The best is yet to be sekolah

the best is yet to be sekolah

A young man applying for a job was asked by the personnel director, "How old are you?" He replied, "Twenty-seven." He was then asked by the director, "And what do you expect to be in three years?" With all seriousness of thought he said, "Thirty." Some people are Iike this young man, without any expectations.

They drift along in life not knowing where they are going or whether it is possible to have any personal determination over their lives. Some even think that after a certain age life is a downhill journey. They think that the early years held the great opportunities of life and, since they the best is yet to be sekolah not take advantage of them, it is now too late.

They believe the best things in life come early if they come at all. You might stop right now and ask yourself: What are my expectations? What do you expect to give to life, and what do you expect life to return to you? Do you feel that the best years of your life are behind you? Do you think that the greatest and most enjoyable and rewarding experiences have already taken place?

If you have thought this way or think this way now, take heart, for the truth is that, no matter how good life may have been to you already, no matter how great certain experiences have been, the best is yet to be! It may seem impossible to surpass some of the things you have experienced, but this is not so. John Oxenham wrote a little verse that is very appropriate: To every man there openeth a high way and a low/And every man decideth the way his soul shall go.

The power of decision is yours. Your life, here and now, can be a hundred times better than the best you have already experienced. That may seem an overstatement, but even that is conservative. If you want to improve your life, now is the time to begin. Do the odds seem to be against you? That makes no difference. Does your situation seem hopeless?

It is not. The first step you must take is on the inner level. You must realize and believe that you have the power to determine what you will experience. You do not have to leave your life to chance. You can plan for the good you desire. You do not have to remain sick, inefficient, poor, miserable, or in bondage.

You do not have to fight the world and give in to fits of depression and discouragement. You have probably heard the words of Henley many times: It matters not how strait the gate,/How charged with punishments the scroll,/I am the master of my fate;/I am the best is yet to be sekolah Captain of my soul.

You are the captain, but have you acted with the authority of a captain, or have you let other people and events control your life? You have reserves of power and ability that far exceed your present comprehension; however, you must know it in order to use it. You must believe in this power if it is to do you any good.

What good would a million dollars in your name in the bank be to you if you did not know it was there? When you know your potential, you can use it. It makes no difference who you are or what your present age and circumstances may be. It is never too late except for those who think it is.

A winner never thinks it is too late.

the best is yet to be sekolah

If he did, he would in that instant become a loser. All that is necessary is for you to know that within you is the potential to accomplish anything you set the best is yet to be sekolah mind to accomplish. Even the most impossible ailment can be healed if we believe it can be. Many have come back from the dregs of poverty to financial independence. If there is one thing we need today, it is men and women with the courage to think big and to expect big things to happen.

There are needs that urgently demand fulfillment. . Much has been written about how powerful the mind is and how much can be accomplished. There has been more writing than doing. We now need doers, winners. In times of great challenge, men and women who will the best is yet to be sekolah channels for ideas come to the forefront. There will be new discoveries in cleansing our environment and new methods of personal mobility.

We were not created to live and move in masses like schools of fish. We are individuals and should have individual freedom of expression.

In times of crisis it is easy to get more involved in semantic arguments about the problems than in believing there are solutions.

By this I mean we can get more "problem" conscious than "solution" conscious. A winner does not think in terms of problems, he thinks in terms of solutions. He does not argue over what is wrong and fret about the difficulties, he keeps his vision high and his expectations optimistic.

Sure, he has his battles with negative thoughts and emotions, but he meets these with determination. He refuses to let negative thinking get and keep him down. In fact, this tendency often urges him on with even greater determination. Our minds must be free of the shackles of limited thought if we are to accomplish the great things that are possible. If you want to begin to receive and enjoy the best that is yet to be, you must think and expect greater things for yourself and your life.

Cease complaining about your present lot; you can change it with God's help. Cease complaining about others holding you back; no one but yourself can hold you back. Vision leads to accomplishment, and our vision should always be far ahead of our present, developed ability. Work to the best of your ability where you are, and keep your sights high. This is the way to move up in life.

