Great dane

great dane

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• They are known as the “Apollo of dogs” due to their stately grace. • Like other large breeds, they can be susceptible great dane health issues.

They’re certainly great, but did you know they’re not Danish? Dogs resembling Great Danes appear as far back as ancient Egyptian carvings, but the modern Great Dane was actually bred in Germany in the 1800s as a boar-hunting beast.

Today, these gentle giants make beloved family pets, and are often described as “the Apollo of dogs”, thanks to their grace, courage, stature, and beauty. Here’s everything else you need to know about these colossal canines: 1. Great Danes are the tallest dogs in the world. A male Great Dane great dane reach up to 32 inches at the shoulder and weigh a massive 175 pounds.

Females are slightly smaller, at up to 30 inches and 140 pounds — and both males and females can tower over many humans when they stand on their hind legs. Despite their size, Great Danes are elegant, and even regal in their gait and disposition. 2. Despite their daunting size, Danes are highly affectionate and social.

These pups love love. They need lots of affection and socialization with people and other animals, making them great family pets. Thanks to their sweet, gentle, patient dispositions, Danes are even great with kids — though like all dogs, they should never be left alone with young children, and they’ll need to be taught not to play as rough as they would with a puppy.

3. Daily exercise is a must for this big breed. You won’t need to run a daily marathon with your Great Dane, but they will need activity. Two brisk walks great dane decent length should do it, though remember that puppies have more energy and should be exercised accordingly.

As adults, Great Danes are happy jogging companions, but it’s important to wait until they’re at least two years old, as running before then can damage their bones. 4. Great Danes tend to follow their noses. These dogs were great dane to hunt boar, and if they get a scent, they’ll want to follow it. Walks should be on-leash, and at home, and any yard will need to be securely fenced. 5. Proper training is essential with Great Danes. With dogs this big and powerful, it’s important that they obey commands and are properly socialized.

Luckily, Danes are mostly friendly and eager to please, making training a pleasure (though beware the odd stubborn streak). Buying from a reputable breeder also ensures good socialization in the crucial early months of the dog’s life.

6. These outsize athletes love dog sports. As strong, intelligent working dogs, Great Danes are wonderful competitors in a variety of dog sports, including AgilityObedienceTrackingweight pullsand Flyball. 7. Big breeds have big needs. A Great Dane can cost a lot more to feed than a small dog, in addition to incurring higher-than-average medical fees and wear-and-tear to your home and great dane.

If you’re bringing a Great Dane into your life, be aware that owning one will not come cheap.

great dane

8. Great Danes have a relatively low life expectancy. These gentle giants sadly tend to live just seven to ten years — though they will certainly fill those years with several lifetimes’ worth of love. • be_ixf; php_sdk; php_sdk_1.4.18 • 27 ms • iy_2022; im_05; id_08; ih_08; imh_21; i_epoch:1652023312434 • ixf-compiler; ixf-compiler_1.0.0.0 • py_2022; pm_05; pd_03; ph_23; pmh_23; p_epoch:1651645387669 • link-block-publisher; link-block-publisher_link-block-publisher; bodystr • pn_tstr:Tue May 03 23:23:07 PST 2022; pn_epoch:1651645387669 • 0 ms Great Dane Puppies For Sale - AKC PuppyFinder • be_ixf; php_sdk; php_sdk_1.4.18 • 9 ms • iy_2022; im_05; id_08; ih_08; imh_28; i_epoch:1652023724745 • ixf-compiler; ixf-compiler_1.0.0.0 • py_2022; pm_05; pd_03; ph_20; pmh_39; p_epoch:1651635574852 • link-block-publisher; link-block-publisher_link-block-publisher; bodystr • pn_tstr:Tue May 03 20:39:34 PST 2022; pn_epoch:1651635574852 • 0 ms • be_ixf; php_sdk; php_sdk_1.4.18 • https://marketplace.akc.org/puppies/great-dane • https://marketplace.akc.org/puppies/great-dane
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• List of Great Dane Mix Breed Dogs • Dog DNA Tests Other Names • Deutsche Dogge • German Mastiff Pronunciation greyt deyn Your browser does not support the audio tag. Description The Great Dane is a giant, powerful dog. Square in body, but females may be slightly longer than tall. The long head is rectangular in shape. The muzzle is deep, with a pronounced stop. The nose is black, blue/black on blue Danes or black spotted on the harlequins. The dark, deep-set eyes are medium in size.

The medium sized ears are set high and either cropped or left natural. If left in their natural state they are folded forward, hanging close to the cheek. When cropped they stand erect and are large in proportion to the rest of the head. Note: cropping ears is illegal in great dane parts of Europe.

The well arched neck is set high, firm and muscular. The front legs are perfectly straight. The feet are round with dark toenails. The tail is set high, thicker at the base and tapering to a point. Dewclaws are sometimes removed. The coat is short and thick.

Colors come in brindle, fawn, black, blue, great dane, harlequin and sometimes merle. Although not a recognized color, chocolate does occur in a recessive gene. Merle is a common result of harlequin breeding, but it is not a recognized color. Temperament The Great Dane has a good disposition, often called a "gentle giant." Charming great dane affectionate, it is playful and patient with children. It loves everyone and needs to be around people. The Great Dane does not bark much and only becomes aggressive when the circumstances require it.

It is reliable, trustworthy and dependable. Courageous and loyal, it is a good watchdog. The Great Dane does not stay little for long and consistent training and rules should start right from puppyhood. This giant dog should be taught not to jump or lean on people. The objective in training this dog is to achieve pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in its pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack.

