Naproxen sodium

naproxen sodium

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Naproxen sodium is an internal analgesic available in over-the-counter (OTC) medicines that temporarily relieves minor aches and pains and reduces fever.

It is part of a group of pain relievers and fever reducers called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Naproxen sodium can be the only ingredient in oral pain relievers and fever reducers.

It is also available in prescription medicines and in medicines that treat multiple naproxen sodium of the common cold or symptoms associated with menstruation. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning that use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) around 20 weeks or later in pregnancy may cause rare but serious kidney problems in an unborn baby.

Click here to learn more. What is naproxen sodium used to treat? Temporarily relieves minor aches and pains due to: • Headache • Toothache • Back pain • Menstrual cramps • The common cold • Muscular aches • Minor arthritis pain Temporarily naproxen sodium fever. Common brands containing naproxen sodium: • Aleve ® • Store Brands (ex. Walmart’s “Equate” store brand or CVS Health store brand) How much naproxen sodium can you take? The U.S.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends adults take no more than 660 milligrams (mg) of naproxen sodium in a 24-hour period. Different types of products containing naproxen sodium have different strengths. That’s why it is always important to read and follow the Drug Facts label. Most medicines warn against use of an active ingredient for longer naproxen sodium 7-10 days.

naproxen sodium

Stop use and ask a doctor if symptoms persist. Safety guide for naproxen sodium Naproxen sodium naproxen sodium approved by FDA and is safe and effective when used according to the Drug Facts label. You should not take more medicine or for a longer period of time than the label says unless instructed by a healthcare provider.

Ask a healthcare provider before use if: • You are currently using another medicine containing an NSAID (e.g., aspirin, magnesium salicylate, naproxen, ibuprofen, or ketoprofen). • You are taking a blood thinner (anticoagulant), steroid, diuretic, or any other drug.

• You are pregnant or breastfeeding. Women in the last three months of pregnancy are specifically told not to use naproxen sodium or any NSAID without a healthcare provider’s permission.

• You are over the age of 60. • You have had stomach ulcers or bleeding problems. • You drink three or naproxen sodium alcoholic drinks every day. • You are under a healthcare provider’s care for any serious condition.

Do not use if: • You are preparing to have heart surgery or if you just had heart surgery. • You have ever had an allergic reaction to any other pain reliever or fever reducer. • You are a woman in the last three months of naproxen sodium unless your healthcare provider specifically tells you to. Problems in the unborn child or complications during delivery could occur. • Tamper-evident packaging features such as seals, locks, and films are not clear or seem broken.

• Do not give an OTC medicine containing naproxen sodium to children under the age of 12 unless advised by a healthcare provider. Stop use and ask a doctor if: • An allergic reaction occurs. Seek medical help right away. • Your fever gets worse or lasts more than three days, or if naproxen sodium pain gets worse and lasts more than 10 days. • You have signs of stomach bleeding, such as you feel faint, vomit blood, have stomach pain or upset that lasts or does not get better, or naproxen sodium bloody or black stools.

• Redness or swelling is present in the painful area or if any new symptoms appear. • You have difficulty swallowing or if it feels like the pill is stuck in your throat. • You develop heartburn. • You take too much. Immediately contact a healthcare provider or the poison control national helpline at 800.222.1222. What are the side effects of naproxen sodium? • Naproxen sodium, like other NSAIDs, may cause a severe allergic reaction, especially in people who are allergic to aspirin.

If you experience serious symptoms such as hives, facial swelling, asthma (wheezing), shock, skin reddening, rash, or blisters, stop using the medicine and seek immediate medical attention. • Severe stomach bleeding may occur. The chance is higher if you are age 60 or older; have had stomach ulcers or bleeding problems; or if you are taking a blood thinner (anticoagulant), steroid drug, or other medicines containing NSAIDs (e.g., aspirin, magnesium salicylate, naproxen sodium, ibuprofen, or ketoprofen).

• Long-term continuous use may increase the risk of heart attack or stroke. • If upset stomach occurs, you may take the medicine with milk or food. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (including naproxen) may rarely increase the risk for a heart attack or stroke. This effect can happen at any time while taking this drug but is more likely if you take it for a long time. The naproxen sodium may be greater in older adults or if you have heart disease or increased risk for heart disease (for example, due to naproxen sodium, family history of heart disease, or conditions such as high blood pressure or diabetes).

Do not take naproxen sodium drug right before or after heart bypass surgery (CABG). This drug may rarely cause serious (rarely fatal) bleeding from the stomach or intestines. This effect can occur without warning at any naproxen sodium while taking this drug. Older adults may be at higher risk for this effect. Stop taking naproxen and get medical help right away if you notice any of these rare but serious side effects: stomach/ abdominal pain that doesn't go away, black/tarry stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, chest/jaw/left arm pain, shortness of breath, unusual sweating, confusion, weakness on one side of the naproxen sodium, trouble speaking, sudden vision changes.

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about the benefits and risks of taking this drug. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (including naproxen) may rarely increase the risk for naproxen sodium heart attack or stroke. This effect can happen at any time while taking this drug but is more likely if you take it for a long time.

The risk may be greater in older adults or if you have heart disease or increased risk for heart disease (for example, due to smoking, family history of heart disease, or conditions such as high blood pressure or diabetes).

Do not take this drug right before or after heart bypass surgery (CABG). This drug may rarely cause serious (rarely fatal) bleeding from the stomach or intestines.

This effect can occur without warning at any time while taking this drug. Older adults may be at higher risk for this effect. Stop taking naproxen and get medical help right away if you notice any of these rare but serious side effects: stomach/ abdominal naproxen sodium that doesn't go naproxen sodium, black/tarry stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, chest/jaw/left arm pain, shortness of breath, unusual sweating, confusion, weakness on one side of the body, trouble speaking, sudden vision changes.

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about the benefits and risks of taking this drug. . Show More See also Warning section. Naproxen is used to relieve pain from various conditions such as headache, muscle aches, tendonitis, dental pain, and menstrual cramps. It also reduces pain, swelling, and joint stiffness caused by arthritis, bursitis, and gout attacks.

This medication is known as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It works by blocking your body's production of certain natural substances that cause inflammation.If you are treating a chronic condition such as arthritis, ask your doctor about non-drug treatments and/or using other medications to treat your pain.Check the ingredients on the label even if you have used the product before. The manufacturer may have changed the ingredients.

