Parts of the body with l

parts of the body with l

Medical Terminology for Regions of the Body - dummies {"appState":{"pageLoadApiCallsStatus":true},"articleState":{"article":{"headers":{"creationTime":"2016-03-26T08:11:06+00:00","modifiedTime":"2020-01-03T20:17:39+00:00","timestamp":"2022-02-24T17:05:38+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Body, Mind, & Spirit","_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/categories/34038"},"slug":"body-mind-spirit","categoryId":34038},{"name":"Medical","_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/categories/34077"},"slug":"medical","categoryId":34077},{"name":"Terminology","_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/categories/34086"},"slug":"terminology","categoryId":34086}],"title":"Medical Terminology for Regions of the Body","strippedTitle":"medical terminology for regions of the body","slug":"medical-terminology-for-regions-of-the-body","canonicalUrl":"","seo":{"metaDescription":"Learn the right medical terminology for regions of the body and the directional terms for the body’s anatomical positions and regions, planes, and cavities.","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"Body parts and their accompanying medical terms don’t make a whole lot of sense until you can put them in the context of their general location within the body.

Your body can be defined in several different ways, from groups and regions to cavities and planes.\r\n\r\nBody regions are used to specifically identify a body area. To illustrate all that’s involved with a body region, take a closer look at two major regions: the abdominal and spinal.\r\n\r\nThe abdominal area is divided further into anatomic regions to diagnose abdominal problems with greater accuracy.\r\n\r\nStarting with the diaphragm, which is the muscle separating the thoracic cavity from the parts of the body with l cavity, down to the level of the pelvis or groin, the abdominal area is divided into nine equal regions.\r\n\r\nVisualize the abdomen divided into nine squares: three across the top, three across the middle, and three across the bottom, like a tic-tac-toe board.

The center portion is the umbilical region, the region of the navel or the umbilicus. Directly above this is the epigastric region, or the region of the stomach. Directly below the umbilical region is the hypogastric region.\r\n\r\nOn either side of the epigastric region are the right and left hypochondriac regions.

To the right and left of the umbilical region are the right and left lumbar regions. To the right and left of the hypogastric region are the right and left iliac regions.\r\n

The anatomical divisions of the abdomen are referenced in anatomy textbooks to specify where certain organs are found.

\r\nThe clinical regions of the abdomen are used to describe the abdomen when a patient is being examined.

The clinical regions of the abdomen divide the abdominal area, as above, into four equal quadrants:\r\n

    \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The right upper quadrant (RUQ) contains the right lobe of the liver, gallbladder, and parts of the small and large intestines.

    \r\n
  • \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The left upper quadrant (LUQ) contains the left lobe of the liver, stomach, pancreas, spleen, and parts of the small and large intestines.

    \r\n
  • \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The right lower quadrant (RLQ) contains parts of the small and large intestines, appendix, right ureter, right ovary, and fallopian tube.

    \r\n
  • \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The left lower quadrant (LLQ) contains parts of the small and large intestines, left ureter, left ovary, and fallopian tube.

    \r\n
  • \r\n
\r\nHere’s a quick look at some of the smaller body regions, beginning at the head and moving downward.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n
RegionWhere It Is
Auricular regionAround the ears
AxillaryAxillae (armpits)
BuccalCheeks of the face
CarpalWrist
CervicalNeck
ClavicularOn each side of the suprastemal notch (small dip at top of the\r\nsternum)
InfraorbitalBelow the eyes
InfrascapularOn each side of the chest, down to the last rib
InterscapularOn the back, between scapulae (shoulder blades)
LumbarBelow the infrascapular area
MammaryBreast area
MentalRegion of the chin
NasalNose
OccipitalLower posterior head
OrbitalAround the eyes
PectoralChest
PoplitealBehind the knee
PubicBelow the hypogastric region (above the pubis)
SacralArea over the sacrum
SternalOver the sternum
SubmentalBelow the chin
SupraclavicularAbove the clavicles
\r\nMore body divisions are the regions of the spinal column, also known as the back.

Note the difference between the spinal column (the vertebrae) and the spinal cord (the nerves running through the column). The spinal column is made of bone tissue, and the spinal cord is composed of nerve tissue.\r\n\r\nThe spinal column is divided into five regions.

Begin at the top and work downward:\r\n

    \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The cervical region (abbreviation C) is located in the neck region. There are seven cervical vertebrae, C1 to C7.

    \r\n
  • \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The thoracic or dorsal region (abbreviation T or D) is located in the chest region.

    There are 12 thoracic or dorsal vertebrae, T1 to T12, or D1 to D12. Each bone in this segment is joined to a rib.

    \r\n
  • \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The lumbar region (abbreviation L) is located at the loin or the flank area between the ribs and the hip bone.

    There are five lumbar vertebrae, L1 to L5.

    \r\n
  • \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The sacral region (abbreviation S) has five bones, S1 to S5, that are fused to form one bone, the sacrum.

    \r\n
  • \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The coccygeal region includes the coccyx, or tailbone, a small bone composed of four fused pieces.

    \r\n
  • \r\n
\r\nCheck out the body’s anatomical positions and regions, planes, and cavities.\r\n
[caption id=\"\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"389\"]\"[Credit: Anatomical positions and regions of the body.[/caption]\r\n
Credit: Illustration by Kathryn Born
\r\n
\r\nIt is important to remember that all these terms are for directional purposes only.

They provide a road map to the body.\r\n

[caption id=\"\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"279\"]\"[Credit: Planes of the body.[/caption]\r\n
Credit: Illustration by Kathryn Born
\r\n
\r\nIn a medical examination, directional planes, regions of parts of the body with l abdomen, and divisions of the spinal column are used often by the examiner.\r\n
[caption id=\"\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"292\"]\"[Credit: The body’s cavities.[/caption]\r\n
Credit: Illustration by Kathryn Born
\r\n
","description":"Body parts and their accompanying medical terms don’t make a whole lot of sense until you can put them in the context of their general location within the body.