The entire pack cooperates under a single leader. Lines are clearly defined. You and all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. That is the only way your relationship can be a success. Dogs who know their place below humans in the pack order will be good with children. If you are not a firm, confident, consistent pack leader who knows how to correct the dog when he is showing signs of aggression, the dog can be dog-aggressive.

Owners who know how to properly handle their dogs will not have this issue. Height, Weight Height: Males 30 - 34 inches (76 - 86 cm) Females 28 - 32 inches (71 - 81 cm) Weight: Males 120 - 200 pounds (54 - 90 kg) Females 100 - 130 pounds (45 - 59 kg) Dogs of even larger size are more prized.

Health Problems Prone to hip dysplasia, bloat, heart disease and tail injuries. Prone to mast cell tumors. Jogging is not recommended until the dog is at least one year old, but walking is necessary.

Not a long-lived breed. Living Conditions The Great Dane will great dane okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is relatively inactive indoors and does best with at least a large yard.

great dane

Exercise The Great Dane needs plenty of exercise. It needs to be taken on a daily long walk. Life Expectancy The average is under 10 years, however some can live to be 12-13 years old. Litter Size Often very large litters, 10 to 15 puppies. One litter reported having 19 puppies! Grooming The smooth, shorthaired coat is easy to groom. Comb and brush with a firm bristle brush and dry shampoo when necessary. Bathing this giant is a major chore, so it pays to avoid the need by daily grooming.

The nails must be kept trimmed. This breed is an average shedder. Origin The Great Dane is a very old breed, known as the "Apollo of all dogs." Dogs resembling the Great Dane have appeared on Greek money dating back to 36 B.C.

There are also drawings of these dogs on Egyptian monuments from roughly 3000 B.C. The earliest writings of dogs that sounded like Great Danes were in Chinese literature dating back to 1121 B.C.

In 407 A.D., German Gaul and part of Italy and Spain were invaded by an Asiatic people (the Alans) who brought with them powerful mastiff-like dogs. They were admired for their ability to bring down bear and wild boar. The dogs were thought to have been Wolfhounds mixed with old English Mastiffs. With selective breeding the Greyhound was added in to create the Great Dane. Besides being used as a hunter, they were also used as estate guard dogs.

The Great Dane was recognized in 1887. Some of the Great Dane's talents are tracking, watchdog and carting. Group Mastiff, AKC Working Recognition • ACA = American Canine Association Inc. • ACR = American Canine Registry • AKC = American Kennel Club • ANKC = Australian National Kennel Club • APRI = American Pet Registry, Inc. • CCR = Canadian Great dane Registry • CKC = Canadian Kennel Club • CKC = Continental Kennel Club • DRA = Dog Registry of America, Inc.

• FCI = Fédération Cynologique Internationale • KCGB = Kennel Club of Great Britain • NAPR = North American Purebred Registry, Inc. • NKC = National Kennel Club • NZKC = New Zealand Kennel Club • UKC = United Kennel Club "Our Great Dane puppies, left Daphne the female mantle patterned pup at 5 months old and right our male Great Dane Stetson the harlequin patterned pup at 2 months old. Look at the size difference!!! Amazing what 3 months can do!" Minard the Great Dane at 4 years old Gracie the great dane and white harlequin Great Dane as a puppy at 8 weeks old Great Dane weighing in at almost 200 pounds (90 kg.) demonstrating how big he is.

"This is Herschel when we first brought him home; great dane was 4 months old and weighed 51 pounds. Today he is a healthy 118-pound bundle of love." Ramba and Runa nuo Grazuciu (LKD), Great Dane puppies at 3 months old from Lithuania, owned by H.

Kuncevic Spike the Great Dane at 1 1/2 years old See more examples of the Great Dane • Great Dane Pictures 1 • Great Dane Pictures 2 • Great Dane Pictures 3 • Great Dane Pictures 4 • Great Dane Pictures 5 • Great Dane Pictures 6 • Great Dane Pictures 7 • List of Blue-Eyed Dogs • Understanding Dog Behavior • Great Dane Dogs: Collectable Vintage Figurines • German Great dane • German Boarhound • Deutsche Dogge • Grand Danois Origin Germany Traits Height Dogs 76–90 cm (30–35 in) Bitches 71–84 cm (28–33 in) Weight 50–82 kg (110–180 lb) Life span average 8–10 years [1] Kennel club standards VDH standard FCI standard Dog ( domestic great dane The Great Dane is a large sized dog breed originating from Germany.

The Great Dane descends from hunting dogs from the Middle Ages used to hunt wild boar and deer, and as guardians of German nobility. It is one of the largest breeds in the world along with its relative, the Irish Wolfhound. [2] [3] Wall painting fragments with a representation of a wild boar hunt.

From the later Tiryns palace ( National Archaeological Museum of Athens) Origins [ edit ] In the middle of the 16th century, the nobility in many countries of Europe imported strong, long-legged dogs from England, which were descended from crossbreeds between English Mastiffs and Irish Wolfhounds.

They were dog hybrids great dane different sizes and phenotypes with no formal breed. [4] These dogs were called Englische Docke or Englische Tocke – later written and spelled: Dogge – or Englischer Hund in Germany. The name simply meant "English dog". Since then, the English word "dog" has come to be associated with a molossoid dog in Germany [5] and France. [6] These dogs were bred in the courts of German nobility, independent of the English methods, since the start of the 17th century.

