weights will trigger more muscle growth. The downside, of course, is that you might develop muscular imbalances if you perform barbell curls exclusively. Therefore, your best bet arm curl building overall bicep size and symmetry is to include different bicep curls in your routine that use both dumbbells and bars.

• Load some arm curl onto a straight bar and grab it with a shoulder-width underhand grip. • Curl the bar toward your chest while keeping your elbows stationary. • Keep lifting the weight until your forearms push right up against your biceps. • Squeeze your biceps forcefully at the top of the rep. • Lower the bar back down until your elbows reach full extension.

• Repeat for 3-5 sets of 6-12 reps. 5. Concentration curls Learning how to do concentration curls properly will help you to build arm curl that are not only big and strong but symmetrical too.

Unlike with other dumbbell curl variations, you're training each arm separately when you perform concentration curls. This means that your brain only has to focus on moving one limb at a time, and so you don't have to split the neurological resources of your central nervous system over two arms. In other words, you can dedicate 100% of your body's available strength, arm curl, and effort to working each individual bicep. So if you have some significant size or strength disparities between your biceps—or if you want to prevent them from cropping up in the future—make sure to perform some dumbbell curls variations that let you train each arm separately.

• Grab a dumbbell with an underhand grip and then sit on the edge of a weight bench. • Bend over slightly and then rest the arm that's holding the weight on the inside of your thigh.

• Hold onto your other knee with your spare arm for support. • Let your arm fully extend so that the dumbbell is close to the floor. • Curl the weight toward your shoulder until the underside of your forearm makes firm contact with your biceps.

• Squeeze your biceps as hard as you can at the top of the rep (when you can't lift the weight any higher without your elbow coming off your thigh).

• Lower the weight under control until your arm is once again locked out. • Repeat with your other arm and do 3-5 sets of 10-15 reps per side. 6. Zottman curls The Zottman curl is one of the best dumbbell curls for building the upper arms and forearms. Unlike some of the other different types of dumbbell curls, Zottman curls train the brachialis and brachioradialis in addition to the biceps.

Essentially, you're performing a regular curl during the concentric phase of the rep followed by a reverse curl during the eccentric portion of the rep.

This enables you to overload your brachialis and brachioradialis during the eccentric—with more resistance than reverse curls—because you can curl more weight with a supinated grip (during the concentric) than with a pronated grip. • Hold a pair of dumbbells by your sides with a thumbless supinated grip. • Curl the weights toward your shoulders until your forearms and biceps make forceful contact.

• Rotate your hands into a pronated (palms-down position) at the top of the rep. • Lower the weights back down with this new overhand grip. • Turn your hands back to their original supinated position once your elbows are locked out.

• Perform 3-5 sets of 8-15 reps. 7.

arm curl

Spider curls While there are many different kinds of bicep curls that you can do to build muscle, few variations are capable of mimicking the intense peak contraction and muscle pump that the DB spider curl produces. This is because spider curls train your biceps at a very short muscle length, which is to say when your arms are in front of your body and your shoulders and thus in flexion.

As a rule of thumb, bicep curl variations that have you lift the weight in front of your body produce a stronger contraction, a more intense pump, and also emphasize the sort (inner) head of the biceps. So if you want your arms to look pumped up and vascular while you're training, make sure to include arm curl curls arm curl similar types of bicep curls in your routine.

arm curl

• Set the back pad of an adjustable bench to 60 degrees. • Grab a pair of dumbbells with an underhand grip. • Sit on the bench in a reverse position with your torso pressed against the backrest.

• Let your arms extend in front of you. • Curl the weights toward your front delts while keeping your elbows and shoulders still. • Keep lifting the weights until the undersides of your forearms make firm contact with your biceps. • Squeeze your biceps forcefully at the top of the rep arm curl hold the peak contraction for a moment. • Slowly lower the weights back down until your arms are locked out. • Perform 3-5 sets of 10-15 reps.

8. Reverse curls Out of all the dumbbell bicep curl variations, it's reverse grip bicep curls that are most effective for building the brachialis and brachioradialis muscles. This is because curling with an overhand grip places the biceps at a mechanical disadvantage. Therefore, since the biceps arm curl produce much force in this position, the brachialis and brachioradialis have to take over the reins and do most of the lifting; hence these two muscles get arm curl great workout from reverse curls.

Since the arm curl lies deeper in the arm musculature than the biceps, making it bigger can actually help to push your biceps out and make them appear more peaked. So if you want to develop an aesthetic pair of arms, then reverse curls should be staple curl variation in your workouts. • Load some weights onto a barbell and then grab the bar with a thumbless-overhand grip arm curl inside shoulder-width.