Your body can be defined in several different ways, from groups and regions to cavities and planes.\r\n\r\nBody regions are used to specifically identify a body area. To illustrate all that’s involved with a body region, take a closer look at two major regions: the abdominal and spinal.\r\n\r\nThe abdominal area is divided further into anatomic regions to diagnose abdominal problems with greater accuracy.\r\n\r\nStarting with the diaphragm, which is the muscle separating the thoracic cavity from the abdominal cavity, down to the level of the pelvis or groin, the abdominal area is divided into nine equal regions.\r\n\r\nVisualize the abdomen divided into nine squares: three across the top, three across the middle, and three across the bottom, like a tic-tac-toe board.

The center portion is the umbilical region, the region of the navel or the umbilicus. Directly above this is the epigastric region, or the region of the stomach. Directly below the umbilical region is the hypogastric region.\r\n\r\nOn either side of the epigastric region are the right and left hypochondriac regions. To the right and left of the umbilical region are the right and left lumbar regions. To the right and left of the hypogastric region are the right and left iliac regions.\r\n

The anatomical divisions of the abdomen are referenced in anatomy textbooks to specify where certain organs are found.

\r\nThe clinical regions of the abdomen are used to describe the abdomen when a patient is being examined.

The clinical regions of the abdomen divide the abdominal area, as above, into four equal quadrants:\r\n

    \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The right upper quadrant (RUQ) contains the right lobe of the liver, gallbladder, and parts of the small and large intestines.

    \r\n
  • \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The left upper quadrant (LUQ) contains the left lobe of the liver, stomach, pancreas, spleen, and parts of the small and large intestines.

    \r\n
  • \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The right lower quadrant (RLQ) contains parts of the small and large intestines, appendix, right ureter, right ovary, and fallopian tube.

    \r\n
  • \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The left lower quadrant (LLQ) contains parts of the small and large intestines, left ureter, left ovary, and fallopian tube.

    \r\n
  • \r\n
\r\nHere’s a quick look at some of the smaller body regions, beginning at the head and moving downward.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n
RegionWhere It Is
Auricular regionAround the ears
AxillaryAxillae (armpits)
BuccalCheeks of the face
CarpalWrist
CervicalNeck
ClavicularOn each side of the suprastemal notch (small dip at top of the\r\nsternum)
InfraorbitalBelow the eyes
InfrascapularOn each side of the chest, down to the last rib
InterscapularOn the back, between scapulae (shoulder blades)
LumbarBelow the infrascapular area
MammaryBreast area
MentalRegion of the chin
NasalNose
OccipitalLower posterior head
OrbitalAround the eyes
PectoralChest
PoplitealBehind the knee
PubicBelow the hypogastric region (above the pubis)
SacralArea over the sacrum
SternalOver the sternum
SubmentalBelow the chin
SupraclavicularAbove the clavicles
\r\nMore body divisions are the regions of the spinal column, also known as the back.

Note the difference between the spinal column (the vertebrae) and the spinal cord (the nerves running through the column). The spinal column is made of bone tissue, and the spinal cord is composed of nerve tissue.\r\n\r\nThe spinal column is divided into five regions.

Begin at the top and work downward:\r\n

    \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The cervical region (abbreviation C) is located in the neck region.

    There are seven cervical vertebrae, C1 to C7.

    \r\n
  • \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The thoracic or dorsal region (abbreviation T or D) is located in the chest region. There are 12 thoracic or dorsal vertebrae, T1 to T12, parts of the body with l D1 to D12.

    Each bone in this segment is joined to a rib.

    \r\n
  • \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The lumbar region (abbreviation L) is located at the loin or the flank area between the ribs and the hip bone.

    There are five lumbar vertebrae, L1 to L5.

    \r\n
  • \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The sacral region (abbreviation S) has five bones, S1 to S5, that are fused to form one bone, the sacrum.

    \r\n
  • \r\n \t
  • \r\n

    The coccygeal region includes the coccyx, or tailbone, a small bone composed of four fused pieces.

    \r\n
  • \r\n
\r\nCheck out the body’s anatomical positions and regions, planes, and cavities.\r\n
[caption id=\"\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"389\"]\"[Credit: Anatomical positions and regions of the body.[/caption]\r\n
Credit: Illustration by Kathryn Born
\r\n
\r\nIt is important to remember that all these terms are for directional purposes only.