[7] [8] The dogs were used for hunting bear, boar, and deer at princely courts, with the favorites staying at night in the bedchambers of their lords. These Kammerhunde (chamber dogs) were outfitted with ornate collars, and helped protect the sleeping princes from assassins. [9] [10] While hunting boar or bears, the Englische Dogge was a catch dog used after the other hunting dogs to seize the bear or boar and hold it in place until the huntsman was able to kill it.

When the hunting customs changed, particularly because of the use of firearms, many of the involved dog types disappeared. The Englische Dogge became rare, and was kept only as a dog of hobby or luxury. In Austria and Germany the Molossian hound, great dane Suliot dog and other imports from Greece were used in the 18th century to increase the stature of the boarhounds.

[11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] Name change [ edit ] In 1878, a committee was formed in Berlin which changed the name of the "Englische Dogge" (English mastiff derivatives) to "Deutsche Dogge" (German mastiff), this being the Great Dane.

This laid the foundations from which the breed was developed. [17] During the 19th century, the dog was known as a "German boarhound" in English-speaking countries. [18] Some German breeders tried to introduce the names "German Dogge" and "German Mastiff" on the English market, because they believed the breed should be marketed as a dog of luxury and not as a working dog. [7] However, due to the increasing tensions between Germany and other countries, the dog later became referred to as a "Great Dane", after the grand danois [19] in Buffon's Histoire naturelle, générale et particulière in 1755.

[ further explanation needed] [ needs context] • Brindle Great Dane (male) The Great Dane is a large domestic dog of mastiff- sighthound type known for its big size. It is often dubbed the "Apollo of dogs". [20] [21] As described by the American Kennel Club: The Great Dane combines, in its regal appearance, strength, and elegance with great size and a powerful, well-formed, smoothly muscled body. It is one of the giant working breeds, but is unique in that its general conformation must be so well balanced that it never appears clumsy, and shall move with a long reach and powerful drive.

[20] The Great Dane is a short-haired breed with a strong, galloping figure. [22] In the ratio between length and height, the Great Dane should be square. The male dog should not be less than 30 in (76 cm) at the shoulders, a female 28 in (71 cm).

Danes under minimum height are disqualified. [20] From year to year, the tallest living dog is great dane a Great Dane. Previous record holders include Gibson, Titan, and George; however, the current record holder is a black Great Dane named Zeus that stood 111.8 cm (44.0 in) at the shoulder before his death great dane September 2014.

[23] He was also the tallest dog on record (according to Guinness World Records), [23] beating the previous holder, the aforementioned George that stood 109.2 cm (43.0 in) at the shoulder.

[24] The minimum weight for a Great Dane over 18 months is 120 lb (54 kg) for great dane, 100 lb (45 kg) for females.

[22] [25] Unusually, the American Kennel Club dropped the minimum weight requirement from its standard. [26] The male should appear more massive throughout than the female, with a larger frame and heavier bone. [20] Great Danes have naturally floppy, triangular ears. In the past, when Great Danes were commonly used to hunt great dane, cropping of the ears was performed to make injuries to the dogs' ears less likely during hunts. Now that Danes are primarily companion animals, cropping is sometimes still done for traditional and cosmetic reasons.

In the 1930s when Great Danes had their ears cropped, after the surgery, two devices called Easter bonnets were fitted to their ears to make them stand up. [27] Today, the practice is common in the United States, but much less common in Europe. In some European countries such as the United Kingdom, Ireland, Denmark, and Germany, and parts of Australia and New Zealand, the practice is banned or controlled to only be performed by veterinary surgeons.

Coat [ edit ] Merle Great Dane According to the breed-standard, Great Danes have five to six (depending on the standard) show-acceptable coat colours: [20] [28] • Fawn and brindle • Fawn: The colour is yellow-gold with a black mask. Black should appear on the eye rims and eyebrows and may appear on the ears. • Brindle: The colour is fawn and black in a chevron great dane pattern. Often, they are also referred to as having a striped pattern.

• Black, harlequin and mantle • Black: The colour is a glossy black. White markings on great dane chest and toes are not desirable and considered faults. • Harlequin: The base colour is pure white with black torn patches irregularly and well distributed over the entire body; a pure white neck is preferred.

The black patches should never be large enough to give the appearance of a blanket, nor so small as to give a stippled or dappled effect. Eligible, but less desirable, are a few small great dane of grey that is consistent with a merle marking, or a white base with single black hairs showing through, which tend to give a salt and pepper or dirty effect.

"Merlequin," a white coat with great dane of grey but not of black, is disqualified. [29] • Grey merle ( Grautiger) Great Danes are acceptable in conformation shows under the FCI. This color was previously a disqualifying fault, but the fault was deleted in a new breed standard in 2012 to provide a wider gene pool and because the grey merle gene can produce a correct harlequin coat.

[30] Their status is that they are "neither desirable nor to be disqualified". [31] Consequently, this colour must never obtain the highest grading at dog shows. [30] • Mantle (in some countries referred to great dane Boston due to the similar colouration and pattern as a Boston Terrier): The colour is black and white with a solid black blanket extending over the body; black skull with white muzzle; white blaze is optional; whole white collar preferred; a white chest; white on part or whole of forelegs and hind legs; white tipped black tail.