Your expectations are the visions of what you one day will be. You can never ask for nor expect too much, but your asking should not be simply to have but to be, for being leads to having. Your asking should be sincere, your faith strong, and your determination to achieve persistent. When the way before you seems uncertain, when you have those moments of doubt, turn within to God and let Him renew a right spirit of joyous expectation within you. If you look down, you will go down; but if you will look up, things will change, and you will realize more fully how true it is that the best is yet to be!

the best is yet to be sekolah

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adults 55 and older said they were out of the labor force due to retirement, according to the Pew Research Center.

Most of us, at that time in our lives, choose to take a long-awaited vacation or other fun diversion at the end of work careers. Recently retiring, local couple Kathy and Keith Roos of Alpharetta decided very differently and postponed a life of leisure to serve a mission for their church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

According to Church headquarters, currently over 20,000 such Senior Missionaries are helping people around the world feel the love of God through their service. "They assist in mission offices, bishops' storehouses, distribution centers, FamilySearch centers and libraries, self-reliance programs, BYU–Pathway, employment centers and many other places." More Information Here As it turns out, serving a Senior Mission is not so much easing into retirement as it is accepting a new position with significant responsibilities.

It's a time consuming job that pays nothing and must be self-financed, but the choice works for these couples because service is literally part of their Christian belief system. The newly-minted Missionaries from Georgia were asked to work with the young single adult group (YSA) of the Newcastle-Under-Lyme Stake (diocese) of the England Manchester Mission. Kathy remarked, "We had previously served as lay-ministers with a group of 18-30 year old single adults in Georgia and loved the experience.

We are able to take that experience and use it to help the youth of England. We teach two Institute classes [providing religious education for the best is yet to be sekolah adults ages 18 to 30] each week. Our primary efforts are to support the young people in this area.

A great deal of time is spent reaching out to them and supporting them. We hope that these actions show that they are loved." Keith added, "With the young adults we have found the adage: 'feed them and they will come' is true so we spend some time cooking. Kathy's snicker-doodle has been well received and has been tagged as 'the american cookie'. We provide a meal before the weekly institute class. Additionally, we prepare food for the Mission's various conferences and meetings." The couple are also called upon to give spiritual talks to various local congregations.

While they are in their new environment, the Senior Missionaries also take an active role in supporting local residents in any way possible.

Keith explained, "We look for opportunities to serve in the community. For example, Kathy has been teaching a Family History class at the city Library." (Younger Missionaries for the Church are also required to devote several hours a week providing service world-wide in the community where they are living, underlining the Church's ecclesiastical principle of service to others.) The decision to take this direction in retirement came easily to the North Fulton couple who has served in their own community for many years.

"We felt that we've been blessed so much in our lives that we wanted to show our gratitude by serving others. The Senior Missionary Program functions in a number of different areas and we are able to serve where our talents best match the needs," Keith explained, "Senior couples get a say in what they will be doing on their mission and where they will serve. We can't imagine a better example for our grandchildren than to show them how important the Gospel is in our lives and how important it is to serve others.

This is something that we have planned to do our entire married life. An added benefit is that it gives us an opportunity to live in and understand another culture." When asked about challenges, the long-time Georgia residents reported that being without family for the year-and-a-half of their mission was the most difficult aspect.

However, they are allowed to call and Skype and family members can visit them while they are serving their Mission. "The experience is not exactly what we thought it would be.

We could have packed better for the weather, and 'language' classes would have been helpful", the Missionaries reported. "We have to be careful in how things are phrased, because it might mean something else here. Kathy complimented some ladies for their work in cleaning a local park by saying 'thanks for your community service'. The ladies were insulted because the best is yet to be sekolah in England 'community service' is a penalty imposed on prisoners.

We apologized and left by saying 'thanks, the park looks beautiful,'" Keith commented. The rules of replying: • Be respectful. This is a space for friendly local discussions. No racist, discriminatory, vulgar or threatening language will be tolerated. • Be transparent. Use your real name, and back up your claims.

• Keep it local and relevant. Make sure your replies stay on topic. • Review the Patch Community Guidelines. Latest News Nearby • Alpharetta-Milton, GA News 5 New Homes For Sale In The Alpharetta-Milton Area • Across Georgia, GA News GA Good News: Planet Fitness Free For Teens, Nauti Dog Grill Opens • Cumming, GA News GA Dream Homes: Double Ovens, Wrap-Around Deck, Equestrian Estate • Marietta, GA News Freight, Checkers, Sushinobo, Poke Rock Among GA Restaurants Cited • Alpharetta-Milton, GA News Ga.