Also, products with similar names may contain different ingredients meant for different purposes. Taking the wrong product could harm you. If you are taking the naproxen sodium product, read all directions on the product package before taking this medication. If your doctor has prescribed this medication, read the Medication Guide provided by your pharmacist before you start taking naproxen and each time you get a refill.

Naproxen sodium you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 2 or 3 times a day with a full glass of water (8 ounces/240 milliliters).

Do not lie down for at least 10 minutes after taking this drug. To prevent stomach upset, take this medication with food, milk, or an antacid. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. To reduce your risk of stomach bleeding and other side effects, take this medication at the lowest effective dose for the shortest possible time. Do not increase your dose or take this drug more often than directed by your doctor or the package label.

For ongoing conditions such as arthritis, continue taking this medication as directed by your doctor. For certain conditions (such as arthritis), it may take up to two weeks of taking this drug regularly until you get the full benefit. If you are taking this drug "as needed" (not on a regular schedule), remember that pain medications work best if they are used as naproxen sodium first signs of pain occur. If you wait until the pain has worsened, the medication may not work as well.

If your condition lasts or gets worse, or if you think you may have a serious medical naproxen sodium, get medical help right away. If you are using the nonprescription product to treat fever, consult the doctor right away if the fever worsens or lasts more than 3 days. See also Warning section. Upset stomach, nausea, heartburn, headache, drowsiness, or dizziness may occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

If your doctor has directed you to use this medication, remember that your doctor has judged that the naproxen sodium to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects. This medication may raise your blood pressure. Check your blood pressure regularly and tell your doctor if the results are high. Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, naproxen sodium easy bruising/bleeding, difficult/painful swallowing, hearing changes (such as ringing in the ears), mental/mood changes, signs of kidney problems (such as change in the amount of urine), unexplained stiff neck, vision changes, symptoms of heart failure (such as swelling ankles/feet, unusual tiredness, unusual/ sudden weight gain).

This drug may rarely cause serious (possibly fatal) liver disease. Get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of liver damage, including: nausea/ vomiting that doesn't stop, loss of appetite, stomach/ abdominal pain, yellowing eyes/ skin, dark urine.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: fever, swollen lymph nodes, rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/ tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. In the US - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch. In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345. Before taking naproxen, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to aspirin or other NSAIDs (such as ibuprofen, celecoxib); or if you have any other allergies.

This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: asthma, aspirin-sensitive asthma (a history of worsening breathing with runny/stuffy nose after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs), blood disorders (such as anemia), bleeding/clotting problems, growths in the nose ( nasal polyps), heart disease (such as previous heart attack), high blood pressure, liver disease, stroke, swelling ( edema, fluid retention), stomach/intestinal/ esophagus problems (such as bleeding, heartburn, naproxen sodium.

Kidney problems can sometimes occur with the use of NSAID medications, including naproxen. Problems are more likely to occur if you are dehydrated, have heart failure or kidney disease, are an older adult, or if you take certain medications (see also Drug Interactions section). Drink plenty of fluids as directed by your doctor to prevent dehydration and tell your doctor right away if you have a change in the amount of urine.

This drug may make you dizzy or drowsy. Alcohol or marijuana ( cannabis) can make you more dizzy or drowsy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness until you can do it safely. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis). This naproxen sodium may cause stomach bleeding.

Daily use of alcohol and tobacco, especially when combined with this medicine, may increase your risk for stomach bleeding. Limit alcohol and stop smoking. Ask naproxen sodium doctor or pharmacist about how much alcohol you may safely drink.

This medication may make you more sensitive to the sun. Limit your naproxen sodium in the sun. Avoid tanning booths and sunlamps. Use sunscreen and wear protective clothing when outdoors. Tell your doctor right away if you get sunburned or have skin blisters/redness.

Some naproxen products contain salt (sodium). Tell your doctor if you are on a salt-restricted diet. Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

Older adults may be at greater risk for stomach/intestinal bleeding, kidney problems, heart attack, and stroke while using this drug. Before using this medication, women of childbearing age should talk with their doctor(s) about the benefits and risks. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or if you plan to become pregnant. This medication may harm an unborn baby and cause problems with normal labor/delivery. It is not recommended for use in pregnancy from 20 weeks until delivery.

If your doctor decides that you need to use this medication between 20 and 30 weeks of pregnancy, you should use the lowest effective dose for the shortest possible time.

You should not use this medication after 30 weeks of pregnancy. This drug passes into breast milk and may have undesirable effects on a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects.

This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval. Naproxen sodium products that may interact with this drug are: aliskiren, ACE inhibitors (such as captopril, lisinopril), angiotensin II receptor blockers (such as losartan, valsartan), cidofovir, corticosteroids (such as prednisone), lithium, " water pills" ( diuretics such as furosemide).

This medication may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with other drugs that also may cause bleeding. Examples include anti- platelet drugs such as clopidogrel, " blood thinners" such as dabigatran/ enoxaparin/ warfarin, among others.

Check all prescription and nonprescription medicine labels carefully since many medications contain pain relievers/fever reducers ( aspirin, NSAIDs such as celecoxib, ibuprofen, or ketorolac). These drugs are similar to naproxen and may increase your risk of side effects if taken together.

However, if your doctor has directed you to take low-dose aspirin to prevent heart attack or stroke (usually 81-162 milligrams a day), you should continue taking the aspirin unless your doctor instructs you otherwise.

Daily use of naproxen may decrease aspirin's ability to prevent heart attack/stroke. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits. Ask about other medications that can be used to treat pain/fever. This medication may interfere with certain lab tests, possibly causing false test results. Make sure lab personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug. If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911.

Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.

Symptoms of overdose may include: severe stomach pain, extreme drowsiness, seizures. Do not share this medication with others. Lab and/or medical tests (such as blood pressure, complete blood count, liver/ kidney function) may be done while you are taking this medication. Keep all medical and lab appointments. Consult your doctor for more details. If you have arthritis, lifestyle changes (such as weight loss if needed, strengthening/conditioning exercises) may help improve your flexibility and joint function.

Consult your doctor for specific instructions. Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets. Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed.

Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company. Selected from data included with permission and copyrighted by First Databank, Inc. This copyrighted material has been downloaded from a licensed data provider and is not for distribution, except as may be authorized by the applicable terms of use.

CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

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naproxen sodium

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• AU: S2 (Pharmacy medicine) when in preparations that contain no more than 15 days' supply.