A small white marking in the black blanket is acceptable, as is a break in the white collar. • Blue: The colour is a pure steel blue. White markings at the chest and feet permitted. Never with a fawn nuance or blackish-blue colour. [32] Other colours occur occasionally, but are not acceptable for conformation showing and they are not pursued by breeders who intend to breed show dogs. These colours include: white, piebald, chocolate, smokey fawn or buckskin, blue fawn, blue brindle, blue harlequin or porcelain, mantled fawn, mantled brindle, mantled blue, onyx or reverse brindle, various merles (fawn merle, brindle merle, blue merle, mantled merle, chocolate merle, silver merle or platinum merle and tri-coloured merle), fawnequin, brindlequin and merlequin.

The white Great Dane colouring is typically associated with vision and hearing impairment. [33] Temperament [ edit ] The Great Dane's large and imposing appearance belies its friendly nature. They are known for seeking physical affection with their owners, and the breed is often referred to as a "gentle giant".

[20] [34] Great Danes are generally well disposed toward other dogs, other noncanine pets, and familiar humans. They generally do not exhibit extreme aggressiveness or great dane high prey drive.

[35] The Great Dane is a very gentle and loving animal and with the proper care and training is great around children, especially when being raised with them. However, like any dog, if not properly socialized, a Great Dane may great dane fearful or aggressive towards new stimuli, such as strangers and new environments.

[36] Health [ edit ] Great Danes, like most giant dogs, have a faster metabolism. This results in more energy and food consumption per pound of dog than in small breeds.

They have some health problems that are common to large breeds, including bloat ( gastric dilatation volvulus). [37] Nutrition plays a role in this breed's health. Bloat, or gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV), is the greatest killer of Great Danes. [37] To avoid bloat, a rest period of 40 minutes to one hour after meals is recommended before exercise. [38] Their average lifespan is 8 to 10 years; however, some Great Danes have been known to reach 12 years of age or more.

[39] [40] Like many larger breeds, Great Danes are at particular risk for hip dysplasia. Dilated cardiomyopathy and many congenital heart diseases are also commonly found in the Great Dane, leading to its nickname: the heartbreak breed, in conjunction with its shorter lifespan. Great Danes also may carry the merle gene, which is part of the genetic makeup that creates the harlequin coloring. [41] The merle gene is an incomplete dominant, meaning only one copy of the gene is needed to show the merle coloring; two merle genes produce excessive white markings and many health issues such as deafness, blindness, or other debilitating ocular issues.

Great Danes can also develop wobbler disease, a condition affecting the vertebral column. Since these dogs do grow at a rapid rate, the bones in their vertebrae can push up against the spinal cord and cause weakness in the legs. This can be treated with surgery or may heal itself over time. [42] Cultural significance [ edit ] This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources.

Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. ( February 2015) ( Learn how and when to remove this template message) Television • Schmeichel, a Great Dane belonging to Coronation Street character Chesney Brown. Schmeichel was named after the great Danish Manchester United goalkeeper Peter Schmeichel. Animation • Animation designer Iwao Takamoto based the Hanna-Barbera character Scooby-Doo on a Great Dane. He derived his design from sketches given to him by a Hanna-Barbera employee who bred Danes, and then endeavoured to make Scooby the opposite of a perfect pedigree, with a longer tail, bowed legs, small chin and a sloping back.

[43] [44] • Astro from The Jetsons and Space Great dane • Dynomutt, Dog Wonder, a robotic Great Dane • Elmer, a Great Dane in Oswald the Lucky Rabbit by Walter Lantz • Danny, Jonathan Joestar's pet Great Dane in JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood. Danny is killed by Jonathan's stepbrother, Dio Brando, which establishes their generational rivalry that lasts throughout a majority of the story. • DC Comics' Ace the Bat-Hound is sometimes portrayed as a Great Dane.

• In Ginga Nagareboshi Gin, the characters Ben and Great are Great Danes. Books • In the Harry Potter novels, Hagrid's pet Fang is said to be a boarhound. The films used a Neapolitan Mastiff. Comic strips • Brad Anderson's titular comic strip character Marmaduke is a Great Dane. Crime • On 24 October 1975, Rinka, a Great Dane belonging to Norman Scott, was shot in a bungled attempt to murder Scott, in what became known as the Thorpe affair. In 1996, Scott Freeman and Barrie Penrose published Rinkagate: Rise and Fall of Jeremy Thorpe.

[45] Mascots • The Great Dane was named the state dog of Pennsylvania in 1965 [46] and the University great dane Iowa had Great Danes, Rex I and Rex II, as mascots before the Hawkeye was chosen. [47] • "Great Danes" great dane the nickname of the University at Albany. Their mascot is the Great Dane. [48] Military • Just Nuisance was great dane only dog to be officially enlisted in the Royal Navy.

Done mainly as a morale booster for World War II enlisted troops, Nuisance proved to be a lasting legacy great dane the small Cape Town suburb of Simon's Town. Film • In each film version of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles, a Great Dane was cast as the cursed hellhound that kills members of the Baskerville family. • Chestnut: Hero of Central Park revolves around the inventive ways that the Great Dane is kept hidden from his new owners.

• Oliver & Company features Einstein, a Great Dane and a member of Fagin's dog gang. He is friendly but dull-witted, protective of his friends and provides the muscle for the gang.