400 Northbound Lanes Set To Close This Weekend For Construction
none Dear Sekolah Harapan Bangsa Family, Happy New Year 2022! Time flies really fast…. It has been almost 2 years that we are in a pandemic situation. Lots of plans and goals from previous years’ resolutions that might have failed to achieve since the Covid-19 pandemic hit. Yet, it’s not the end of the road. New year means 365 new blanks of paper, ready to be filled with new ideas, plans, and goals. It is the time when everyone thinks about New Year’s resolutions and how they can have a fresh start.

2022 surely is a great time to start over and begin anew. How will you plan your 2022? What are your goals? Here are some practical ways to write down your 2022 resolutions: • Your goals should be smart — and SMART. That’s an acronym for specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound.

Specific: Your goal should be clear and specific, otherwise you won’t be able to focus your efforts or feel truly motivated to achieve it. When drafting your goal, try to answer the five “W” questions. Measurable: Your goal must have criteria or indicator for measuring progress. Be sure to make portfolios, write the progress on your journal or take pictures, so you can track your progress. Achievable: Your goal needs to be realistic and attainable to be successful. It may stretch your abilities but still remain possible.

the best is yet to be sekolah

Try to identify previously overlooked opportunities or resources that can bring you closer to it. Relevant: Your goal must be realistic, so that the goal can be realistically achieved given the available resources and time. Time-bound: Your goal must have a start and finish date. Having a target date will keep you focus and stay motivated in pursuing them. • Write them big As you walk through 2022, the days, weeks, months may have you waving away from goals. Writing down your goals in a place you see them all the time will serve as a useful reminder.

• Celebrate Celebrate every small bit of progress you make in achieving the goal. Appreciate and applause yourself. Every small progress does matter. Focus on these small wins so you can make gradual progress. Ready to write down your 2022 resolutions?

With the New Year comes hope and a promise. And yes, the best is yet to come Resources: https://corporatefinanceinstitute.com/resources/knowledge/other/smart-goal/ https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/smart-goals.htm Febryca. P. English Teacher SHB Primary Modernhill SEKOLAH HARAPAN BANGSA MODERNLAND ___________________________ Jl. Pulau Putri Raya No.Kav 10, Klp. Indah, Kec. Tangerang, Kota Tangerang, Banten 15117 Telp: (62-21) 5529510/11 Fax: (62-21) 5529512 ___________________________ Jl.

Hartono Raya ,Modernland – Tangerang 15117 Telp. (62-21) 55780936 Fax (62-21) 55780938
The start of a new year is the traditional time to take stock of our lives and see where we are going, measured against the backdrop of where we have been.

I don’t want to talk about New Year’s resolutions, but I do want to talk about the past and the future, with an eye toward any time of transition and change in our lives—and those moments come virtually every day. As a scriptural theme for this discussion, I have chosen Luke 17:32, where the Savior cautions, “Remember Lot’s wife.” What did He mean by such an enigmatic little phrase?

To find out, we need to do as He suggested. Let’s recall who Lot’s wife was. The story, of course, comes to us out of the days of Sodom and Gomorrah, when the Lord, having had as much as He could stand of the worst that men and women could do, told Lot and his family to flee because those cities were about to be destroyed. “Escape for thy life,” the Lord said.

“ Look not behind thee … ; escape to the mountain, lest thou be consumed” the best is yet to be sekolah Genesis 19:17; emphasis the best is yet to be sekolah. With less than immediate obedience and more than a little negotiation, Lot and his family ultimately did leave town but just in the nick of time. The scriptures tell us what happened at daybreak the morning following their escape: “The Lord rained upon Sodom and upon Gomorrah brimstone and fire from the Lord out of heaven; “And he overthrew those cities” ( Genesis 19:24–25).

My theme comes in the next verse. Surely, with the Lord’s counsel—“look not behind thee”—ringing clearly in her ears, Lot’s wife, the record says, “looked back,” and she was turned into a pillar of salt (see verse 26). Just what did Lot’s wife do that was so wrong? As a student of history, I have thought about that and offer a partial answer. Apparently, what was wrong with Lot’s wife was that she wasn’t just looking back; in her heart she wanted to go back.