They provide a road map to the body.\r\n

[caption id=\"\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"279\"]\"[Credit: Planes of the body.[/caption]\r\n
Credit: Illustration by Kathryn Born
\r\n
\r\nIn a medical examination, directional planes, regions of the abdomen, and divisions of the spinal column are used often by the examiner.\r\n
[caption id=\"\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"292\"]\"[Credit: The body’s cavities.[/caption]\r\n
Credit: Illustration by Kathryn Born
\r\n
","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":9294,"name":"Beverley Henderson","slug":"beverley-henderson","description":"Beverley Henderson, CMT-R, HRT, has more than 40 years of experience in medical terminology and transcription as both an educator and manager.","_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/authors/9294"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":34086,"title":"Terminology","slug":"terminology","_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/categories/34086"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[{"articleId":267149,"title":"How the Urinary System Works","slug":"how-the-urinary-system-works","categoryList":["body-mind-spirit","medical","terminology"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/267149"}},{"articleId":267144,"title":"Integumentary System: Glands, Hair, and Nails","slug":"integumentary-system-glands-hair-and-nails","categoryList":["body-mind-spirit","medical","terminology"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/267144"}},{"articleId":267136,"title":"How the Muscular System Works","slug":"how-the-muscular-system-works","categoryList":["body-mind-spirit","medical","terminology"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/267136"}},{"articleId":267130,"title":"How the Skeletal System Works","slug":"how-the-skeletal-system-works","categoryList":["body-mind-spirit","medical","terminology"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/267130"}},{"articleId":209448,"title":"Medical Terminology For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"medical-terminology-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["body-mind-spirit","medical","terminology"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/209448"}}],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":267149,"title":"How the Urinary System Works","slug":"how-the-urinary-system-works","categoryList":["body-mind-spirit","medical","terminology"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/267149"}},{"articleId":267144,"title":"Integumentary System: Glands, Hair, and Nails","slug":"integumentary-system-glands-hair-and-nails","categoryList":["body-mind-spirit","medical","terminology"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/267144"}},{"articleId":267136,"title":"How the Muscular System Works","slug":"how-the-muscular-system-works","categoryList":["body-mind-spirit","medical","terminology"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/267136"}},{"articleId":267130,"title":"How the Skeletal System Works","slug":"how-the-skeletal-system-works","categoryList":["body-mind-spirit","medical","terminology"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/267130"}},{"articleId":209448,"title":"Medical Terminology For Dummies Cheat Sheet","slug":"medical-terminology-for-dummies-cheat-sheet","categoryList":["body-mind-spirit","medical","terminology"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/209448"}}]},"relatedBook":{"bookId":282388,"slug":"medical-terminology-for-dummies-3rd-edition","isbn":"9781119625476","isbn10":"1119625475","categoryList":["body-mind-spirit","medical","terminology"],"amazon":{"default":"https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119625475/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119625475/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"http://www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=https://www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119625475-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119625475/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119625475/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"https://www.dummies.com/wp-content/uploads/medical-terminology-for-dummies-3rd-edition-cover-9781119625476-203x255.jpg","width":203,"height":255},"title":"Medical Terminology For Dummies, 3rd Edition","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"\n

Beverley Henderson, CMT-R, HRT, has more than 40 years of experience in medical terminology and transcription as both an educator and manager.

Jennifer L. Dorsey, PhD, has coauthored, revised, and ghostwritten books in the medical, business, and personal growth categories for more than 20 years.

","authors":[{"authorId":9294,"name":"Beverley Henderson","slug":"beverley-henderson","description":"Beverley Henderson, CMT-R, HRT, has more than 40 years of experience in medical terminology and transcription as both an educator and manager.","_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/authors/9294"}},{"authorId":9295,"name":"Jennifer L.

Dorsey","slug":"jennifer-lee-dorsey","description":"Jennifer L. Dorsey, PhD, has coauthored, revised, and ghostwritten books in the medical, business, and personal growth categories for more than 20 years.","_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/authors/9295"}}],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/books/"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"

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"},"articleType":{"articleType":"Articles","articleList":null,"content":null,"videoInfo":{"videoId":null,"name":null,"accountId":null,"playerId":null,"thumbnailUrl":null,"description":null,"uploadDate":null}},"sponsorship":{"sponsorshipPage":false,"backgroundImage":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0},"brandingLine":"","brandingLink":"","brandingLogo":{"src":null,"width":0,"height":0}},"primaryLearningPath":"Advance","lifeExpectancy":null,"lifeExpectancySetFrom":null,"dummiesForKids":"no","sponsoredContent":"no","adInfo":"","adPairKey":[]},"status":"publish","visibility":"public","articleId":145572},"articleLoadedStatus":"success"},"listState":{"list":{},"objectTitle":"","status":"initial","pageType":null,"objectId":null,"page":1,"sortField":"time","sortOrder":1,"categoriesIds":[],"articleTypes":[],"filterData":{},"filterDataLoadedStatus":"initial","pageSize":10},"adsState":{"pageScripts":{"headers":{"timestamp":"2022-05-03T18:59:03+00:00"},"adsId":0,"data":{"scripts":[{"pages":["all"],"location":"header","script":"\r\n","enabled":false},{"pages":["all"],"location":"header","script":"\r\n\r\n","enabled":true},{"pages":["all"],"location":"footer","script":"\r\n
\r\n","enabled":false},{"pages":["all"],"location":"header","script":"\r\n","enabled":false},{"pages":["article"],"location":"header","script":" ","enabled":true},{"pages":["homepage"],"location":"header","script":"","enabled":true},{"pages":["homepage","article","category","search"],"location":"footer","script":"\r\n\r\n","enabled":true}]}},"pageScriptsLoadedStatus":"success"},"searchState":{"searchList":[],"searchStatus":"initial","relatedArticlesList":[],"relatedArticlesStatus":"initial"},"routeState":{"name":"Article3","path":"/article/body-mind-spirit/medical/terminology/medical-terminology-for-regions-of-the-body-145572/","hash":"","query":{},"params":{"category1":"body-mind-spirit","category2":"medical","category3":"terminology","article":"medical-terminology-for-regions-of-the-body-145572"},"fullPath":"/article/body-mind-spirit/medical/terminology/medical-terminology-for-regions-of-the-body-145572/","meta":{"routeType":"article","breadcrumbInfo":{"suffix":"Articles","baseRoute":"/category/articles"},"prerenderWithAsyncData":true},"from":{"name":null,"path":"/","hash":"","query":{},"params":{},"fullPath":"/","meta":{}}},"dropsState":{"submitEmailResponse":false,"status":"initial"},"sfmcState":{"newsletterSignupStatus":"initial"}} Body parts and their accompanying medical terms don’t make a whole lot of sense until you can put them in the context of their general location within the body.

Your body can be defined in several different ways, from groups and regions to cavities and planes. Body regions are used to specifically identify a body area.