• Curl the bar toward your chest while keeping your shoulders and elbows still. • Keep curling until the tops of your forearms push right up against your biceps. • Hold the peak contraction for a moment. • Lower the bar under control until your elbows reach full extension. • Repeat for 3-5 sets of 10-20 reps. 9. Incline curls Incline dumbbell curls are one of the best types of bicep curls for developing the long head because they have you curl with the weights behind your hips.

Lifting the dumbbells like this naturally shifts more of the tension onto the outer muscle fibers arm curl the biceps. Developing this area will make your biceps look wider when viewed from the front (especially if your long head is lagging), as well as more peaked when viewed from behind in a flexed position.

• Position the backrest of a weight bench to between 45 and 60 degrees. • Grab a pair of dumbbells, and then sit on the bench with your back against the pad. • Let your arms hang slightly behind your torso and hips. • Curl the weights toward your shoulders while keeping your elbows stationary. • Keep lifting the weights until your forearms and biceps make forceful contact. • Squeeze your biceps as hard as you can and hold the peak contraction for a second.

• Slowly lower the dumbbells back down until your arms are locked out. • Repeat for 3-5 sets of 8-12 reps. 10. EZ bar curls Out of all the types of barbell curls, easy bar curls are the most joint-friendly. This is because EZ bars have semi-supinated grips rather than fully supinated grips. Therefore, you'll naturally minimize your injury risk by using an EZ bar because your wrists and forearms won't be forced into any unnatural or compromising positions.

The only downside is that EZ curls place slightly less tension on the biceps (but more on the brachialis and brachioradialis) than barbell curls because of the semi-supinated grips.

arm curl

However, the difference in muscle activation isn't significant to the point where you should force yourself to do barbell curls if you find them uncomfortable. • Load some weight onto an EZ bar.

For more convenience, consider using a preloaded bar. • Grab the bar with a shoulder-width underhand grip. • Curl the bar toward your chest until your forearms and biceps make firm contact with one another. • Squeeze your biceps forcefully at the top of the rep. • Lower the bar back down under control until your elbows reach full extension.

• Repeat for 3-5 sets of 8-15 reps. 11. Drag curls The barbell drag curl is one of the more old-school bicep curl variations that you can do to build your arms. Not only does this underrated exercise create an intense muscle pump, but it also shifts the tension onto the outer muscle fibers of the biceps by having you drag the bar right against your body and your elbows behind your torso. Just make sure to avoid shrugging the weight up with your traps.

While it's okay to feel some trap arm curl due to the fact that you're essentially rowing your elbows back as you curl, your biceps should still do most of the lifting. In this arm curl, drag curls are one of the best types of barbell curls for improving your mind-muscle connection because you really need to focus on squeezing your biceps to get the most from the exercise.

• Load some weights onto a barbell and let the bar rest against your thighs. • Drag the bar up your body by moving your hands toward your shoulders while simultaneously rowing your elbows behind your torso. • Squeeze your biceps forcefully as they make firm contact with the undersides of your forearms. • Hold the peak contraction for a moment. • Lower the bar back down under control until your elbows are almost locked out (you can use constant tension on drag curls if you're doing them as a finisher).

• Repeat for 3-5 sets of 10-20 reps.

arm curl

12. Cable curls Out of the many different types of bicep curls, low cable bicep curls make your muscles work harder than any other variation on a per rep basis.

This is because, unlike free weight curls, cable curls challenge your biceps with constant arm curl. So it's not like your biceps can rest at the bottom of a rep (like they can with dumbbells curls) because the pulley is always exerting some kind of force on your biceps. Cable curls are typically more joint-friendly than their free weight counterparts because the machine handles some of the stabilization for you.

If anything, this makes cable curls better for building muscle because you can dedicate 100% of your attention to simply stretching and squeezing your biceps rather than figuring out how to balance the weight. • Connect a straight bar attachment to a low pulley. • Grab the bar with an underhand grip. • Curl the bar toward your chest by flexing your biceps. • Squeeze your biceps forcefully as they make firm contact with the undersides of your forearms. arm curl Hold the contraction for a second, and then lower the bar under control until your elbows are locked out.

arm curl

• Perform 3-5 sets of 10-15 reps. 13. Seated curls The seated bicep curl is one of the best types of dumbbell curls for hypertrophy training because the sitting position dramatically reduces the exercise's core stability requirement; hence, you can focus purely on working your biceps.