It would appear that even before she was past the city limits, she was already missing what Sodom and Gomorrah had offered her. As Elder Neal A. Maxwell (1926–2004) of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles once said, such people know they should have their primary residence in Zion, but they still hope to keep a summer cottage in Babylon.

1 It is possible that Lot’s wife looked back with resentment toward the Lord for what He was asking her to leave behind. We certainly know that Laman and Lemuel were resentful when Lehi and his family were commanded to leave Jerusalem. So it isn’t just that she looked back; she looked back longingly. In short, her attachment to the past outweighed her confidence in the future.

That, apparently, was at least part of her sin. Faith Points to the Future As a new year begins and we try to benefit from a proper view of what has gone before, I plead with you not to dwell on days now gone nor to yearn vainly for yesterdays, however good those yesterdays may have been.

the best is yet to be sekolah

The past is to be learned from but not lived in. We look back to claim the embers from glowing experiences but not the ashes. And when we have learned what we need to learn and have brought with us the best that we have experienced, then we look ahead and remember that faith is always pointed toward the future.

Faith always has to do with blessings and truths and events that will yet be efficacious in our lives. So a more theological way to talk about Lot’s wife is to say that she did not have faith.

She doubted the Lord’s ability to give her something better than she already had. Apparently, she thought that nothing that lay ahead could possibly be as good as what she was leaving behind.

To yearn to go back to a world that cannot be lived in now, to be perennially dissatisfied with present circumstances and have only dismal views of the future, and to miss the here and now and tomorrow because we are so trapped in the there and then and yesterday are some of the sins of Lot’s wife.

After the Apostle Paul reviewed the privileged and rewarding life of his early years—his birthright, education, and standing in the Jewish community—he says to the Philippians that all of that was “dung” compared to his conversion to Christianity. He says, and I paraphrase, “I have stopped rhapsodizing about ‘the good old days’ and now eagerly look toward the future ‘that I may apprehend that for which Christ apprehended me’” (see Philippians 3:7–12).

Then come these verses: “This one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, “I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus” ( Philippians 3:13–14). No Lot’s wife here.

the best is yet to be sekolah

No looking back at Sodom and Gomorrah here. Paul knows it is out there in the future, up ahead wherever heaven is taking us, that we will win “the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.” Forgive and Forget There is something in many of us that particularly fails to forgive and forget earlier mistakes in life—either our mistakes or the mistakes of others. It is not good. It is not Christian. It stands in terrible opposition to the grandeur and majesty of the Atonement of Christ. To be tied to earlier mistakes is the worst kind of wallowing in the past from which we are called to cease and desist.

I was told once of a young man who for many years was more or less the brunt of every joke in his school. He had some disadvantages, and it was easy for his peers to tease him.

Later in his life he moved away.

the best is yet to be sekolah

He eventually joined the army and had some successful experiences there in getting an education and generally stepping away from his past. Above all, as many in the military do, he discovered the beauty and majesty of the Church and became active and happy in it. Then, after several years, he returned to the town of his youth. Most of his generation had moved on but not all. Apparently, when he the best is yet to be sekolah quite successful and quite reborn, the same old mind-set that had existed before was still there, waiting for his return.

To the people in his hometown, he was still just old “so-and-so”—you remember the guy who had the problem, the idiosyncrasy, the quirky nature, and did such and such. And wasn’t it all just hilarious?

Little by little this man’s Pauline effort to leave that which was behind and grasp the prize that God had laid before him was gradually diminished until he died about the way he had lived in his youth. He came full circle: again inactive and unhappy and the brunt of a new generation of jokes. Yet he had had that one bright, beautiful midlife moment when he had been able to rise above his past and truly see who he was and what he could become.

Too bad, too sad that he was again to be surrounded by a whole batch of Lot’s wives, those who thought his past was more interesting than his future. They managed to rip out of his grasp that for which Christ had grasped him. And he died sad, though through little fault of his own. That also happens in marriages and other relationships.

I can’t tell you the number of couples I have counseled who, when they are deeply hurt or even just deeply stressed, reach farther and farther into the past to find yet a bigger brick to throw through the window “pain” of their marriage.