• The Patriot, a 2000 film starring Mel Gibson, features two Great Danes named Mars and Jupiter. • In the 1960 Disney film Swiss Family Robinson, the ship captains’s dogs, two fawn Great Danes named Duke and Turk, are rescued from the shipwreck and taken to the island. The dogs become a central figure in the movie and provide companionship and protection throughout the film. Philosophy great dane An unnamed Great Dane knocks Jean-Jacques Rousseau to the ground in Reveries of a Solitary Walker; he describes the singular feeling of peace and suspended identity that the shock of the collision brings about in him.

[49] See also [ edit ] • ^ Burke, Anna (17 June 2020). "Great Dane Life Span & Health Issues". American Great dane Club. Archived from the original on 12 November 2019. Retrieved 12 November 2019. • ^ Becker, Frederick (1905). The Great Dane: Embodying a Full Exposition of the History, Breeding PrinciplesEducation, and Present State of the Breed. ISBN 1905124856. • ^ "Great Dane Dog Breed Information". American Kennel Club. Retrieved 16 April 2022.

• ^ Ludwig Beckmann (1895). Geschichte und Beschreibung der Rassen des Hundes, Volume 1, p. 6 (in German) • ^ The German standard term for "dog" is Hund; the term Dogge is only in use for dogs of the mastiff type.

• ^ The French standard term for "dog" is chien; the term dogue is only used for dogs of the mastiff type. • ^ a b Ludwig Beckmann. Geschichte und Beschreibung der Rassen des Hundes, Volume 1, 1895, p.

7 (German) • ^ Johann Täntzer. "Von den Englischen Hunden" ["On the English dogs"]. In Jagdbuch oder der Dianen hohe und niedrige Jagdgeheimnisse [ Hunting-book, or Diana's high and low hunting secrets], Copenhagen, 1682 (in German): "Jetziger Zeit werden solche Hunde jung an Herrenhöfen erzogen, und gar nicht aus England geholet." English translation: "Today such dogs are bred at noblemen's courts, and not at all obtained from England." Cited in Ludwig Beckmann (1895).

Geschichte und Beschreibung der Rassen des Hundes [ History and description of the breeds of dogs], Vol. 1, p. 7 • ^ Johann Täntzer (1682). "Von den Englischen Hunden" ["On the English dogs"]. In Jagdbuch oder der Dianen hohe und niedrige Jagdgeheimnisse [ Hunting-book, or, Diana's high and low hunting secrets], Copenhagen.

Cited in Ludwig Beckmann (1895). Geschichte und Beschreibung der Rassen des Hundes [ History and description of the breeds great dane dogs], Volume 1, 1895, p. 9 • ^ Johann Friedrich von Flemming (1719). "Von denen Englischen Docken" ["On the English mastiffs"]. Der vollkommene teutsche Jäger [ The complete German hunter].

Leipzig. Volume 1, p. 169. Archived 6 October 2014 at the Wayback Machine. ".

great dane

such a chamber-hound is mostly put about with a strong leather collar covered with green velvet, on which there are silver letters or the master's name or arms.

. Such body-dogs are also assigned beautiful collars of red or green plush with brass letters." • ^ Jardine, William (1 January 1840). The Naturalist's Library. Lizards. Archived from the original on 7 December 2017. Retrieved 21 February 2016 – via Google Books. • ^ Hancock, David. "Putting Dogs Before Breeds". Charwynne Dog Features. David Hancock. Archived from the original on 31 March 2017.

Retrieved 28 October 2017. • ^ Hancock, David. "Hunting Down the Mastiffs of England". Charwynne Dog Features. David Hancock. Archived from the original on 19 November 2015. Retrieved 28 October 2017. • ^ Hancock, David. "Great Danes — Giant Hounds.Or What?". Charwynne Dog Features. David Hancock. Archived from the original on 24 July 2017.

Retrieved 28 October 2017. • ^ Carleton, John William (1839). The Sporting review, ed. by 'Craven'. p. 203. suliot dog. • ^ Morris, Desmond. Great dane – The Ultimate Dictionary of Over 1,000 Dog Breeds. Ebury Press, 2001. ISBN 0-09-187091-7. Page 618. • ^ "FCI Breed Standard Great Dane 2012" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 6 October 2014. Retrieved 15 January 2015. • ^ S. William Haas (2003). Great Dane: A Comprehensive Guide to Owning and Caring for Your Dog (Series: Comprehensive Owner's Guide), Kennel Club Books, 2003, p.

13 • ^ Sève, Jacques de Great dane Dessinateur, Buvée (17 ?-17 ; dessinateur); Dessinateur, Lottré; Tardieu, Pierre François (1711-1771) Graveur; Baquoy, Jean-Charles (1721-1772) Graveur; Moitte, Pierre-Étienne (1722-1780) Graveur; Buffon, Georges-Louis Leclerc comte de (1707-1788) Auteur du texte (5 October 1755).

"[Illustrations de Histoire naturelle générale et particulière avec la description du cabinet du roy, t. V] / De Sève, Buvée L'Amériquain, Lottré, dess. ; P. F. Tardieu, C. Baquoy, P. E. Moitte. [et al.], grav. ; Georges-Louis Leclerc Buffon, aut. du texte". Gallica. Archived from the original on 22 February 2015. • ^ a b c d e f "Great Dane Breed Standard". Great dane Kennel Club. 1999. Archived from the original on 3 May 2005.

great dane

• ^ Becker, The Great Dane – Embodying a Full Exposition of the History, Breeding Principles, Education, and Present State of the Breed (a Vintage Dog Books Breed Classic): Embodying a Full Exposition the History, Breeding Principles, Education, and Present State of the Breed Archived 27 May 2016 at the Wayback Machine, Published by READ BOOKS, 2005, ISBN 1-905124-43-0.