To get the full benefit of this seated curl, however, you want to actually brace your back against the weight bench's backrest rather than just perch yourself on the edge of the bench. This is because the back pad helps to stabilize your core so that you can focus on training the target muscles rather than on constantly flexing your abs. • Set the backrest of an adjustable bench to a 90-degree angle (or somewhere close to it if your bench doesn't go fully upright). • Hold a pair of dumbbells with a supinated grip.

• Sit on the bench with your back against the pad. • Let the weights hang by your sides. • Curl the dumbbells toward your front delts while keeping your elbows and shoulders stationary. • Keep lifting the weights until your biceps and forearms make firm contact. • Squeeze your biceps at the top of the rep and hold the peak contraction for a second. • Lower the dumbbells back down to your sides in a controlled manner (don't just let the weights drop).

• Repeat for 3-5 sets of 6-12 reps. 14. Cross body curls Although there are many different bicep curls out there that can get you those arm gains, few variations enable you to lift as heavy as cross body dumbbell curls. This is because the cross body curl is a unilateral exercise. And so, when your brain only has to think about moving one arm, you can naturally lift heavier weights because your central nervous system can dedicate all of its strength and resources to contracting that particular bicep.

Also, since you're lifting the dumbbell across your body rather than toward your shoulder, the long head of your biceps has to do more of the work. So if you want to improve your peak, cross body hammer curls are one way to arm curl just that while also improving your bicep strength.

• Hold a pair of dumbbells by your sides with a neutral grip. • Lift one of the weights across your body toward your opposite shoulder. Keep your other arm completely still. • Keep curling until your forearms and biceps press up against each other. • Hold the peak contraction for a brief moment. • Lower the dumbbell back down to your side. • Repeat the motion with your other arm, and do 3-5 sets of 6-10 reps per side. 15. Kettlebell curls Now that you've seen all the different dumbbell curls that you can do, it's time to learn how doing curls with kettlebells can build your biceps.

Compared to dumbbell curl variations, kettlebell curls place less tension on the forearms. This is because kettlebells are easier to grip than dumbbells since the weighted part is under the handle (and thereby behind your hand when you hold it) rather than at the sides of arm curl handle as with dumbbells.

So if your forearms often fatigue before your biceps when you're curling, then kettlebell curls will help you to bias more of the tension toward the true target muscle; the biceps. • Hold a kettlebell in each hand with a supinated grip.

• Curl the kettlebells toward your shoulders while keeping your elbows as still as possible. • Squeeze your biceps as hard as you can as they make firm contact with your forearms at the top of the rep. • Hold arm curl contraction for a second. • Lower the kettlebells back down to your sides in a controlled manner until your elbows reach full extension.

• Repeat for 3-5 sets of 8-15 reps. 16. Resistance band bicep curls If you don't have the equipment to try all of the types of dumbbell curls but still want to grow your biceps, then the banded bicep curl is your best friend.

Not only do resistance band curls produce a skin-splitting pump that will make your arms look more vascular, but they're also incredibly joint-friendly since bands are easier to stabilize than free weights.

Additionally, bands are very affordable and highly portable. So if you're trying to make gains on a tight budget or if you don't have much space to work out, resistance bands are just about the best piece of equipment you can buy—especially when it comes to the biceps and upper body.

If you only have access to light bands, then you can double loop the band to increase the resistance. • Grab the band handles with a supinated grip and then stand in the middle of the band. • Curl the handles toward your front delts while keeping your arm curl as still as possible. • Squeeze your biceps forcefully as they push up arm curl your forearms. • Hold the contraction for a second before lowering the handles back to your sides in a controlled manner.

• Repeat for 3-5 sets of 12-20 reps. 17. Plate bicep curls Plate curls are one of those types of bicep curls that few lifters ever perform but which can really build your biceps and, depending on how you do them, your brachialis and brachioradialis as well. To focus purely on your biceps, hold a weight plate in each hand and curl them up and down like you would during the different types of dumbbell curls.

If you want to do weight plate bicep curls to work your brachialis and brachioradialis as well, hold a larger weight disc by its sides with both of your hands and then curl it up and down. This variation makes an excellent finishing movement for fatiguing the arm curl muscle fibers in the front of your upper arms. • Hold a weight plate in each hand with a supinated grip. • While keeping your elbows still, curl the discs toward your shoulders. • Once the undersides of your forearms make forceful contact with your biceps, lower the plates back down in a slow and controlled manner.