When something is over and done with, when it has been repented of as fully as it can be repented of, when life has moved on as it should and a lot of other wonderfully good things have happened since then, it is not right to go back and open some ancient wound that the Son of God Himself died to heal.

Let people repent. Let people grow. Believe that people can change and improve. Is that faith? Yes! Is that hope? Yes! Is that charity? Yes! Above all, it is charity, the pure love of Christ. If something is buried in the past, leave it buried. Don’t keep going back with your little sand pail and beach shovel to dig it up, wave it around, and then throw it at someone, saying, “Hey!

Do you remember this?” Splat! Well, guess what? That is probably going to result in some ugly morsel being dug up out of your landfill with the reply, “Yeah, I remember it. Do you remember this?” Splat. And soon enough everyone comes out of that exchange dirty and muddy and unhappy and hurt, when what our Father in Heaven pleads for is cleanliness and kindness and happiness and healing.

Such dwelling on past lives, including past mistakes, is just not right! It is not the gospel of Jesus Christ. In some ways it is worse than Lot’s wife because at least she destroyed only herself. In cases of marriage and family, wards and branches, apartments and neighborhoods, we can end up destroying so many others.

Perhaps at this beginning of a new year there is no greater requirement for us than to do as the Lord Himself said He does: “He who has repented of his sins, the same is forgiven, and I, the Lord, remember them no the best is yet to be sekolah ( D&C 58:42).

The proviso, of course, is that repentance has to be sincere, but when it is and when honest effort is being made to progress, we are guilty of the greater sin if we keep remembering and recalling and rebashing someone with his or her earlier mistakes—and that someone might be ourselves.

We can be so hard on ourselves—often much more so than on others! Now, like the Anti-Nephi-Lehies of the Book of Mormon, bury your weapons of war and leave them buried (see Alma 24).

Forgive and do that which is sometimes harder than to forgive: forget. And when it comes to mind again, forget it again. The Best Is Yet to Be You can remember just enough to avoid repeating the mistake, but then put the rest of it all on the dung heap Paul spoke of to the Philippians. Dismiss the destructive, and keep dismissing it until the beauty of the Atonement of Christ has revealed to you your bright future and the bright future of your family, your friends, and your neighbors.

God doesn’t care nearly as much about where you have been as He does about where you are and, with His help, where you are willing to go. That is the thing Lot’s wife didn’t get—and neither did Laman and Lemuel and a host of others in the scriptures.

This is an important matter to consider at the start of a new year—and every day ought to be the start of a new year and a new life. Such is the wonder of faith, repentance, and the miracle of the gospel of Jesus Christ. The poet Robert Browning wrote: Grow old along with me! The best is yet to be, The last of life, for which the first was made: Our times are in his hand Who saith, “A whole I planned, Youth shows but half; trust God: see all, nor be afraid!” 2 Some of you may wonder: Is there any future for me?

What does a new year or a new semester, a new major or a new romance, a new job or a new home hold for me? Will I be safe?

the best is yet to be sekolah

Will life be sound? Can I trust in the Lord and in the future? Or would it be better to look back, to go back, to stay in the past? To all such of every generation, I call out, “Remember Lot’s wife.” Faith is for the future. Faith builds on the past but never longs to stay there.

the best is yet to be sekolah

Faith trusts that God has great things in store for each of us and that Christ truly is the “high priest of good things to come” ( Hebrews 9:11). Keep your eyes on your dreams, however distant and far away. Live to see the miracles of repentance and forgiveness, of trust and divine love that will transform your life today, tomorrow, and forever. That is a New Year’s resolution I ask you to keep. Notes • See Neal A. Maxwell, A Wonderful Flood of Light (1990), 47.

• Robert Browning, “Rabbi Ben Ezra” (1864), stanza 1. Learning from This Article What lessons from the past can guide you in the future? What blessings do you want to exercise faith to receive?

the best is yet to be sekolah

Faith builds on the past but never longs to stay there. Faith trusts that God has great things in store for each of us. Paul taught, “This one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.” Live to see the miracles of repentance and forgiveness, of trust and divine love that will transform your life today, tomorrow, and forever.