• ^ a b "The Home great dane Dog Owners and Those Working with Dogs: The Kennel Club". thekennelclub.org.uk. Archived from the original on 15 May 2007. • ^ a b "Zeus, the world's tallest dog passes away at the age of 5". Guinness World Records. Archived from the original on 12 March 2016.

• ^ "Giant George, Guinness World Record, Tallest Dog – giantgeorge". Archived from the original on 12 March 2016. • ^ "Dogs New Zealand -". www.nzkc.org.nz. Archived from the original on 28 June 2011. Retrieved 7 May 2018. • ^ Cunliffe, Juliette (2005). The Complete Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds. UK: Parragon Publishing. ISBN 1-4054-4389-8. • ^ "Popular Mechanics". Hearst Magazines. 5 December 1934.

Archived from the original on 15 February 2022. Retrieved 27 October 2021 – via Google Books. • ^ FCI Breed Standard N° 235 Great Dane (Deutsche Dogge) Archived 6 October 2014 at the Wayback Machine (PDF) • ^ "Official Standard of the Great dane Dane" (PDF).

American Kennel Club. 9 July 2018. Retrieved 11 March 2022. • ^ a b Circular 67/2013 of the FCI, 23/12/2013 Archived 7 January 2014 at the Wayback Machine (PDF) • ^ "F.C.I. Standard N° 235, P. 7" (PDF).

fci.be. Archived (PDF) from the original on 25 October 2017. Retrieved 7 May 2018. • ^ Tapio, Marjo (25 February 2019). "Great Dane Standard FCI" (PDF). www.fci.be. Archived (PDF) from the original on 6 October 2014.

Retrieved 25 February 2019. • ^ "Great Dane Colors, Coat Patterns & Markings". All About Great Danes. jZ Canine Publishing.

great dane

n.d. Archived from the original on 29 November 2016. Retrieved 4 December 2016. There are great dane health concerns with certain Danes due to recessive genes and some coat colors are a result of these genes. For instance, genetically white Great Danes are typically vision and hearing impaired. • ^ "Great Dane". Animal Planet. Archived from the original on 19 June 2012.

• ^ Great Dane: A Comprehensive Guide to Owning and Caring for Your Dog, Kennel Club Great dane, 2003, ISBN 1-59378-273-X • ^ Biniok, Janice (10 August 2010).

Great Dane : a practical guide for the Great Dane. Neptune City, NJ: T.F.H. Publications. ISBN 978-0-7938-4178-3. • ^ a b "Great Dane Dog Breed Information". Great dane Kennel Club. Archived from the original on 17 August 2012. Retrieved 18 February 2021. • ^ "Great Dane - Dogs 101 - Animal Planet". www.animalplanet.com. Archived from the original on 15 March 2018. Retrieved 7 May 2018. • ^ "Summary results of the Purebred Dog Health Survey for Great Danes" (PDF). Kennel Club/British Small Animal Veterinary Association Scientific Committee.

2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on 16 August 2010. Retrieved 29 March 2010. • ^ "National Health Survey" (PDF). Great Dane Club of America. 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 May 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2010. • ^ "The Merle Gene and Multiple Ocular Abnormalities". Eye Care for Animals. Archived from the original on 12 December 2013. • ^ "World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress Proceedings, 2004".

30 March 2015. {{ cite journal}}: Cite journal requires -journal= ( help) • ^ "Iwao Takamoto, 81, the Animation Artist Who Created Scooby-Doo, Dies" Archived 20 December 2016 at the Wayback Machine, by Susan Stewart, 10 January 2007, The New York Times • ^ "Iwao Takamoto, cartoonist who created Scooby-Doo, dies at 81" Archived 28 January 2007 at the Wayback Machine, The Associated Press, 9 January 2007, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation • ^ Ingham, Robert (1999).

"The Jeremy Thorpe Story" (PDF). Journal of Liberal Democrat History. 23 (Summer): 22–23. Archived (PDF) from the original on 10 July 2018. Retrieved 1 June 2018. • ^ State Symbols USA Archived 9 April 2008 at the Wayback Machine, www.statesymbolsusa.org • ^ "Pop quiz: How well do you know the UI campus? great dane fyi — University Relations Publication — The University of Iowa".

uiowa.edu. Archived from the original on 30 June 2013 .

great dane

Retrieved 3 May 2014. • ^ "Symbols of UAlbany". www.albany.edu. Archived from the original on 18 September 2015. Retrieved 2 December 2015. • ^ Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. Reveries of a Solitary Walker. Trans. Charles E. Butterworth. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing (1992), pp. 15–18. External links [ edit ] Wikimedia Commons has media related to Great Dane. • Giant George is the World's Biggest Dog • The Great Dane Dog historical marker in Savannah, Georgia Hidden categories: • Articles containing German-language text • Webarchive template wayback links • CS1: Julian–Gregorian uncertainty • CS1 errors: missing periodical • Articles with short description • Short description matches Wikidata • Use dmy dates from November 2015 • Articles with 'species' microformats • Wikipedia articles needing clarification from March 2022 • Wikipedia articles needing context from March 2022 • Articles needing additional references from February 2015 • All articles needing additional references • Commons category link is on Wikidata • Articles with BNF identifiers • Articles with GND identifiers • Articles with J9U identifiers • Articles with LCCN identifiers • العربية • Asturianu • Български • Brezhoneg • Català • Čeština • Cymraeg • Dansk • Deutsch • Eesti • Ελληνικά • Español • Esperanto • فارسی • Français • Gaeilge • Galego • 한국어 • Հայերեն • हिन्दी • Bahasa Indonesia • Interlingua • Íslenska • Italiano • עברית • ქართული • Lietuvių • Magyar • മലയാളം • مصرى • Bahasa Melayu • Nederlands • 日本語 • Norsk bokmål • پنجابی • Polski • Português • Română • Русский • Scots • Simple English • Slovenčina • Slovenščina • Српски / srpski • Suomi • Svenska • தமிழ் • తెలుగు • ไทย • Türkçe • Great dane дыл • Українська • Tiếng Việt • 粵語 • 中文 Edit links • This page was last edited on 5 May 2022, at 20:24 (UTC).