To illustrate all that’s involved with a body region, take a parts of the body with l look at two major regions: the abdominal and spinal. The abdominal area is divided further into anatomic regions to diagnose abdominal problems with greater accuracy. Starting with the diaphragm, which is the muscle separating parts of the body with l thoracic cavity from the abdominal cavity, down to the level of the pelvis or groin, the abdominal area is divided into nine equal regions.

Visualize the abdomen divided into nine squares: three across the top, three across the middle, and three across the bottom, like a tic-tac-toe board. The center portion is the umbilical region, the region of the navel or the umbilicus. Directly above this is the epigastric region, or the region of the stomach. Directly below the umbilical region is the hypogastric region. On either side of the epigastric region are the right and left hypochondriac regions.

parts of the body with l

To the right and left of the umbilical region are the right and left lumbar regions. To the right and left of the hypogastric region are the right and left iliac regions. The anatomical divisions of the abdomen are referenced in anatomy textbooks to specify where certain organs are found. The clinical regions of the abdomen are used to describe the abdomen when a patient is being examined. The clinical regions of the abdomen divide the abdominal area, as above, into four equal quadrants: • The right upper quadrant (RUQ) contains the right lobe of the liver, gallbladder, and parts of the small and large intestines.

• The left upper quadrant (LUQ) contains the left lobe of the liver, stomach, pancreas, spleen, and parts of the small and large intestines. • The right lower quadrant (RLQ) contains parts of the small and large intestines, appendix, right ureter, right ovary, and fallopian tube. • The left lower quadrant (LLQ) contains parts of the small and large intestines, left ureter, left ovary, and fallopian tube. Here’s a quick look at some of the smaller body regions, beginning at the head and moving downward.

Region Where It Is Auricular region Around the ears Axillary Axillae (armpits) Buccal Cheeks of the face Carpal Wrist Cervical Neck Clavicular On each side of the suprastemal notch (small dip at top of the sternum) Infraorbital Below the eyes Infrascapular On each side of the chest, down to the last rib Interscapular On the back, between scapulae (shoulder blades) Lumbar Below the infrascapular area Mammary Breast area Mental Region of the chin Nasal Nose Occipital Lower posterior head Orbital Around the eyes Pectoral Chest Popliteal Behind the knee Pubic Below the hypogastric region (above the pubis) Sacral Area over the sacrum Sternal Over the sternum Submental Below the chin Supraclavicular Above the clavicles More body divisions are the regions of the spinal column, also known as the back.

Note the difference between the spinal column (the vertebrae) and the spinal cord (the nerves running through the column). The spinal column is made of bone tissue, and the spinal cord is composed of nerve tissue. The spinal column is divided into five regions. Begin at the top and work downward: • The cervical region (abbreviation C) is located in the neck region. There are seven cervical vertebrae, C1 to C7.

• The thoracic or dorsal region (abbreviation T or D) is located in the chest region. There are 12 thoracic or dorsal vertebrae, T1 to T12, or D1 to D12. Each bone in this segment is joined to a rib. • The lumbar region (abbreviation L) is located at the loin or the flank area between the ribs and the hip bone. There are five lumbar vertebrae, L1 to L5. • The sacral region (abbreviation S) has five parts of the body with l, S1 to S5, that are fused to form one bone, the sacrum.

• The coccygeal region includes the coccyx, or tailbone, a small bone composed of four fused pieces. Check out the body’s anatomical positions and regions, planes, and cavities. About the book authors: Beverley Henderson, CMT-R, HRT, has more than 40 years of experience in medical terminology and transcription as both an educator and manager. Jennifer L. Dorsey, PhD, has coauthored, revised, and ghostwritten books in the medical, business, and personal growth categories for more than 20 years.

Dummies has always stood for taking on complex concepts and making them easy to understand. Dummies helps everyone be more knowledgeable and confident in applying what they know.

Whether it's to pass that big test, qualify for that big promotion or even master that cooking technique; people who rely on dummies, rely on it to learn the critical skills and relevant information necessary for success. • Health A-Z • COVID-19 • Arthritis • Type 2 Diabetes • Heart Disease • Digestive Health • Multiple Sclerosis • View All • Prevention & Treatment • COVID-19 Vaccines • Vaccines • First Aid • Surgery • Occupational Therapy • Healthy Aging • View All • Health Care • Health Insurance • Public Health • Patient Rights • Health Technology • Caregivers & Loved Ones • End of Life Concerns • View All • News • COVID-19 • Health News • Tools & Resources • COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Tracker • Thyroid Test Analyzer • Doctor Discussion Guides • Hemoglobin A1c Test Analyzer • Lipid Test Analyzer • Complete Blood Count (CBC) Analyzer • Healthy Conversations Coach • About Us • Editorial Process • Medical Expert Board More in Orthopedics • Orthopedic Surgery • Post-Operative Recovery • Home Office Ergonomics • Sprains & Strains • Fractures & Broken Bones • Physical Therapy • Osteoporosis • Pediatric Orthopedics • Sports Injuries • Shoulder & Elbow • Hip & Knee parts of the body with l Hand & Wrist • Leg, Foot & Ankle • Assistive Devices & Orthotics • Medication & Injections View More Tools & Resources • COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Tracker • Thyroid Test Analyzer • Doctor Discussion Guides • Hemoglobin A1c Test Analyzer • Lipid Test Analyzer • Complete Blood Count (CBC) Analyzer • Healthy Conversations Coach • Colon Cancer Symptoms • What Is Adenovirus?