• Repeat for 3-5 sets of 10-15 reps. Conclusion: Which bicep curl variations are the most effective? While any of the bicep curl variations that you saw above can build muscle, the best and most optimal type depends on which area of your arms you want to emphasize. For example, to put more tension on the long (outer) arm curl of your biceps, you want to curl with your arms slightly behind your torso, in which case incline curls and drag curls would be your best bet.

Conversely, to focus on the short (inner) head of your biceps, you want to curl with your arms in arm curl of your body. So in this regard, movements like preacher curls and concentration curls would be optimal. Similarly, to maximally stimulate your brachialis and brachioradialis muscles, you need to put your biceps in a position of mechanical disadvantage in which they can't produce much force. So any exercise that uses a reverse grip—and, to a lesser extent, a neutral grip—is your best bet here.

James Jackson is a personal trainer who uses his expertise in strength and conditioning to create helpful workout tutorials that show fitness enthusiasts how to build muscle while staying safe in the gym. He draws on the latest sports science data as well as tried and tested training techniques to arm curl the best results for his clients without them having to live in the gym.

Critical Body is the premier resource for learning how a sustainable exercise regime can improve your long-term physical health and mental wellbeing. We create in-depth strength training tutorials so that fitness enthusiasts like you can make gains faster and avoid injury by lifting with the proper form.

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Home > Fitness Testing > Tests > Strength > Arm Curl Arm Curl (Bicep) Test The Arm Curl test is a test of upper body strength, and is part of the Senior Fitness Test (SFT) and the AAHPERD Functional Fitness Test, and is designed to test the functional fitness of seniors.

The test involves performing as many arm curls as possible in 30 seconds, while sitting in a chair. There are slight differences between the protocols for the Senior and AAHPERD tests, such as the weight arm curl for women.

The differences are indicated below. See also the maximum bicep curl test. purpose: This test measures upper body strength and endurance. equipment required: 4 pound weight (women, AAHPERD), 5 pound weight (women, SFT), 8 pound weight (for men).

A chair without armrests, stopwatch. pre-test: Explain the test procedures to the subject. Perform screening of health risks and obtain informed consent. Prepare forms and record basic arm curl such as age, height, body weight, gender, test conditions. Ensure that the participants are adequately warmed-up. See more details of pre-test procedures. procedure: The aim of this test is to do as many arm curls as possible in 30 seconds. This test is conducted on the dominant arm side (or stronger side).

The subject sits on the chair, holding the weight in the hand using a suitcase grip (palm facing towards the body) with the arm in a vertically down position beside the chair. Brace the upper arm against the body so that only the lower arm is moving (tester may assist to hold the upper arm steady). Curl the arm up through a full range of motion, gradually turning the palm up (flexion with supination). As the arm is lowered through the full range of motion, gradually return to the starting position.

The arm must be fully bent and then fully straightened at the elbow. The protocol for arm curl AAHPERD test describes the administrator's hand being placed on the biceps, and the lower arm must touch the tester's hand for a full bicep curl to be counted.

Repeat this action as many times as possible within 30 seconds. scoring: The score is the total arm curl of controlled arm curls performed in 30 seconds.

arm curl

Below is a table showing some recommended ranges for this test based on age groups (from Jones & Rikli, 2002). Men’s Results Age below average average above average 60-64 < 13 13 to 19 > 19 65-69 < 12 12 to 18 > 18 70-74 < 12 12 to 17 arm curl 17 75-79 < 11 11 to 17 > 17 80-84 < 10 10 to 16 > 16 85-89 < 10 10 to 15 > 15 90-94 < 8 8 to 13 > arm curl target population: the aged population which may not be able to do traditional fitness tests.

comments: It's important that the upper arm is stable throughout the test, and doesn't swing. references: • Anna Różańska-Kirschke, Piotr Kocur, Małgorzata Wilk, Piotr Dylewicz, The Fullerton Fitness Test as an index of fitness in the elderly, Medical Rehabilitation 2006; 10(2): 9-16.

• Jones C.J., Rikli R.E., Measuring functional fitness of older adults, The Arm curl on Active Aging, March April 2002, pp.

24–30. The Test in Action • This test is part of the Senior Fitness Test (SFT) and the AAHPERD Functional Fitness Test Similar Tests • See also the maximum bicep curl test which involves lifting a set weight as many times as possible.

Related Pages • A list of other strength tests • Read a discussion about testing the elderly • All about the Senior Fitness Test • Read about Fitness Testing for Specific Groups arm curl Special Populations Related Products • Buy the Senior Fitness Test Manual Testing Extra We have over 400 fitness tests listed, so it's not easy to choose the best one to use.