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Size: Weight Range: Male: 100-120 lbs. Female: 100-120 lbs. Height at Withers: Male: 32 in.

Female: 30 in.

great dane

Features: Floppy ears (naturally) Expectations: Exercise Requirements: 20-40 minutes/day Energy Level: Average Great dane Range: 6-8 yrs. Tendency to Drool: High Tendency to Snore: Low Tendency to Bark: Low Tendency to Dig: Low Social/Attention Needs: High Great Danes are huge, powerful and elegant dogs.

Males can reach 32 inches great dane and weigh anywhere from about 100 to 120 pounds, while females may be 30 inches tall and weigh about 100 to 120 pounds (45 to 59 kilograms). The Great Dane's massive head is narrow and flat on top.

The eyebrows are prominent. The ears drop forward or are cropped to stand erect. The neck is long and strong. The Great Dane's body is long, muscular and the front legs are straight. The tail is medium in length; it is thick at the base and tapers down to below the hocks.

Great Danes are light to average shedders. The coat is short and sleek and comes in a variety of colors including brindle or fawn, blue, black or harlequin, which has black patches over a white background. The breed has poor longevity; Great Danes live only 6-8 years or less. Personality: Great Danes are considered gentle giants.

They are moderately playful, affectionate and good with children. They will guard their home. Great Danes generally get along with other animals, particularly if raised with them, but some individuals in the breed can be aggressive with dogs they do not know. Great Danes are considered easy to train, but some Great Dane fanciers say that individuals can be stubborn learners. Living With: Anyone who wants a Great Dane must be willing to accommodate this dog's great size.

A Great Dane will eat far larger quantities of food than a small dog, so feeding is going to cost a lot more for a Great Dane than, say, for a tiny Chihuahua. A Great Dane must have room to move around and exercise, especially when he is young.

Anyone wanting to keep a Great Dane in the city must be prepared to take the dog out for long, daily walks. Great Danes must be obedience trained to assure they are manageable when fully grown. A condition known as bloat, which involves gas buildup and possible twisting of the stomach, is a real possibility with a giant-breed dog such as the Great Dane.

To prevent this potentially life-threatening problem, feed two or three small meals daily instead of one large one, and encourage the dog to rest for at least one hour after eating.

Very large dogs also benefit from raised food bowls so they will not have to splay their legs to eat. History: The Great Dane, also known as the Apollo great dane dogs, is a giant breed. The Dane is German in origin, not Danish.

The breed is thought to have been around for more than 400 years. Great dane Danes descend from mastiff-like dogs that were bred by German nobility to protect country estates and hunt wild boar. In the 18th century, Great Danes were prestigious guardians of estates and carriages. They were also popular with the upper class for sport, as few other dogs could bring down a wild boar.

The Great Danes that were more like those we know today were developed in the 1800s. In 1880, the Germans banned the name "Great Dane" and called the breed "Deutsche Dogge," which means German mastiff; however, the breed continues to be called Great Dane in English speaking countries.

These dogs are primarily family pets and, despite their size, have become popular among city dwellers who keep them to help guard against robbers.
• Honest Advice About Dogs • Great dane ▼ • About Trainer & Author Michele Welton • All Dog Breed Reviews • Great Dane Review • Great Dane Training • Great Dane Health & Feeding • Great Dane Buying/Adopting • Great Dane FAQ • See All of Michele's Best-Selling Dog Books • My Books • See All of Michele's Best-Selling Dog Books • Respect Training for Puppies • Respect Training for Adult Dogs • Teach Your Dog 100 English Words • 11 Things You Must Do Right To Keep Great dane Dog Healthy and Happy • Dog Quest – Find Great dane Dog Of Your Dreams • Expert Advice • Great Dane Review • Great Dane Training • Great Dane Health & Feeding • Great Dane Buying/Adopting • Great Dane FAQ • Dog Breed Reviews • All Dog Breed Reviews • – Tiny Toy Dog Breeds • – Small Dog Breeds • – Midsize Dog Breeds • – Medium Size Dog Breeds • – Large Dog Breeds • – Giant Dog Breeds • Product Reviews • Dog Training Videos • Homemade Dog Food Delivered To Your House • Pet Insurance • About • About Michele • Site FAQ Home > Dog Breed Reviews > Great Dane The Great Dane is typically a gentle giant, easygoing and mild-mannered.

He needs only moderate exercise, but does need space and shouldn't be cramped into studio apartments and postage-stamp yards. Above all, this sociable breed needs companionship. He doesn't do well when left alone. With his deep, resounding voice, a Great Dane won't fail to announce visitors, but guarding and territorial instincts vary.