• Remdesivir for COVID-19 • Omicron Symptom Duration • What's Next For COVID-19? • Travel Insurance for COVID • Health A-Z • COVID-19 • Arthritis • Type 2 Diabetes • Heart Disease • Digestive Health • Multiple Sclerosis • View All • Prevention & Treatment • COVID-19 Vaccines • Vaccines • First Aid • Surgery • Occupational Therapy • Healthy Aging • View All • Health Care • Health Insurance • Public Health • Patient Rights • Health Technology • Caregivers & Loved Ones • End of Life Concerns • View All • News • COVID-19 • Health News • View All Thomas Barwick / Getty Images Many people refer to the lower extremity as the leg.

In fact, the leg is the part of the body between the knee and ankle joints. The proper parts of the body with l to describe the lower limb is the lower extremity. Â This may seem like a minor detail. However, when medical information is transferred between hospitals, doctors, and other medical professionals, it is important to use the same language.

In anatomic terms, the body is described as follows. • Blood Supply: The lower extremity is supplied by the femoral artery.

parts of the body with l

The blood returns via superficial saphenous veins and deep veins that include the femoral, popliteal, anterior tibial, posterior tibial, and fibular vein.

Deep vein thrombosis is a dangerous condition when clots form in these veins. • Nerves: The lower limb nerves branch from the lumbosacral plexus. The sciatic nerve runs from the pelvis down the back of each leg and divides into a peroneal and tibial nerve to control the legs and feet.

Damage to the peroneal nerve can cause foot drop, a loss of sensation to the top of the foot and inability to lift the foot. Compression of the spinal nerves can cause pain to radiate along the sciatic nerve, known as sciatica. • Bones and Joints: The lower limb is attached via the hip joint to the pelvic bones. The femur, or thigh bone, extends down to the knee joint and articulates with the patella. The bones of the leg include the larger tibia (shin bone) and the smaller fibula.

They connect via the ankle joint with the tarsal bones, which include the talus, the calcaneus (heel bone), cuboid, navicular, and the cuneiform bones. These connect via the metatarsophalangeal joints to the five metatarsal bones of the foot, which in turn connect to the phalanges of the toes, which have interphalangeal joints. Fractures of the bones and injuries to the joints of the lower extremity are common. Knee and hip replacements are often done when the joints are degraded by osteoarthritis.

• Muscles: The muscles of the lower limb include the parts of the body with l and longest ones of the body, as they must be to power walking and standing upright. These muscles move the thigh and leg and control the foot. They include the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, iliopsoas, adductor muscles, parts of the body with l, and gracilis of the hip.

The thigh muscles include the quadriceps in front and the hamstring muscles in the back. The calf muscles include the gastrocnemius, soleus, peroneus longus, tibialis anterior, flexor digitorum longus, and extensor digitorum longus. The Achilles tendon is a prominent cord attaching to the heel bone and is the largest tendon in the body. • Anderson BW, Bordoni B. Anatomy, appendicular skeleton. StatPearls. • Molina CS, Faulk JB. Lower extremity amputation.

StatPearls. • Maduri P, Akhondi H. Upper limb amputation. StatPearls. • Waheed SM, Hotwagner DT. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT). StatPearls. • Lezak B, Massel DH, Varacallo M. Peroneal (fibular) nerve injury.

parts of the body with l

StatPearls. • Wong M, Kiel J. Anatomy, bony pelvis and lower limb, Achilles tendon. StatPearls. Sign Up You're in! Thank you, {{form.email}}, for signing up. There was an error. Please try again. • Health A-Z • Prevention & Treatment • Health Care • News • Medical Expert Board • About Us • Editorial Process • Anti-Racism Pledge • Privacy Policy • In the News • Cookie Policy • Advertise • Terms of Use • Careers • California Privacy Notice • Contact • EU Privacy When you visit this site, it may store or retrieve information on your browser, mostly in the form of cookies.

Cookies collect information about your preferences and your device and are used to make the site parts of the body with l as you expect it to, to understand how you interact with the site, and to show advertisements that are targeted to your interests. You can find out more and change our default settings with Cookie Settings.
The lumbar vertebrae are the largest movable bones of the backbone.

Their larger size and bone strength is necessary because these vertebrae support more weight than the upper two segments of the backbone. The spinal column is connected at the base of the pelvic bone, and extends up along the back to the base of the skull. Each vertebra in the spinal column is shaped to protect the spinal cord from injury, and also has enough movement and flexibility to bend and twist to allow the necessary movements of the body.

The L2 vertebra parts of the body with l located in the lower curvature of the spine, and the portion of the spinal cord that it protects is known as the lumbar cord.

Injury in this area can cause nerve damage, loss of feeling in the lower extremities, and difficulty with walking and movement. Last medically reviewed on February 25, 2015 Are you searching for a list of human body parts? Then, you have clicked on the right page. This article presents a list of human organs and provides the related information too. Scroll down and take a look at the list and some interesting facts about the human body.

We are familiar with the exterior body parts like ear, eye, nose, hands, and legs but we might not be knowing about all the internal human organs. Before reading the body parts list, take a look at different human body systems so that it will be easier to understand how the body functions as a self-sustaining single unit. Major Human Body Systems • Circulatory System: Pumps and channels blood to and from the body and lungs, plays an important role in the transportation of nutrients, gases, hormones and wastes through the body.

It consists of heart, blood and blood vessels. • Digestive System: Parts of the body with l and processes the ingested food. It is involved in the breakdown and absorption of nutrients and it promotes growth and maintenance.

It consists of salivary glands, esophagus, stomach, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, intestines, rectum, and anus. • Endocannabinoid System: Consists of neuromodulatory lipids and receptors which help in a variety of physiological processes including appetite, pain-sensation, mood, motor learning, synaptic plasticity, and memory. • Endocrine System: Communicates within the body using hormones made by endocrine glands like the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, pineal gland, thyroid, parathyroid and adrenal glands.