You should consider the validity, reliability, costs and ease of use for each test. Use our testing guide to conducting, recording, and interpreting fitness tests. Any questions, please ask or search for your answer. To keep up with the latest in sport science and this website, subscribe to our newsletter. We are also on facebook and twitter.
There are countless ways to workout your biceps. One of the most common biceps exercise is the bicep curl. We all now how boring this biceps exercise can be.

So we’ve reached out to the fitness experts to give you the many variations of the bicep curl. Now that there’s no excuse for any biceps-training regimen to be limited to the same old barbell and dumbbell variations.

If you arm curl to the same old exercises two things are bound to happen: Your results will plateau due to lack of imagination, and you’ll be bored out of your mind. That’s unacceptable! Your pipes should never be set on autopilot, and your biceps exercise should never be boring.

Arm curl time to make your biceps workouts fun and productive again, starting with these six versions of the classic bicep curl. Behind The Back Cable Curl Why Do It: “Because the arm is behind the body, this curl variation stretches the long head of the biceps [the head most responsible for giving the biceps its ‘peak’],” says Robert Ciresi Jr., a certified personal trainer based in Riverside, CA.

“A bigger stretch means a stronger contraction.” Do It: Attach two handles to the lowest pulley setting on a cable column. Facing away from the weight stack, grab the handles and step away from the stack a few feet. Start with your arms fully extended and back behind you. Keeping your upper arms stationary, curl the handles forward and up.

arm curl

Sets x Reps: 3 x 12–15. Dumbbell Drag Curl Why Do It: “The angle of the arms, which would be difficult to maintain without the use of an incline bench, forces the short head of the biceps to work superhard,” Ciresi says. “Development of the short head gives tremendous width to the biceps.” Do It: Lie facedown on an incline bench set to 45 degrees, holding a pair of dumbbells.

Start with your arms hanging straight down toward the floor, palms facing forward (supinated). Keeping your upper arms perpendicular with the floor, curl the dumbbells up and squeeze the contraction in your biceps at the top. Slowly lower back down to full elbow extension.

This exercise can also be performed one arm at a time, alternating sides every other rep. Sets x Reps: 2–3 x 12 reps. Barbell Drag Curl Why Do It: “This old-school arm curl torches the long head of the biceps muscle,” Ciresi says. He also notes that the reduced, focused range of motion better targets the biceps, since you’re squeezing harder.

Do It: Hold a barbell with a standard shoulder-width grip. Bend your arms and push your elbows back behind you to arm curl the bar straight up your body (unlike with a typical curl, in which the weight moves in an arc). Pull it as high up as possible, somewhere around your upper abs or lower chest, and squeeze your biceps for a count at the top.

Sets x Reps: 3 x 8–10 reps. Lying Cable Curl Why Do It: “Placing constant tension in the concentric and eccentric phases of the lift, the lying cable curl allows for maximum stability of the torso,” Ciresi says. “This lets you fully concentrate on isolating the biceps.” Do It: Clip a straight- or EZ-bar attachment to a pulley set low.

Grab the ends of the bar with a palms-up grip, then lie all the way back on the floor, faceup.

arm curl

Fully extend your arms straight down your body (parallel with the floor), then curl the bar up as high as possible, keeping your elbows in tight throughout. Hold the contraction for a count at the top, then slowly lower back down until arms are fully extended. Sets x Reps: 3 x 15 reps. High Cable Curl Why Do It: “High-cable curls pack a wallop due to the external rotation of the shoulder,” Ciresi says.

“In this position, the short head is forced arm curl perform the bulk of the lift. The constant tension that the cable provides would be difficult to achieve using a dumbbell.” Do It: Attach handles to the high pulleys on either side of a cable-crossover station. Grab the handles and stand between the pulleys with your arms extended and up. Keeping your upper arms stationary, curl the handles in to your ears.

Squeeze hard, then slowly return to the arms-extended position. You arm curl do these one arm at a time. Sets x Reps: 2–3 x 15–20 reps.

arm curl

Cable Preacher Hammer Curl Why Do It: “The hammer [neutral] hand position targets the brachialis muscle, which, when fully developed, greatly enhances the biceps peak,” Ciresi says. “The preacher bench stabilizes the arms to promote full isolation, and the cable provides constant tension throughout the lift.” Do It: Position a preacher curl bench a couple of feet in arm curl of a cable station. Hook a arm curl attachment to the low pulley, grab the ends of the rope with palms facing each other, and sit on the bench.

Start with the backs of your arms flush against the pad and your arms extended. Curl the weight up as high as possible. Sets x Reps: 3 sets x 12 reps.none




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