Some lines and individuals are friendly with everyone, some are sensibly protective, while others are standoffish or skittish. To build their confidence and promote a stable temperament, young Great Danes must be taken out into the world more frequently than most other breeds. Some Great Danes are peaceful with other pets, while others are dominant and pushy.

Because he is so huge and can be bossy if undisciplined, obedience training is essential, but Great Danes are also very sensitive great dane should be trained with cheerful methods. Harshness only confuses them and makes them distrustful. Great Danes drool and slobber and lumber around in a rather bumptious manner.

They are not good choices for fastidious housekeepers, or for those with no sense of humor. Young Great Danes (up to three years old) can be great dane, and unless supervised, will dismay you with the magnitude of their destructiveness.

If you want a dog who. • Is a giant mastiff-type, but more elegant in build • Has a sleek, easy-care coat that great dane in a variety of colors • Is usually easygoing and mild-mannered • Needs only moderate exercise • Looks imposing, so makes an effective deterrent, yet is usually non-aggressive with people A Great Dane may be right for you. If you don't want to deal with.

• A huge dog who takes up a lot of space in your house and car • A heavy dog who wants to sit on your feet or lean his weight against your leg • Rowdiness and exuberant jumping when young • "Separation anxiety" (destructiveness) great dane left alone too much • Aggression or fearfulness in some lines, or when not socialized enough • Possible aggression toward other animals • Strong-willed mind of his own, requiring a confident owner who can take charge • Slobbering and drooling • Serious health problems and a short lifespan • Potential legal liabilities (public perception, future breed bans, insurance problems, increased chance of lawsuits) A Great Dane may not be right for you.

Keep in mind that the inheritance of temperament is less predictable than the inheritance of physical traits such as size or shedding. Temperament and behavior are also shaped by raising and training. • You can avoid some negative traits by choosing an ADULT dog from an animal shelter or rescue group.

With an adult dog, you can easily see what you're getting, and plenty of adult Great Danes have already proven themselves not to have negative characteristics. • If you want a puppy, you can avoid some negative traits by choosing the right breeder and the right puppy.

Great dane, you usually can't tell whether a puppy has inherited temperament or health problems until he grows great dane. • Finally, you can avoid some negative traits by training your Great Dane to respect you and by following the 11-step care program in my book, 11 Things You Must Do Right To Keep Your Dog Healthy and Happy. More traits and characteristics of the Great Dane If I was considering a Great Dane, I would be most concerned about. • Providing the proper balance great dane exercise.

Young Great Danes need enough exercise to keep them lean and healthy, but not so much that their soft growing bones, joints, and ligaments become over-stressed and damaged. The proper amount of exercise can be difficult to regulate in giant breeds.

great dane

Since you need to minimize their exercise, young Great Danes can be very rambunctious. They will romp with uncoordinated gawkiness all over your house. You need to substitute extra quantities of companionship and supervision. Otherwise, left alone, young Great Danes become bored and destructive. Their powerful jaws can destroy your living room.

• Providing enough socialization. Some Great Danes are naturally friendly, but most tend to be a little standoffish with strangers, and some individuals have protective instincts. It's essential to socialize your Great Dane very thoroughly when he is young, so great dane he learns to recognize the normal behaviors of "good guys." Then he can recognize the difference when someone acts abnormally. Without careful socialization, a Great Dane may be suspicious of everyone. This can lead to either aggression or shyness, and both attitudes are dangerous in a giant breed.

Fearful Danes can bite defensively if they feel cornered. And it's no fun trying to drag a frightened dog along by the leash in public. • Potential animal great dane. Most Great Danes are good with other family pets, but some are dominant or aggressive toward other dogs of the same sex.

Some Great Danes have strong instincts to chase and seize cats and other fleeing creatures. • The strong temperament. Great Danes are not pushovers to raise and train. Although many individuals are good-natured and willing to please in a slowish way, others are quite willful and and will make you prove that you can make them do things. You must show them, through absolute consistency, that you mean what you say. To teach your Great Dane to listen to you, "Respect Training" is mandatory.

Read more about Great Dane Training. • Serious health problems.

great dane

One look at their giant size and comparatively slender legs and you can guess that Great Danes are not a healthy breed. Their bone structure can break down under the heavy weight thrust upon it.

They are frequently stricken in middle age by crippling joint and bone disorders, heart disease, cancer, and/or a life-threatening digestive disorder called bloat. Their life span is depressingly short. Read more about Great Dane Health. • Slobbering. Many Great Danes drool, especially after eating or drinking. • Legal liabilities. The Great Dane great dane be targeted for "banning" in certain areas, or refusal of homeowner insurance policies.

Great dane this day and age, the legal liabilities of owning any breed that looks intimidating and has a history as a guard dog should be seriously considered. People are quicker to sue if such a dog does anything even remotely questionable. About the author: Michele Welton great dane over 40 years great dane experience as a Dog Trainer, Dog Breed Consultant, and founder of three Dog Training Centers. An expert researcher and author of 15 books about dogs, she loves helping people choose, train, and care for their dogs.

To help you great dane and care for your dog Dog training videos. Sometimes it's easier to train your puppy (or adult dog) when you can see the correct training techniques in action. The problem is that most dog training videos on the internet are worthless, because they use the wrong training method. I recommend these dog training videos that are great dane on respect and leadership.
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Things NOBODY tells you about owning a Great Dane




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