Otherwise it is Schedule 4 (Prescription only). [4] • CA: OTC • UK: P (for menstrual use), otherwise POM • US: OTC / Rx-only Pharmacokinetic data Bioavailability 95% (by mouth) Protein binding 99% Metabolism Liver (to 6-desmethylnaproxen) Elimination half-life 12–17 hours (adults) [5] Excretion Kidney Identifiers Key:CMWTZPSULFXXJA-VIFPVBQESA-N Y (verify) Naproxen, sold under the brand naproxen sodium Aleve or Apronax among others, is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used naproxen sodium treat pain, menstrual cramps, inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout and fever.

[6] It is taken orally. [6] It is available in immediate and delayed release formulations. [6] Onset of effects is within an hour and last for up to twelve hours.

[6] Common side effects include dizziness, headache, bruising, allergic reactions, heartburn, and stomach pain. [6] Severe side effects include an increased risk of heart disease, stroke, gastrointestinal bleeding, and stomach ulcers. [6] The heart disease risk may be lower than with other NSAIDs.

[6] It is not recommended in people with kidney problems. [6] Use is not recommended in the third trimester of pregnancy. [6] Naproxen is a nonselective COX inhibitor. [6] As an NSAID, naproxen appears to exert its anti-inflammatory action by reducing the production of inflammatory mediators called prostaglandins. [7] It is metabolized by the liver to inactive metabolites. [6] Naproxen was patented in 1967, and approved for medical use in the United States in 1976.

[8] naproxen sodium [9] In the United States it is available over the counter and as a generic medication. [6] [10] In 2019, it was the 61st most commonly prescribed medication in the United Naproxen sodium, with more than 11 million prescriptions. [11] [12] Contents • 1 Medical uses • 1.1 Available formulations • 1.2 Pregnancy and lactation • 2 Adverse effects • 2.1 Gastrointestinal • 2.2 Cardiovascular • naproxen sodium Interactions • 3.1 Drug–drug interactions • 4 Pharmacology • 4.1 Mechanism of action • 4.2 Pharmacokinetics • 4.3 Pharmacogenetics • 5 Chemistry • 5.1 Synthesis • 6 Society and culture • 6.1 Brand names • 6.2 Access restrictions • 7 Research • 8 Veterinary use • 8.1 Horses • 9 References • 10 External links Medical uses [ edit ] Naproxen's medical uses are related to its mechanism of action as an anti-inflammatory compound.

[8] Naproxen is used naproxen sodium treat a variety of inflammatory conditions and symptoms that are due to excessive inflammation, such as pain and fever (naproxen has fever-reducing, or antipyretic, properties in addition to its anti-inflammatory activity). [8] Inflammatory sources of pain that may respond to naproxen's anti-inflammatory activity are conditions such as migraine, osteoarthritis, kidney stones, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, gout, ankylosing spondylitis, menstrual cramps, tendinitis, and bursitis.

[1] Naproxen sodium is used as a "bridge therapy" in medication-overuse headache to slowly take patients off other medications.

[13] Available formulations [ edit ] Naproxen sodium is available as both an immediate release and as an extended release tablet. The extended release formulations (sometimes called "sustained release," or "enteric coated") take longer to take effect than the immediate release formulations, and therefore are less useful when immediate pain relief is desired. Extended release formulations are more useful for the treatment of chronic, or long-lasting, conditions, in which long-term pain relief is desirable.

[14] • Naproxen extended release 500 mg, back and front. Pregnancy and lactation [ edit ] Small amounts of naproxen are excreted in breast milk. [1] However, adverse effects are uncommon in infants breastfed from a mother taking naproxen.

[15] Adverse effects [ edit ] Common adverse effects include dizziness, drowsiness, headache, rash, bruising, and gastrointestinal upset. [8] [1] Heavy use is associated with increased risk of end-stage renal disease and kidney failure. [8] [16] Naproxen may cause muscle cramps in the legs in 3% of people. [17] In October 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required the drug label to be updated for all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications to describe the risk of kidney problems in unborn babies that result in low amniotic fluid.

[18] [19] They recommend avoiding NSAIDs in pregnant women at 20 weeks or later in pregnancy. [18] [19] Gastrointestinal [ edit ] As with other non-COX-2 selective NSAIDs, naproxen can cause gastrointestinal problems, such as heartburn, constipation, diarrhea, ulcers and stomach bleeding.

[20] Naproxen should be taken orally with food to decrease the risk of gastrointestinal side effects. [ citation needed] Persons with a history of ulcers or inflammatory bowel disease should consult a doctor before taking naproxen.

[ citation needed] In U.S. markets, naproxen is sold with boxed warnings about the risk of gastrointestinal ulceration or bleeding. [1] Naproxen poses an intermediate risk of stomach ulcers compared with ibuprofen, which is low-risk, and indometacin, which is high-risk. [21] To reduce stomach ulceration risk, it is often combined naproxen sodium a naproxen sodium inhibitor (a medication that reduces stomach acid production) during long-term treatment of those with pre-existing stomach ulcers or a history of developing stomach ulcers while on NSAIDs.

[22] [23] Cardiovascular [ edit ] COX-2 selective and nonselective NSAIDs have been linked to increases in the number of serious and potentially fatal cardiovascular events, such as myocardial infarctions and strokes.

[24] Naproxen is, however, associated with the smallest overall cardiovascular risks. [25] [26] Cardiovascular risk must be considered when prescribing any nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. The drug had roughly 50% of the associated risk of stroke compared with ibuprofen, and was also associated with a reduced number of myocardial infarctions compared with control groups.

[25] A study found that high-dose naproxen induced near-complete suppression of platelet thromboxane throughout the dosing interval and appeared not to increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, naproxen sodium other non-aspirin high-dose NSAID regimens had only transient effects on platelet COX-1 and were associated with a small but definite vascular hazard. Conversely, naproxen was associated with higher rates of upper gastrointestinal bleeding complications compared with other NSAIDs.

[26] Interactions [ edit ] Drug–drug interactions [ edit ] Naproxen may interact with antidepressants, lithium, methotrexate, probenecid, warfarin and other blood thinners, heart or blood pressure medications, including diuretics, or steroid medicines such as prednisone.

[1] NSAIDs naproxen sodium as naproxen may interfere with and reduce the efficacy of SSRI antidepressants, naproxen sodium as well as increase the risk of bleeding greater than the individual bleeding risk of either class of agent, when taken together. [28] Naproxen is not contraindicated in the presence of SSRIs, though concomitant use of the medications should be done with caution.