Hormones control the physiological processes in the body and psychological behavior of the person. • Integumentary System: Consists of skin, hair, and nails. • Immune System: Fights off diseases, consists of leukocytes, tonsils, adenoids, thymus, and spleen. • Lymphatic System: Transfers lymph between tissues and the bloodstream, consists of the lymph and lymph nodes and vessels that transport it.

• Musculoskeletal System: Helps move the body with muscles and tendons. Movement of the muscles promotes movement of fluids, food or blood (for example, in the stomach, intestines, and heart).

It consists of both skeletal and smooth muscles. • Nervous System: Gathering, processing and transferring information to and from the body with the brain, spinal cord, and the nerves. • Reproductive System: Female reproductive system consists of ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, vagina, mammary glands, and the male reproductive system consists of testes, vas deferens, seminal vesicles, prostate, and penis.

• Respiratory System: Breathing system that helps absorb oxygen from the air and expel carbon dioxide from the body. It consists of the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, lungs, and diaphragm.

• Skeletal System: Gives shape to the body and holds the body. It protects the delicate organs. It consists of bones, cartilage, ligaments, and tendons. • Urinary System: Maintains fluid balance, electrolyte balance and administers excretion of urine. It helps get rid of the cellular wastes, toxins, excess water or nutrients from the circulatory system. It consists of kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra.

• Vestibular System: It helps maintain the balance of the body and the sense of spatial orientation. Human Body Let us now divide the body into different regions; so that it will be easier to make a body parts list. Regional Parts • Head and Neck: The upper region of the body includes everything above the neck, for instance, hair, scalp, eyes, ears, nose, mouth, tongue, teeth, etc.

• Upper Limb: This region includes the shoulder, arm, hand, wrist, forearm, elbow and fingers. • Thorax: This is the region of the chest from the thoracic inlet to the thoracic diaphragm. • Middle Region: This includes human abdomen to the pelvic brim or to the pelvic inlet. • Back Region: The region includes the spine and its components, the vertebrae, sacrum, coccyx, and intervertebral discs.

parts of the body with l

• Pelvic Region: This region includes the pelvis which consists of everything from the pelvic inlet to the pelvic diaphragm. The perineum is the region that consists of the sex organs and the anus. • Lower Limb Region: This includes everything below the inguinal ligament, including the hip, the thigh, the knee, the leg, the ankle and the foot. Internal Parts For the sake of convenience, you may divide body organs into ‘Organs on the left side of the body’ and ‘Organs on the right side of parts of the body with l human body’.

Here is a list of the main internal organs of the human body. • Adrenals • Appendix • Bladder • Brain • Esophagus • Eyes parts of the body with l Gallbladder • Heart • Intestines • Kidney • Liver • Lung • Ovaries • Pancreas • Parathyroids • Pituitary • Prostate • Spleen • Stomach • Testicles • Thymus • Thyroid • Parts of the body with l • Veins It is just impossible to mention all the organs, here.

Almost every organ is made up of various parts which can also be named separately as organs. For example, the brain consists of Amygdala, Brainstem, Cerebellum, Cerebral cortex, Limbic system, Medulla, Midbrain, and Pons.

There are specific names for the nerves, muscles, bones, tendons etc. which are present at the given specific locations. For instance, Achilles tendon, Bachmann’s bundle, Ducts of Bellini, Darwin’s tubercle, etc. External Parts • Head • Forehead • Jaw • Cheek • Chin • Eye • Ear • Nose • Mouth • Teeth • Tongue • Throat • Neck • Adam’s apple • Shoulders • Arm • Elbow • Wrist • Hand • Fingers • Thumb • Spine • Chest • Thorax • Breast • Abdomen • Groin • Hip • Buttocks • Navel • Penis • Scrotum • Clitoris • Vulva • Leg • Thigh • Knee • Calf • Heel • Ankle • Foot • Toes Anatomical charts and models of bodily systems help study human physiology.

The human body, a scientific marvel has always been an interesting topic for various researches related to body mechanisms like aging, fighting diseases, the effect of stress on health, etc. This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website.

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The human body collectively is the most complex machine known to man, Like any machine, the human body is made of different body parts situated in some particular way with the goal of performing some function.

This list of human body parts includes common anatomical divisions and the body parts that compose those divisions. “The human body is strange and flawed and unpredictable. The human body has many secrets, and it does not divulge them to anyone, except those who have learned to wait.” — Paul Auster The study of the macroscopic morphology and function of the human body is called gross anatomy.

In general, the human body can be divided into 3 main anatomical areas: head, torso, and limbs. In addition to the physical external parts, the human body can also be divided by organ system and the parts that compose those systems.

The main organ systems of the human body are the respiratory system, the vascular system, the skeletal system, and the digestive system. Human Body By Anatomical Region Head The human head consists of a fleshy outer portion covering a bony substructure called the skull.

The primary purpose of the head is to contain and support the brain and primary sensory organs such as the mouth, eyes, ears, and nose. The head is probably one of the more delicate parts of the human body, as the vascular and musculature structures of the head consist of a number of small interconnected parts that need to be situated very particularly to function properly.

The parts of the human head include: • Skull • Cranium (holds the brain) • Mandibles (lower jaw) • Maxilla (upper jaw) • Nasal bone • Zygomatic bone (eye sockets) • Face • Eyes • Nose • Ears • Mouth • Tongue • Teeth • Cheeks • Chin • Neck • Trachea • Esophagus • Cervical vertebrae Torso Credit: MedicalGraphics (CC BY-ND 4.0) The torso or “trunk” is the largest section of the human body and composes the bulk of the human body.

The main function of the torso is to provide shape and structure to the human body and to house its vital internal organs such as the heart, lungs, stomach, intestines, liver, and kidneys. The torso also contains the majority of blood vessels that provide oxygen to the whole body.