As Lot and his family left Jerusalem, Lot’s wife looked back and was turned to a pillar of salt for disobeying the Lord (see Genesis 19:26).
• Browse the Dictionary: • a • b • c • d • e • f • g • h • i • j • k • l • m • n • o • p • q • r • s • t • u • v • w • x • y • z • 0-9 • Home • Help • About Us • Shop • Advertising Info • Dictionary API • Contact Us • Join MWU • Videos • Word of the Year • Vocabulary Resources • Law Dictionary • Medical Dictionary • Privacy Policy • Terms of Use • Browse the Thesaurus • Browse the Medical Dictionary • Browse the Legal Dictionary © 2022 Merriam-Webster, IncorporatedThe Best Is Yet To Be And for himself, and the new Earth, and all those millions of planets far beyond, he repeated softly once more that the best is yet to be sekolah poem that he alone now, of so many quadrillions, knew: “Grow old along with me!

The best is yet to be, The last of life, for which the first was made…” これは アイザック・アシモフ「宇宙の小石」の最後の一節だ. 先日吉野で開催された 上田信行先生のゼミ Party of the Future に参加してきた.上田先生はご退官のお歳なのだが,歌って踊れる素敵な紳士でいらっしゃる. 歌と踊りって凄いなあ.どんなに良い講演をしても,聴衆は数百人からせいぜい数千人だろう.政治家やノーベル賞受賞者などでようやく一桁上か.学術講演なんて,聴衆が一桁とかよくあるし.そこへ行くと,ミュージシャンの動員力は凄まじい. 動員数が全てではないけれど,多くの人に響くようにアイディアを伝えたいものである. The Best Is Yet To Be!! TEDxKobe, 24 May 2015
The start of a new year is the traditional time to take stock of our lives and see where we are going, measured against the backdrop of where we have been.

I don’t want to talk about New Year’s resolutions, but I do want to talk about the past and the future, with an eye toward any time of transition and change in our lives—and those moments come virtually every day. As a scriptural theme for this discussion, I have chosen Luke 17:32, where the Savior cautions, “Remember Lot’s wife.” What did He mean by such an enigmatic little phrase? To find out, we need to do as He suggested.

Let’s recall who Lot’s wife was. The story, of course, comes to us out of the days of Sodom and Gomorrah, when the Lord, having had as much as He could stand of the worst the best is yet to be sekolah men and women could do, told Lot and his family to flee because those cities were about to be destroyed.

“Escape for thy life,” the Lord said. “ Look not behind thee. . ; escape to the mountain, lest thou be consumed” ( Genesis 19:17; emphasis added). With less than immediate obedience and more than a little negotiation, Lot and his family ultimately did leave town but just in the nick of time.

The scriptures tell us what happened at daybreak the morning following their escape: “The Lord rained upon Sodom and upon Gomorrah brimstone and fire from the Lord out of heaven; “And he overthrew those cities” ( Genesis 19:24–25).

My theme comes in the next verse. Surely, with the Lord’s counsel—“look not behind thee”—ringing clearly in her ears, Lot’s wife, the record says, “looked back,” and she was turned into a pillar of salt (see verse 26). Just what did Lot’s wife do that was so wrong? As a student of history, I have thought about that and offer a partial answer. Apparently, what was wrong with Lot’s wife was that she wasn’t just looking back; in her heart she wanted to go back.

It would appear that even before she was past the city limits, she was already missing what Sodom and Gomorrah had offered her.

the best is yet to be sekolah

As Elder Neal A. Maxwell (1926–2004) of the best is yet to be sekolah Quorum of the Twelve Apostles once said, such people know they should have their primary residence in Zion, but they still hope to keep a summer cottage in Babylon. 1 It is possible that Lot’s wife looked back with resentment toward the Lord for what He was asking her to leave behind. We certainly know that Laman and Lemuel were resentful when Lehi and his family were commanded to leave Jerusalem.

So it isn’t just that she looked back; she looked back longingly. In short, her attachment to the past outweighed her confidence in the future. That, apparently, was at least part of her sin. Faith Points to the Future As a new year begins and we try to benefit from a proper view of what has gone before, I plead with you not to dwell on days now gone nor to yearn vainly for yesterdays, however good those yesterdays may have been. The past is to be learned from but not lived in. We look back to claim the embers from glowing experiences but not the ashes.