[28] Alcohol consumption increases the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding when combined with NSAIDs like naproxen in a dose-dependent manner (that is, naproxen sodium higher the dose of naproxen, the higher the risk of bleeding).

[29] The risk is highest for people who are heavy drinkers. [29] Pharmacology [ edit ] Mechanism of action [ edit ] Naproxen works by reversibly inhibiting both the COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes as a non-selective coxib. [30] [31] [32] [33] [34] This results in the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Prostaglandins act as signaling molecules in the body, inducing inflammation.

Thus, by inhibiting COX-1/2, naproxen induces an anti-inflammatory effect. Pharmacokinetics [ edit ] Naproxen is a minor substrate of CYP1A2 and CYP2C9. It is extensively metabolized naproxen sodium the liver to 6-O-desmethylnaproxen, and both the parent drug and the desmethyl metabolite undergo further metabolism to their respective acylglucuronide conjugated metabolites.

[35] An analysis of two clinical trials shows that naproxen's time to peak plasma concentration occurs between 2–4 hours after oral administration, though naproxen sodium reaches peak plasma concentrations within 1–2 hours. [5] [ clarification needed] Pharmacogenetics [ edit ] The pharmacogenetics of naproxen has been studied in an effort to better understand its adverse effects.

[36] In 1998, a small pharmacokinetic (PK) study failed to show that differences in a patient's ability to clear naproxen from the body could account for differences in a patient's risk of experiencing the adverse effect of a serious gastrointestinal bleed while taking naproxen. [36] However, the study failed to account for differences in the activity of CYP2C9, a drug-metabolizing enzyme that is necessary for clearing naproxen.

[36] Studies on the relationship between CYP2C9 genotype and NSAID-induced gastrointestinal bleeds have shown that genetic variants in CYP2C9 that reduce the clearance of major CYP2C9 substrates (like naproxen) increase the risk of NSAID-induced gastrointestinal bleeds, especially for homozygous defective variants.

[36] As of October 2017 [update], there were no recommendations for routine CYP2C9 testing for naproxen. [37] [ clarification needed] Chemistry [ edit ] Naproxen is a member of the 2-arylpropionic acid (profen) family of NSAIDs.

[38] The free acid is an odorless, white to off-white crystalline substance. [ citation needed] It is lipid-soluble and practically insoluble in water. It has a melting point of 152–155 °C. [ citation needed] Synthesis [ edit ] Naproxen has been industrially produced by Syntex starting from 2-naphthol as follows: [39] Society and culture [ edit ] Brand names [ edit ] Naproxen and naproxen sodium are marketed under various brand names, including Accord, Aleve, Anaprox, Antalgin, Apranax, Feminax Ultra, Flanax, Inza, Maxidol, Nalgesin, Naposin, Naprelan, Naprogesic, Naprosyn, Narocin, Pronaxen, Proxen, and Soproxen.

[2] It is also available as the combination naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium in delayed release tablets under the brand name Vimovo. [2] [40] Access restrictions [ edit ] Syntex first marketed naproxen in 1976, as the prescription drug Naprosyn.

They first marketed naproxen sodium under the brand name Anaprox in 1980. It remains a prescription-only drug in much of the world. [ citation needed] In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved it as an over-the-counter (OTC) drug in 1994.

OTC preparations of naproxen in the U.S. are mainly marketed by Bayer HealthCare under the brand name Aleve and generic store brand formulations in 220 mg tablets. [41] In Australia, packets of 275 mg tablets of naproxen sodium are Schedule 2 pharmacy medicines, with a maximum daily dose of five tablets or 1375 mg. In the United Kingdom, 250 mg tablets of naproxen were approved for OTC sale under the brand name Feminax Ultra in 2008, for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea in women aged 15 to 50.

[42] In the Netherlands, 220 mg and 275 mg tablets are available OTC in drugstores, 550 mg is OTC only at pharmacies. Aleve became available over the counter in some provinces in Canada [43] on 14 July 2009, but not British Columbia, Quebec or Newfoundland and Labrador; [44] it subsequently became available OTC in British Columbia in January 2010.

naproxen sodium

{INSERTKEYS} [45] Research [ edit ] Naproxen may have antiviral activity against influenza. In laboratory research, it blocks the RNA-binding groove of the nucleoprotein of the virus, preventing formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex—thus taking the viral nucleoproteins out of circulation. [46] Veterinary use [ edit ] Horses [ edit ] Naproxen is given by mouth to horses at a dose of 10 mg/kg, and has shown to have a wide safety margin (no toxicity when given at three times the recommended dose for 42 days).

[47] It is more effective for myositis than the commonly used NSAID phenylbutazone, and has shown especially good results for treatment of equine exertional rhabdomyolysis, [48] a disease of muscle breakdown; it is less commonly used for musculoskeletal disease. [ medical citation needed] References [ edit ] • ^ a b c d e f "Naproxen". Drugs.com. 2017 . Retrieved 7 February 2017.

• ^ a b c "Naproxen international". Drugs.com. 7 December 2020 . Retrieved 3 January 2021. • ^ "Naproxen Use During Pregnancy". Drugs.com. 13 August 2019 . Retrieved 27 December 2019. • ^ Gill, A, ed. (July 2013). Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Medicines and Poisons No. 4 (PDF). The Poisons Standard 2013. Therapeutic Goods Administration. ISBN 978-1-74241-895-7. • ^ a b Angiolillo DJ, Weisman SM (April 2017). "Clinical Pharmacology and Cardiovascular Safety of Naproxen".

American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs. 17 (2): 97–107. doi: 10.1007/s40256-016-0200-5. PMC 5340840. PMID 27826802. • ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Naproxen Monograph for Professionals". Drugs.com. AHFS . Retrieved 19 December 2018. • ^ McEvoy GK (2000). AHFS Drug Information, 2000. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists.

p. 1854. ISBN 9781585280049. • ^ a b c d e "Naprosyn- naproxen tablet EC-Naprosyn- naproxen tablet, delayed release Anaprox DS- naproxen sodium tablet". DailyMed. 1 July 2019 . Retrieved 27 December 2019. • ^ Fischer J, Ganellin CR (2006). Analogue-based Drug Discovery. John Wiley & Sons.

p. 520. ISBN 9783527607495. • ^ "Medicines A to Z - Naproxen". NHS. National Health Service. 24 October 2018 . Retrieved 11 March 2020.