The parts of the human torso include: • Shoulders • Chest • Pectoralis (upper chest) • Ribcage • Lungs • Heart • Upper Abdomen • Abdominal muscles • Stomach • Kidneys • Liver • Lower Abdomen • Small Intestines • Large Intestines • Colon • Rectum • Posterior • Spine • Gluteus maximus (buttocks) Limbs The next important division of the human boy is its 4 limbs.

The limbs are attached to the torso and their primary purpose is to interact with the environment via locomotion with the legs and manipulating objects with the arms.

Humans are unique among tetrapods (organisms with 4 limbs) in that 2 are specialized for locomotion (legs/feet) and 2 are specialized for manipulating objects (arms/hands). Except for some parts of the face, the limbs, the hands in feet, in particular, contain the most nerve endings are so are specialized to sense touch.

The main limbs of the human body are: • Arms • Brachium (upper arm) • Humerus • Biceps • Triceps • Elbow • Forearm • Ulna • Radius • Hand • Carpals • Metacarpals • Legs • Thigh • Quadriceps • Hamstring • Knee • Crus (lower leg) • Shin • Tibia • Fibia • Ankle • Foot • Tarsals • Metatarsals Human Body Parts By Organ System In addition to dividing the human body by anatomical region, one can also categorize the parts of the human body by organ system.

In a nutshell, an organ system is a collective group of organs that work together to perform some specific function. The major organ systems of the human body are the respiratory system, vascular system, skeletal system, and the digestive system.

Respiratory System The main function of the respiratory system is to facilitate the intake and removal of gaseous materials from the body. The respiratory system is the main mechanism by which the body replenishes its oxygen supplies and removes waste products from cellular respiration such as carbon dioxide.

Parts of the body with l main body parts of the human respiratory system are: • Trachea • Bronchioles • Lungs • Alveoli • Diaphragm Through the coordinated functioning of these parts, the body is able to inhale air, extract oxygen from the air, remove carbon dioxide from the blood and expel gaseous waste. Vascular System The purpose of the vascular system (circulatory system) is to facilitate the transfer of oxygen saturated blood to the various extremities of the body and move de-oxygenated blood from those extremities to the lungs for reoxygenation.

The vascular system also serves to circulate heat to the body. The vascular system is the single largest system in the body by length. If you took every blood vessel in the human body and laid them end to end, the resulting chain would stretch for 60,000 miles. The main parts of the human vascular system are: • Heart • Blood Vessels • Arteries • Veins • Capillaries • Blood The exact boundaries of the vascular system are somewhat fuzzy, as virtually every other organ system incorporates some aspect of the vascular system in their functioning.

The lymph system uses the vascular system to remove pathogens from the body, and the kidneys and liver serve to remove toxins from the blood.

parts of the body with l

Skeletal System The skeletal system serves primarily to give the body physical structure and support its other parts. Human babies are initially born with 270 separate bones. Over time some of these bones will fuse together putting the grand total of bones in the adult skeletal system at 206. The largest bone in the body is the femur (thigh bone) and the smallest bone is the stirrup, one of the 3 ossicles in the human inner ear.

Some of the main parts of the skeletal system are: • Skull • Vertebrae (spine) • Scapula (shoulder blades) • Ribs • Humerus • Ulna • Radius • Pelvis • Carpals/Metacarpals (hand bones) • Femur • Patella (kneecap) • Tibia (front of the shin) • Fibia • Tarsals/Metatarsals (foot bones) Digestive System The digestive system serves primarily to process and absorb nutrients from food.

Most of the digestive muscles are contained in the torso and are composed of smooth muscle. Interestingly enough, the process of digestion actually begins before you even put any food in your mouth; it starts with salivary glands producing saliva in response to the sight and smell of food.

The main parts of the human digestive system are: • Mouth • Esophagus • Stomach • Small Intestines • Large Intestine • Rectum There parts of the body with l more organ systems in the body like the nervous system, endocrine system, urinary system, and the integumentary system (skin/nails/hair).

Each of these organ systems can be decomposed into parts and all these organ systems work together to produce the proper functioning of the human body.
Human Body Parts List Picture of Internal Organs Parts of the Body 1. head 2. arm 3. back 4. waist 5. buttocks/ backside 6. leg 7. face 8. chest 9. stomach 10. hip 11.

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hand 12. foot 13. eye 14. eyebrow 15. nose 16. mouth 17. chin 18. hair 19. ear 20. lips 21. neck 22. nail 23. thumb 24. finger 25. wrist 26. palm 27. shoulder 28. forearm 29. upper arm 30. elbow 31. knee 32.

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thigh 33. shin 34. calf 35. ankle 36. heel 37. toe 1. forehead 2. temple 3. eyebrow 4. eyelid 5. eyelash 6. pupil 7. cheek 8. teeth 9. tooth 10. tongue 11. brain 12.

parts of the body with l

throat 13. vein 14. artery 15. lung 16. liver 17. stomach 18. large intestine 19. small intstine 20. muscle 21. lung 22. heart 23. kidney 24. skeleton 25. skull 26. ribs 27. breastbone/ sternum 28. spine/ backbone 29. hip-bone 30. pelvis 31. kneecap Body Parts Names 1. face; 2. mouth; 3. chin; 4. neck; 5. shoulder; 6. arm; 7. upper arm; 8. elbow; 9. forearm; 10. armpit; 11. back; 12. chest; 13.

waist; 14. abdomen; 28. shoulder 29. chest 30. abdomen 15. buttocks; 16. hip; 17. leg; 18. thigh; 19. knee; 20. calf; 31. back; 32. arm; 33. armpit 34.