And when we have learned what we need to learn and have brought with us the best that we have experienced, then we look ahead and remember that faith is always pointed toward the future. Faith always has to do with blessings and truths and events that will yet be efficacious in our lives. So a more theological way to talk about Lot’s wife is to say that she did not have faith. She doubted the Lord’s ability to give her something better than the best is yet to be sekolah already had.

Apparently, she thought that nothing that lay ahead could possibly be as good as what she was leaving behind. To yearn to go back to a world that cannot be lived in now, to be perennially dissatisfied with present circumstances and have only dismal views of the future, and to miss the here and now and tomorrow because we are so trapped in the there and then and yesterday are some of the sins of Lot’s wife.

After the Apostle Paul reviewed the privileged and rewarding life of his early years—his birthright, education, and standing in the Jewish community—he says to the Philippians that all of that was “dung” compared to his conversion to Christianity. He says, and I paraphrase, “I have stopped rhapsodizing about ‘the good old days’ and now eagerly look toward the future ‘that I may apprehend that for which Christ apprehended me’” (see Philippians 3:7–12). Then come these verses: “This one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, “I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus” ( Philippians 3:13–14).

No Lot’s wife here. No looking back at Sodom and Gomorrah here. Paul knows it is out there in the future, up ahead wherever heaven is taking us, that we will win “the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.” Forgive and Forget There is something in many of us that particularly fails to forgive and forget earlier mistakes in life—either our mistakes or the mistakes of others.

It is not good. It is not Christian. It stands in terrible opposition to the grandeur and majesty of the Atonement of Christ. To be tied to earlier mistakes is the worst kind of wallowing in the past from which we are called to cease and desist.

I was told once of a young man who for many years was more or less the brunt of every joke in his school. He had some disadvantages, and it was easy for his peers to tease him. Later in his life he moved away. He eventually joined the army and had some successful experiences there in getting an education and generally stepping away from his past. Above all, as many in the military do, he discovered the beauty and majesty of the Church and became active and happy in it.

Then, after several years, he returned to the town of his youth.

the best is yet to be sekolah

Most of his generation had moved on but not all. Apparently, when he returned quite successful and quite reborn, the same old mind-set that had existed before was still there, waiting for his return. To the people in his hometown, he was still just old “so-and-so”—you remember the guy who had the problem, the idiosyncrasy, the quirky nature, and did such and such.

And wasn’t it all just hilarious? Little by little this man’s Pauline effort to leave that which was behind and grasp the prize that God had laid before him was gradually diminished until he died about the way he had lived in his youth. He came full circle: again inactive and unhappy and the brunt of a new generation of jokes. Yet he had had that one bright, beautiful midlife moment when he had been able to rise above his past and truly see who he was and what he could become. Too bad, too sad that he was again to be surrounded by a whole batch of Lot’s wives, those who thought his past was more interesting than his future.

They managed to rip out of the best is yet to be sekolah grasp that for which Christ had grasped him.

And he died sad, though through little fault of his own. That also happens in marriages and other relationships. I can’t tell you the number of couples I have counseled who, when they are deeply hurt or even just deeply stressed, reach farther and farther into the past to find yet a bigger brick to throw through the window “pain” of their marriage.

the best is yet to be sekolah

When something is over and done with, when it has been repented of as fully as it can be repented of, when life has moved on as it should and a lot of other the best is yet to be sekolah good things have happened since then, it is not right to go back and open some ancient wound that the Son of God Himself died to heal.

Let people repent. Let people grow. Believe that people can change and improve. Is that faith? Yes! Is that hope? Yes! Is that charity? Yes! Above all, it is charity, the pure love of Christ. If something is buried in the past, leave it buried. Don’t keep going back with your little sand pail and beach shovel to dig it up, wave it around, and then the best is yet to be sekolah it at someone, saying, “Hey!

Do you remember this?” Splat! Well, guess what? That is probably going to result in some ugly morsel being dug up out of your landfill with the reply, “Yeah, I remember it. Do you remember this?” Splat.