• ^ "The Top 300 of 2019". ClinCalc . Retrieved 16 October 2021. • ^ "Naproxen - Drug Usage Statistics". ClinCalc . Retrieved 16 October 2021. • ^ Garza I, Schwedt TJ (2010). "Diagnosis and Management of Chronic Daily Headache". Seminars in Neurology. WebMD LLC. 30 (2): 154–66. doi: 10.1055/s-0030-1249224. PMID 20352585 . Retrieved 17 May 2017. • ^ a b "L490 (Naproxen 220 mg)". drugs.com. Drugs.com . Retrieved 17 May 2017. • ^ "LACTMED: NAPROXEN". TOXNET. {/INSERTKEYS}

naproxen sodium

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naproxen sodium

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naproxen sodium

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285 (45): 34950–9. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M110.162982. PMC 2966109. PMID 20810665. • ^ Hinz B, Cheremina O, Besz D, Zlotnick S, Brune K (April 2008). "Impact of naproxen naproxen sodium at over-the-counter doses on cyclooxygenase isoforms in naproxen sodium volunteers". International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 46 (4): 180–6. doi: 10.5414/CPP46180. PMID 18397691. • ^ Van Hecken A, Schwartz JI, Depré M, De Lepeleire I, Dallob A, Tanaka W, et al. (October 2000). "Comparative inhibitory activity of rofecoxib, meloxicam, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and naproxen on COX-2 versus COX-1 in healthy volunteers".

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Naproxen, ibuprofen, and benoxaprofen". Drug Metabolism and Disposition. 15 (6): 767–72. PMID 2893700. • ^ Harrington PJ, Lodewijk E (1997). "Twenty Years of Naproxen Technology". Org. Process Res. Dev. 1 (1): 72–76. doi: 10.1021/op960009e. • ^ "Vimovo- naproxen and esomeprazole magnesium tablet, delayed release". DailyMed. 2 August 2019. Retrieved 27 December 2019.

• ^ "Aleve- naproxen sodium tablet". DailyMed. 4 November 2019. Retrieved 27 December 2019. • ^ "Medicines regulator approves availability of a new OTC medicine for period pain" (Press release). Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). 1 April 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 September 2013.

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"Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs". Naproxen sodium of the Annual Convention of the American Association of Equine Practitioners. 47: 182–187. ISSN 0065-7182. • ^ Naproxen sodium SA, Lees P (1996). "Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs". In McIlwraith CW, Trotter GW (eds.). Joint disease in the horse. Philadelphia: WB Saunders.

pp. 223–237. ISBN 0-7216-5135-6. External links [ edit ] Naproxen sodium up naproxen in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. • "Naproxen". Drug Information Portal. U.S. National Library of Medicine. • "Naproxen sodium". Drug Information Portal. 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By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization. • Privacy policy • About Wikipedia • Disclaimers • Contact Wikipedia • Mobile view • Developers • Statistics • Cookie statement • • Naproxen Generic name: naproxen [ na-PROX-en ] Brand names: Aleve, EC-Naprosyn, Flanax Pain Reliever, Midol Extended Relief, Naprelan.

. show all 12 brands Naprosyn, Anaprox, Anaprox-DS, Naproxen Sodium, Aleve Caplet, Aleve Gelcap, Aleve Easy Open Arthritis Drug class: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Medically reviewed by Kaci Durbin, MD. Last updated on Apr 12, 2022. • Uses • Warnings • Before taking • Side effects • Interactions • Dosage • FAQ What is naproxen? Naproxen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Naproxen is used to treat pain or inflammation caused by conditions such as arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, tendinitis, bursitis, gout, or menstrual cramps. It can also be used to treat acute pain caused by other conditions not listed in this medication guide. The delayed-release or extended-release tablets are slower-acting forms of naproxen that are used only for treating chronic conditions such as arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis.

These forms will not work fast enough to treat acute pain. Naproxen is also available in combination with other medications under the following brand names: Aleve PM, Aleve-D Sinus and Cold, Treximet, and Vimovo Warnings You should not use naproxen if you have a history of allergic reaction to aspirin or other NSAID (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug). Naproxen can increase your risk of fatal heart attack or stroke, especially if you use it long term or take high doses, or if you have heart disease.

Even people without heart disease or risk factors could have a stroke or heart attack while taking this medicine. Do not use this medicine just before or after heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Get emergency medical help if you have swelling of the face or throat, chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred speech, or problems with vision or balance. Stop taking naproxen and notify your physician if you notice stomach pain, tiredness or weakness, yellow skin or eyes, nausea, vomiting, bloody or black and sticky bowel movements, skin rash, unexplained weight loss or weight gain, or swelling of the hands and feet.

Naproxen may also cause stomach or intestinal bleeding, which can be fatal. These conditions can occur without warning while you are using this medicine, especially in older adults. Before taking this medicine Naproxen may also cause stomach or intestinal bleeding, which can be fatal. These conditions can occur without warning while you are using this medicine, especially in older adults.

You should not use naproxen if you are allergic to it, or if you have ever had an asthma attack or severe allergic reaction naproxen sodium taking aspirin or an NSAID. Ask a doctor before giving naproxen to a child younger than 12 years old. Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to use this medicine if you have: • heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or if you smoke; • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot; • a history of stomach ulcers or bleeding; • asthma; • liver or kidney disease; • fluid retention: or • if you take aspirin to prevent heart attack or stroke.

If you are pregnant, you should not take naproxen unless your doctor tells you to. Taking a NSAID during the last 20 weeks of pregnancy can cause serious heart or kidney problems in the unborn baby and possible complications with your pregnancy. It may not be safe to breastfeed while using naproxen. Ask your doctor about any risk. Naproxen is not approved for use by anyone younger than 2 years old. Do not give this medicine to a child without medical advice.

How should I take naproxen? Use naproxen exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take this medicine naproxen sodium larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Use the lowest dose that is effective in treating your condition. Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. Measure liquid medicine with the dosing syringe provided, or with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup.

If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one. If you change brands, strengths, or forms of this medicine, your dosage needs may change. Ask your pharmacist if you have any questions about the kind of naproxen you are using. If a child is using this medicine, tell your doctor if the child has any changes in weight. Doses are based on weight in children, and any changes may affect your child's dose.