parts of the body with l

elbow; 35. waist 36. hip; 37. bullocks; 38. leg 39. thigh; 40. knee; 41. calf 42. shin Temple Body Part Parts of the Body Male skull, temple, ear, forehead, face, Adam’s appleshoulder, nipple, breast, armpit, thorax, navel, abdomen, pubis, groin, knee, foot, toe, ankle, instep MAN POSTERIOR VIEW hair, head, nape, neck, shoulder blade, armback, elbow, waist, trunk, hip forearm, wrist, loin, hand, thigh, buttock, calf, leg, heel, foot Parts of the Body Girl eye, nose, cheek, chin, mouth, neck, shoulder, armpit, breast, thorax, navel, abdomen, publs, groin, knee, foot, ankle, toe HUMAN BODY WOMAN POSTERIOR VIEW hair.

nape, head, neck, shoulder blade, arm, elbow, back, waist, trunk, loin, hip, forearm, wrist, hand, buttock, thigh, leg, calf, foot, heel. BOY, GIRL CHILDREN BODY Head, arm, chest, stomach, knee, leg ankle, heel, foot, toe, wrist, thumb, hand, finger HEAD PARTS 30. hair; 31.

part; 32. forehead; 33. sideburn; 34. ear; 35. cheek;36. nose; 37. nostril; 38. jaw; 39. beard; 40. mustache; 41. tongue; 42. tooth; 43. lip; 1. head; 2. hair; 3. forehead 4. temple; 5.

face 13. parts of the body with l 14. earlobe 15. nose; 16. nostril; 17. cheek 18. jaw; 19. mouth; 20. lip 21. tooth-teeth; 22. tongue; 23. chin 24. sideburn 25. mustache 26. beard 27. neck FACE PART NAMES face, hair, skin, eyebrow, eyelash, ear, nose, mole, lip, chin, forehead, temple, eye, cheek, nostril, mouth, jaw Clown head: forehead hải eye eyebrow check nóe lip mouth tongue forehead, eyebrows, cheeks, lip, teeth, chin mustache, moustache, ears, beard Eye parts names 44.

eyebrow;; 45. eyelid; 46. eyelashes; 47. iris; 48. pupil; 6. eye; 7. eyebrow; 8. eyelid 9.

parts of the body with l

eyelashes; 10. iris; 11. pupil 12. cornea HAND PARTS NAME 21. wrist; 22. knuckle; 23. fingernail; 24. thumb; 25. (index) finger; 26. middle finger; 27. ring finger; 28. little finger; 29. palm; 43. hand; 44. wrist; 45. thumb 46. (index) finger; 47. middle finger 48. ring finger; 49.

pinky/little finger 50.

parts of the body with l

palm; 51. fingernail; 52. knuckle SENSE ORGANS- TOUCH -HAND palm, middle finger, third finger, little finger, index fingerfingernaill, thumb, lunulawrist ring finger, middle finger, index finger, little finger, wrist, palm, thumb, nail, cuticle, knuckle FOOT PARTS NAMES 49. ankle; 50.

parts of the body with l

heel; 51. instep; 52. ball; 53. big toe; 54. toe; 55. little toe; 56. toenail; 53. foot; 54. ankle; 55. heel; 56. toe 57. little toe; 58. big toe; 59. toenail 60. skin toe, ball, sole, instep, arch, heel, big toe, bridge, toenail, little toe, ankle Body Parts Pictures for Classroom and Therapy Ankle, Aorta, Back, Backwards, Bite, Blue+Eyes, Body, Body Parts, Bone, Brain, Brown Eyes, Butt, Calf, Calves, Cartoon Eyes Cerebellum, Cheek, Cheeks, Chin, Dimples, Ear, Earache Ealobe, Ears, Elbow, Eye, Eyebrow, Eyelash, Eyelid, Eyes, Finger Fingernails, Fingers Crossed, Fist, Foot, Footprints, Forehead, Green Eyes, Hand, Head, Heel Heels, Hip, Human Heart, Inferior Vena Cava, Jaw, Kidney, Kidneys, Kiss, Knee, Lap, Legs, Lips Liver, Lungs, Mouth, Muscle, Mustache, Neck, Nose, Okay, Palm Pituitary Gland, Pregnancy, Pulmonary Artery, Raise Hand, Ribs, Rub Tummy, Shadow, Shoulder, Skeleton, Skull, Smile, Spine Spine, Stomach, Superior Vena Cava, Taste, Teeth, Tip Toe, Toes, Tongue, Tongue on side, Tongue on side, Tongue Out, Tongue Up, Tonsils, Tooth Touch, Unibrow, Uvula, WrishX-ray arm body back bottom chin chest ear elbow eyes hand fingers feet head knees leg mouth nose shoulders stomach toes El cuerpo humano en diccionario de imágenes Afrikaans Albanian Amharic Arabic Parts of the body with l Azerbaijani Basque Belarusian Bengali Bosnian Bulgarian Catalan Cebuano Chichewa Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional) Corsican Croatian Czech Danish Dutch English Esperanto Estonian Filipino Finnish French Frisian Galician Georgian German Greek Gujarati Haitian Creole Hausa Hawaiian Hebrew Hindi Hmong Hungarian Icelandic Igbo Indonesian Irish Italian Japanese Javanese Kannada Kazakh Khmer Korean Kurdish (Kurmanji) Kyrgyz Lao Latin Latvian Lithuanian Luxembourgish Macedonian Malagasy Malay Malayalam Maltese Maori Marathi Mongolian Myanmar (Burmese) Nepali Norwegian Pashto Persian Polish Portuguese Punjabi Romanian Russian Samoan Scottish Gaelic Serbian Sesotho Shona Sindhi Sinhala Slovak Slovenian Somali Spanish Sudanese Swahili Swedish Tajik Tamil Telugu Thai Turkish Ukrainian Urdu Uzbek Vietnamese Welsh Xhosa Yiddish Yoruba ZuluERROR: The request could not be satisfied 403 ERROR The request could not be satisfied.

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