And soon enough everyone comes out of that exchange dirty and muddy and unhappy and hurt, when what our Father in Heaven pleads for is cleanliness and kindness and happiness and healing. Such dwelling on past lives, including past mistakes, is just not right! It is not the gospel of Jesus Christ.

In some ways it is worse than Lot’s wife because at least she destroyed only herself. In cases of marriage and family, wards and branches, apartments and neighborhoods, we can end up destroying so many others. Perhaps at this beginning of a new year there is no greater requirement for us than to do as the Lord Himself said He does: “He who has repented of his sins, the same is forgiven, and I, the Lord, remember them no more” ( D&C 58:42).

The proviso, of course, is that repentance has to be sincere, but when it is and when honest effort is being made to progress, we are guilty of the greater sin if we keep remembering and recalling and rebashing someone with his or her earlier mistakes—and that someone might be ourselves.

We can be so hard on ourselves—often much more so than on others! Now, like the Anti-Nephi-Lehies of the Book of Mormon, bury your weapons of war and leave them buried (see Alma 24). Forgive and do that which is sometimes harder than to forgive: forget. And when it comes to mind again, forget it again. The Best Is Yet to Be You can remember just enough to avoid repeating the mistake, but then put the rest of it all on the dung heap Paul spoke of to the Philippians.

Dismiss the destructive, and keep dismissing it until the beauty of the Atonement of Christ has revealed to you your bright future and the bright future of your family, your friends, and your neighbors. God doesn’t care nearly as much about where you have been as He does about where you are and, with His help, where you are willing to go.

That is the thing Lot’s wife didn’t get—and neither did Laman and Lemuel and a host of others in the scriptures. This is an important matter to consider at the start of a new year—and every day ought to be the start of a new year and a new life.

Such is the wonder of faith, repentance, and the miracle of the gospel of Jesus Christ. The poet Robert Browning wrote: Grow old along with me! The best is yet to be, The last of life, for which the first was made: Our times are in his hand Who saith, “A whole I planned, Youth shows but half; trust God: see all, nor be afraid!” 2 Some of you may wonder: Is there any future for me? What does a new year or a new semester, a new major or a new romance, a new job or a new home hold for me?

Will I be safe? Will life be sound? Can I trust in the Lord and in the future? Or would it be better to look back, to go back, to stay in the past? To all such of every generation, I call out, “Remember Lot’s wife.” Faith is for the future. Faith builds on the past but never longs to stay there. Faith trusts that God has great things in store for each of us and that Christ truly is the “high priest of good things to come” ( Hebrews 9:11).

Keep your eyes on your dreams, however distant and far away. Live to see the miracles of repentance and forgiveness, of trust and divine love that will transform your life today, tomorrow, and forever. That is a New Year’s resolution I ask you to keep.

Notes • See Neal A. Maxwell, A Wonderful Flood of Light (1990), 47. • Robert Browning, “Rabbi Ben Ezra” (1864), stanza 1.
The Best Is Yet To Be by Emmanuel Anthony Das Description The best verse hasn’t been rhymed yet, The best house hasn’t been planned, The highest peak hasn’t been claimed, The mightiest rivers aren’t spanned; Don’t worry and fret’ faint-hearted The chances have just begun For the best jobs haven’t been started, The best work hasn’t been done.

“THE BEST IS YET TO BE’ Berton Braley The Author adds: Whatever has happened in your life Whom so ever you may have come across Which ever direction you may have taken Always look ahead, just glance at the back once or twice. or there is still time for you to make it. Always keep in mind and walk. “THE BEST IS YET TO BE’ When a person achieves a certain amount of fame, he thinks that everything is over and that he has come to the end of the road. He must realise that is a lot more to do as ‘THE BEST IS YET TO BE’.

Winning or losing is not in the hands of fate, it is in our own hands. We can win if we think we can, no body can stop us from doing that.

About The Author Emmanuel Anthony Das graduated from Mysore University before taking up a management course at Loyola Institute of Business Administration. He is a powerful trainer, an excellent motivator, creative writer, and an effective counsellor. He has trained and counselled thousands of people, changing their lives in the process.

He is a voracious reader and a bestselling author, and has contributed articles on self-improvement to several leading dailies. Currently he is heading Jade Research Centre, India’s premier training centre, empowering people from all walks of life.

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