If you use this medicine long-term, you may need frequent medical tests. This medicine can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using naproxen.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use. Read all patient information, medication guides, and instruction sheets provided to you. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. Detailed Naproxen dosage information What happens if I miss a dose? Since naproxen is sometimes used only when needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are naproxen sodium a schedule, use the missed dose as soon as you remember.

Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What to avoid Naproxen sodium drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of stomach bleeding.

Avoid taking aspirin unless your doctor tells you to. Ask your doctor before taking any other medication for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. Many medicines available over the counter contain aspirin, salicylates, or other medicines similar to naproxen (such as ibuprofen or ketoprofen).

Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much of this type of medication. Ask your doctor before using an antacid, and use only the type your doctor recommends. Some antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb naproxen.

Naproxen side effects Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to naproxen: wheezing or trouble breathing; hives; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Get emergency medical help if you have signs of a heart attack or stroke: chest pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder, sudden naproxen sodium or weakness on one side of the body, slurred speech, feeling short of breath.

Stop using naproxen and call your doctor at once if you have: • shortness of breath (even with mild exertion); • swelling or rapid weight gain; • the first sign of any skin rash, no matter how mild; • signs of stomach bleeding - bloody or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds; • liver problems - nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, tired feeling, flu-like symptoms, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or naproxen sodium • kidney problems - little or no urinating, painful or difficult urination, swelling in your feet or ankles, feeling tired or naproxen sodium of breath; • low red blood cells (anemia) - pale skin, feeling light-headed or short of breath, rapid heart rate, trouble concentrating; or • severe skin reaction - fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Common naproxen side effects may include: • indigestion, naproxen sodium, stomach pain, nausea; • headache, dizziness, drowsiness; • bruising, itching, rash; • swelling; or • ringing in your ears. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about naproxen sodium effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Naproxen side effects (more detail) What other drugs will affect naproxen? Ask your doctor before using naproxen if you take an antidepressant such as citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline (Zoloft), trazodone, or vilazodone.

Taking any of these medicines with an NSAID may cause you to bruise or bleed easily. Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to use this medicine if you are also using any of the following drugs: • cholestyramine; • cyclosporine; • digoxin; • lithium; • methotrexate; • pemetrexed; • phenytoin or similar seizure medications; • naproxen sodium • warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) or similar blood thinners; • a diuretic or "water pill"; • heart or blood pressure medication; or • insulin or oral diabetes medicine.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with naproxen, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide. It should be out of your system within approx 93.5 hours. Naproxen has an elimination half life of 12 to 17 hours.

This is the time it takes for your body to reduce plasma drug levels by half. It takes approximately 5.5 x elimination half-life for a drug to be eliminated from your system. Continue reading In the U.S. Apronax is called naproxen sodium (brand example: Aleve). Naproxen is a common NSAID medicine used to treat pain, fever, and headache.

Apronax appears to be a name for naproxen sodium in countries such as Columbia and Ecuador. Continue reading More FAQ • Which painkiller should you use? • What is the best way to reduce swelling in your face? • Can NSAIDs be used to treat a COVID-19 fever? View more FAQ More about naproxen • Side effects • Drug interactions • Dosage information • During pregnancy or Breastfeeding • Reviews (641) • Patient tips • Drug images • Compare alternatives • Pricing & coupons • Drug class: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Patient resources • Advanced Reading • Naproxen Modified-Release Tablets • Naproxen Tablets and Capsules • Naproxen Suspension Other brands Aleve, Naprosyn, Anaprox, Anaprox-DS.

. +4 more Professional resources • Prescribing Information Related treatment guides • Back Pain • Ankylosing Spondylitis • Bursitis • Aseptic Necrosis Further information Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medicine only naproxen sodium the indication prescribed. Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Medical Disclaimer Copyright 1996-2022 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 18.01. Drugs.com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products.

This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Data sources include IBM Watson Micromedex (updated 3 May 2022), Cerner Multum™ (updated 28 Apr 2022), ASHP (updated 11 Apr 2022) and others.
Highlights for naproxen • Prescription naproxen oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug.

Brand name: Anaprox DS, Naprelan, and Naprosyn. • Naproxen sodium are two types of prescription naproxen: regular naproxen and naproxen sodium. Regular naproxen comes as an oral immediate-release tablet, an oral delayed-release tablet, and an oral suspension. Naproxen sodium comes as an oral immediate-release tablet and an oral extended-release tablet. Naproxen is also available in over-the-counter forms.

naproxen sodium

• All forms of prescription naproxen oral tablets help reduce swelling and pain. They’re used to treat many conditions, including arthritis, menstrual pain, muscle and joint inflammation, and gout. What is naproxen? There are two types of prescription naproxen: regular naproxen and naproxen sodium.

Regular naproxen comes as an oral immediate-release tablet, an oral delayed-release tablet, and an oral suspension. Naproxen sodium comes as an oral immediate-release tablet and an oral extended-release tablet.

naproxen sodium

Naproxen is also available in over-the-counter forms. This article only addresses prescription forms of naproxen. Prescription naproxen sodium oral tablets are available as the brand-name drugs Anaprox DS, Naprelan, and Naprosyn. They’re also available as generic drugs. Generic drugs usually cost less than the brand-name version. In some cases, they may not be available in all strengths or forms as the brand-name drug. Why it’s used Prescription naproxen oral tablets naproxen sodium used to treat pain and inflammation in a variety of conditions.

It’s approved to treat: • rheumatoid arthritis • osteoarthritis • ankylosing spondylitis • juvenile arthritis • menstrual period pain • tendonitis • bursitis • symptoms of gout How it works Prescription naproxen oral tablets belong to a class of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs help reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. It isn’t fully understood how this medication works to decrease pain. It may help reduce swelling by lowering levels of prostaglandin.

This is a hormone-like substance that usually causes inflammation. Naproxen side effects Prescription naproxen oral tablets may cause drowsiness. You shouldn’t drive, use machinery, or do other activities that require naproxen sodium until you know you can function normally. This drug can also cause other side effects.

More common side effects The more common side effects that occur with naproxen oral tablet include: • stomach pain • constipation • diarrhea • gas • heartburn • nausea and vomiting • dizziness Mild side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if they’re more severe or don’t go away. Serious side effects Call your naproxen sodium right away if you have serious side effects.

Call 911 if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency. Serious side effects and their symptoms can include the following: • chest pain • shortness of breath or trouble breathing • weakness in one part or side of your body • difficulty speaking • swelling of the face or throat • high naproxen sodium pressure • bleeding and ulcers in your stomach and intestines, with symptoms such as: • stomach pain • bloody vomit • blood in your stool • black and sticky stool • asthma attacks in people who have asthma • low red blood cell count, which can cause fatigue, lethargy, and weakness • yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes • unusual weight gain or swelling of your arms, legs, hands, and feet • skin rash or blisters with fever Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information.

However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible side effects. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always discuss possible side effects with a healthcare professional who knows your medical history.

Naproxen may interact with other medications Prescription naproxen oral tablets can interact with other medications, vitamins, or herbs you may be taking. An interaction is when a substance changes the way a drug works.

This can be harmful or prevent the drug from working well. To help avoid interactions, your doctor should manage all of your medications carefully. Naproxen sodium sure to tell your doctor about all medications, vitamins, or herbs you’re taking. To find out how this drug might interact with something else you’re taking, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Examples of drugs that can cause interactions with naproxen are listed below. Antidepressant drugs Combining selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) with naproxen increases your risk of stomach and intestinal bleeding. Examples of these drugs include: • citalopram • fluoxetine • fluvoxamine • paroxetine Blood pressure drugs Naproxen might make your blood pressure medications not work as well. If you’re older than 65 years, combining naproxen with certain blood pressure medications may damage your kidneys.

Examples of these medications include: • angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors • angiotensin receptor blockers • beta-blockers, such as propranolol • diuretics Heartburn drugs and drugs that protect the stomach Taking any of these medications with naproxen may make naproxen treat your pain more slowly: • aluminum hydroxide • magnesium oxide • sucralfate Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) Combining naproxen with other NSAIDs increases your risk of stomach and intestinal bleeding.

Examples of these medications include: • aspirin • ibuprofen • etodolac • diclofenac • flurbiprofen • ketoprofen • ketorolac Cholestyramine If you take cholestyramine with naproxen, your body may absorb naproxen more slowly than usual. That means it may take longer to work. Lithium If you take naproxen with lithium, it may increase the lithium in your body to harmful levels. Methotrexate Taking methotrexate with naproxen can lead to harmful levels of methotrexate in your body. Warfarin Taking warfarin with naproxen increases your risk of stomach and intestinal bleeding.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, naproxen sodium drugs interact differently in each person, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible interactions.

This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your healthcare professional about possible interactions with all prescription drugs, vitamins, herbs and supplements, and over-the-counter drugs that you are taking. How to take naproxen All possible dosages and forms may not be included here. Your dose, form, and how often you take it will depend on: • your age • the condition being treated • how severe your condition is • other medical conditions you have • how you react to the first dose Dosage forms and strengths Generic: Naproxen • Form: immediate-release oral tablet • Strengths: 250 mg, 375 mg, 500 naproxen sodium • Form: delayed-release oral tablet • Strengths: 375 mg500 mg Generic: Naproxen sodium • Form: immediate-release oral tablet • Strengths: 220mg, 275 mg, 550 mg • Form: extended-release oral tablet • Strengths: 375 mg, 500 mg, 750 mg Brand: Naprosyn (naproxen) • Form: immediate-release oral tablet • Strengths: 500 mg • Form: delayed-release oral tablet • Strengths: 375 mg, 500 mg Brand: Naprelan (naproxen sodium) • Form: extended-release oral tablet • Strengths: 375 mg, 500 mg, 750 mg Dosage for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older) Naproxen: Immediate-release oral tablet • The typical dosage is 500 to 1,000 mg daily in two divided doses.

• The maximum dose is 1,500 mg per day. This should be given for a limited time period (up to 6 months). Delayed-release oral tablet • The typical dosage 375 to 500 mg twice daily. • The maximum dose is 1,500 mg per day. This should be given for a limited time period (up to 6 months).

Naproxen sodium: Immediate-release oral tablet • The typical dosage is 275 to 550 mg twice daily. • The maximum dose is 1,650 mg per day. This should be given for a limited time period (up to 6 months). Extended-release oral tablet • The typical dosage is 750 or 1,000 mg once daily. • The maximum dose is 1,500 mg per day.

naproxen sodium

This should be given for a limited time period. Child dosage (ages 0–17 years) A dosage for people younger than 18 years hasn’t been naproxen sodium. Special dosage considerations If you’re older than 65 years, your body may process this drug more slowly.

Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose so that too much of this drug doesn’t build up in your body. Too much of the drug in your body can be dangerous. Dosage for juvenile arthritis Child dosage (ages 2–17 years) Children in this age group generally receive the oral suspension form of this drug. The dosage will be naproxen sodium on your child’s weight.

It should be given twice per day in evenly spaced doses. Child dosage (ages 0–23 months) Dosage for children younger than 2 years hasn’t been established. Dosage for tendonitis, bursitis, and menstrual pain Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older) Naproxen: Immediate-release oral tablet • The initial dose is 500 mg, followed by 250 mg every 6 to 8 hours as needed.

• The maximum daily dose on day 1 of therapy is 1,250 mg. Additional daily doses should not exceed 1,000 mg. Delayed-release oral tablet • The initial dose is 1,000 mg once daily. • The dose may be temporarily increased to 1,500 mg once daily if greater pain relief is needed.

Naproxen sodium: Immediate-release oral tablet • The initial dose is 550 mg, followed by 275 mg every 6 to 8 hours or 550 mg every 12 hours as needed. • The maximum daily dose on day 1 of therapy is 1,375 mg. Additional daily doses should not exceed 1,100 mg. Child dosage (ages 0–17 years) Dosage for people younger than 18 years hasn’t been established. Special dosage considerations If you’re older than 65 years, your body may process this drug more slowly. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose so that too much of this drug doesn’t build up in your body.

Too much of the drug in your body can be dangerous. Dosage for gout pain and inflammation Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older) Naproxen: Immediate-release oral tablet • The initial dose is 750 mg, followed by 250 mg every 8 hours until the attack subsides. Delayed-release oral tablet • The initial dose is 1,000 to 1,500 mg once daily followed by 1,000 mg once daily until the attack subsides.

Naproxen sodium: Immediate-release oral tablet • The initial dose is 825 mg, followed by 275 mg every 8 hours until the attack subsides. Child dosage (ages 0–17 years) Dosage naproxen sodium people younger than 18 years hasn’t been established. Special dosage considerations If you’re older than 65 years, your body may process this drug more slowly. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose so that too much of this drug doesn’t build up in your body. Too much of the drug in your naproxen sodium can be dangerous.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this list includes all possible dosages. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your doctor or pharmacist about dosages that are right for you. • This drug has black box warnings. These are the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

• Naproxen may increase the risk of heart disease. Using naproxen in the long term or at high doses increases your risk. People with heart disease or risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure, also have higher risk. Naproxen shouldn’t be used for pain before or after heart bypass surgery. Doing so may increase your risk of a heart attack and stroke.

• Naproxen may cause ulcers and bleeding in your stomach and intestines. This can happen at any time during treatment and may occur without symptoms. This effect can result in death. You’re at higher risk if you’re older than 65 years. High blood pressure warning Naproxen can cause high blood pressure naproxen sodium make your high blood pressure worse.

It can also make your high blood pressure medications not work as well. You may need to watch your blood pressure level carefully while taking naproxen. Water retention and swelling warning Some formulations of this medication have extra salt in them.

Talk with your doctor about which formulation to take if you’re watching your salt intake. Asthma warning Naproxen can cause an asthma attack. If you have asthma that can be triggered by aspirin or other NSAIDs, don’t use naproxen. Allergic reaction warning Naproxen can cause a severe allergic reaction.

Symptoms may include: • trouble breathing • swelling of your throat or tongue • hives If you naproxen sodium an allergic reaction, call your doctor or local poison control center right away.

If your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room. Don’t take this drug again if you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to it.

Taking it again could be fatal (cause death). Alcohol interaction warning Combining naproxen and alcohol increases your risk of ulcer and stomach bleeding. Severe allergic reaction warning This is reaction is called DRESS, which stands for “drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms.” It can occur 2–6 weeks after starting this drug and may be fatal (cause death). Naproxen sodium can include: • skin rash naproxen sodium fever • swollen lymph glands • organ damage, including liver failure Serious skin reactions warning Naproxen may cause life threatening allergic reactions.

These naproxen sodium called Stevens-Johnson syndrome, or SJS, and naproxen sodium epidermal necrolysis, or TEN. Either can cause severe damage to your skin or internal organs and can lead to death. Call your doctor right away if you have any of these symptoms while taking this drug: • skin rash • hives • sores in your mouth • blistering or peeling of your skin Harm to unborn baby Naproxen can cause harm to an unborn baby if taken at 20 weeks or later in pregnancy.

Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Warnings for naproxen sodium groups For people with stomach problems: If you have a history of ulcers or stomach or intestinal bleeding, naproxen increases your risk of stomach or intestinal bleeding. For people with kidney disease: Naproxen can cause kidney damage when it’s used for a long time. Naproxen sodium you have serious kidney disease, you should not use this drug.

For pregnant women: Naproxen sodium is a pregnancy category C drug. That means two things: • Research in animals has shown adverse effects to the fetus when the mother takes the drug. • There haven’t been enough studies done in humans to be certain how the drug might affect the fetus.

Avoid naproxen during the third trimester of pregnancy. It could harm your pregnancy. Talk with your doctor if you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Naproxen sodium women who are breastfeeding: Naproxen is passed through breast milk and could cause side effects in a child who is breastfed.

Breastfeeding is not recommended while taking this medication. For seniors: Use caution when taking naproxen if you’re older than 65 years.

Your body may process this drug more slowly. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose so that this drug doesn’t build up too much in your body. Too much of the drug in your body can be naproxen sodium. For children: The safety and effectiveness of naproxen haven’t been established in children who are younger than 2 years. Take as directed Prescription naproxen oral tablet is a short-term drug treatment.

It comes with risks if you don’t take it as prescribed. If you stop taking the drug suddenly or don’t take it at all: You may experience more pain and inflammation caused by your condition. If you miss doses or don’t take the drug on schedule: Your medication may not work as well or may stop working completely. For this drug to work well, a certain amount needs to be in your body at all times.

If you naproxen sodium too much: You could have dangerous levels of the drug in your body. Symptoms of an overdose of this drug can include: • fatigue • drowsiness • upset stomach • heartburn • nausea and vomiting • loss of consciousness • stomach bleeding In rare cases, an overdose can cause: • dangerous allergic reactions • high blood pressure • kidney failure • trouble breathing • coma If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor or local poison control center.

If your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away. What to do if you miss a dose: If you miss your dose, take it as soon as you can. However, if it’s just a few hours until your next dose, wait until the scheduled time and take a single dose.

Never try to catch up by taking two doses at once. This could result in toxic side effects. How to tell if the drug is working: Signs that the drug is working will depend on the condition being treated. • Adult arthritis: Your pain and swelling may get better, you may be able to walk faster, and your morning stiffness may get better. • Juvenile arthritis: Your pain and swelling may get better and you may be able to walk faster.

• Menstrual pain: Your pain may get better. • Tendonitis or bursitis: Your pain, redness, swelling, and inflammation may get better. • Gout: Your pain and inflammation may get better and the temperature of your skin may start to return to normal. Important considerations for taking naproxen General • You can take naproxen with or without food. Taking it with food may reduce your risk of upset stomach. • You can cut or crush the immediate-release tablet to make it easier to take.

However, don’t cut or break the delayed-release or extended-release forms. Breaking them apart can increase your risk of stomach damage. • You may need to space your doses evenly. If you take a regularly scheduled dose, you may space the doses every 12 hours or every 6–8 hours. Storage • Store naproxen at room temperature between 68°F and 77°F (20°C and 25°C). • Keep the container tightly closed and protect the drug from light. Refills A prescription for this medication is refillable.

You should not need a new prescription for this medication to be refilled. Your naproxen sodium will write the number of refills authorized on your prescription. Travel When traveling with your medication: • Always carry your medication with you. When flying, never put it into a checked bag. Keep it in your carry-on bag.

• Don’t worry about airport X-ray machines. They won’t damage your medication. • You may need to show airport staff the pharmacy label for your medication. Always carry the original prescription-labeled container with you. • Don’t put this medication in your car’s glove compartment or leave it in the car. Be sure to avoid doing this when the weather is very hot or very cold. Clinical monitoring Your doctor will request tests to check your health and make sure this drug is working for you.

These tests may include: • blood test • kidney function test • liver function test • stool sample test Are there any alternatives?

There are other drugs available to treat your condition. Some may be more suitable for you than others. Talk with your doctor about possible alternatives. Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date.

However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects.

The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.

Last medically reviewed on July 23, 2021
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What is Naproxen?




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