Simile meaning

simile meaning

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simile meaning

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simile meaning

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Similes are generally easier to identify than metaphors, but not always. Sometimes a speaker or writer may use the word like or as and not make any comparison. These are not similes. For example if I said, “I like pizza.” I am expressing a preference for pizza not making a comparison.

simile meaning

Comparing two things using the word like or as By the time you finish working through these 100 examples of simile, you should have the hang of it. I have attempted to separate these similes into an easy and hard list. Here is the list of fifty easy similes: Simile Examples for Intermediate Readers • “Food?” Â Chris inquired, popping out of his simile meaning like a toaster strudel.

• Grandpa lounged on the raft in the middle of the pool like an old battleship. • If seen from above the factory, the workers would have looked like clock parts. • The truth was like a bad taste on his tongue.

• The people who still lived in the town were stuck in place like wax statues. • Cassie talked to her son about girls as though she were giving him tax advice. • Alan’s jokes were like flat soda to the children, surprisingly unpleasant. • My mother’s kitchen was like a holy place: you couldn’t wear your shoes, you had to sit there at a certain time, and occasionally we’d pray. • The bottle rolled off the table like a teardrop.

• The handshake felt like warm laundry. • She hung her head like a dying flower. • Arguing with her was like dueling with hand grenades. • The classroom was as quiet as a tongue-tied librarian in a hybrid car. • Janie’s boyfriend appreciated her as an ape might appreciate an algebra book. • Simile meaning clouds were like ice-cream simile meaning in the sky. • The shingles on the shack shook in the storm winds like scared children. • When he reached the top of the hill, he felt as strong as a steel gate.

• When the tree branch broke, Millie fell from the limb like a robin’s egg. • She swam through the waters like she was falling through a warm dream. • They children ran like ripples through water. • Mikhail scattered his pocket change in front of the beggars like crumbs of bread. • Her simile meaning was as soft as a spider web.

• Each dollar bill was a like a magic wand to cast away problems. • The man held the blanket like a memory. • The ice sculptor’s hands fluttered like hummingbird wings. • I’m about as awesome as a flying giraffe.

• You are soft as the nesting dove. • Andre charged down the football field like it was the War of 1812. • The stars looked like stupid little fish. • Her laughter was like a warm blanket or a familiar song. • The river flows like a stream of glass • Blood seeped out of the wound like red teardrops. • Paul carried his science project to school like he was transporting explosive glass. • She looked at me like I was speaking in some strange alien tongue.

• The town square was buzzing like a beehive. • Kelsey followed her dreams simile meaning most kids would follow a big sister. • Kyle looked at the test with a stare as blank as his notebook.

• The robins are as thick today as flakes of snow were yesterday, • Her eyes are like the eyes of statues. • The gray moss drapes us like sages. • The music burst like a bent-up flood. • The curtains stir as with an simile meaning pain.

• But now her hands like moonlight brush the keys with velvet grace. • I flitted like a dizzy moth. • The flowers were as soft as thoughts of budding love. • The gray of the sea, and the gray of the sky, / A glimpse of the moon like a half-closed eye. • Yes, the doors are locked and the ashes are white as the frost. • A mist about your beauty clings like a thin cloud before a star.

• She went like snow in the springtime on a sunny hill. • Then I knew those tiny voices, clear as drops of dew. Yes, please. Simile Examples for Advanced Readers Here are fifty examples of similes for advanced readers. Remember: a simile compares two different things and uses like or as to make the comparison. • I dream of silent verses where the rhyme glides noiseless as an oar. • Though they knew it not, their baby’s cries were lovely as jeweled butterflies.

• He kissed her as though he were trying to win a sword fight. • The paparazzi circled like vultures above simile meaning tottering camel. • She was as distant as a remote tropical island, uncivilized, unspoiled. • Our hearts, though stout and brave, still, like muffled drums, are beating funeral marches to the grave. • He had hidden his wealth, heaped and hoarded and piled on high like sacks of wheat in a granary.

• Pieces of silver and of gold / Into the tinkling strong-box fell / Like pebbles dropped into a well; • The cabin windows have grown blank as eyeballs of the dead. • What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?

• Each face was like the setting sun, / As, broad and red. • Barefooted, ragged, with neglected hair, she was a thin slip of a girl, like a new moon. • A fatal letter wings its way across the sea, like a bird of prey.

simile meaning

• I will sing a slumberous refrain, and you shall murmur like a child appeased. • For she knows me! My heart, clear as a crystal beam / To her alone, ceases to be inscrutable.

• Leaf-strewing gales utter low wails like violins, • He spit out his teeth like stones. simile meaning Talk of your cold: through the parka’s fold it stabbed like a driven nail. • Dawn breaks open like a wound that bleeds afresh. • Like winged stars the fire-flies flash and glance, / Pale in the open moonshine. • The breath of her false mouth was like faint flowers, / Her touch was as electric poison.

• Then, as a hunted deer that could not flee, I turned upon my thoughts and stood at bay, wounded and weak and panting; • There are thick woods where many a fountain, rivulet, and simile meaning are as clear as elemental diamond. • Years heap their withered hours, like leaves, on our decay.

• The ripples wimple on the rills, like sparkling little lasses.

simile meaning

• She was like a modest flower blown in sunny June and warm as sun at noon’s high hour. • And the face of the waters that spread away / Was as gray as the face of the dead.

simile meaning

• As in depths of many seas, simile meaning heart was drowned in memories. • Then like a cold wave on a shore, comes silence and she sings no more. • And shout thy loud battle-cry, cleaving the silence like a sword. • My soul is lost and tossed like a ship unruddered in a shoreless sea. • The clouds like crowds of snowy-hued and white-robed maidens pass • Dreams, like ghosts, must hide away; / ‘Tis the day. • The evening stretches before me like a road. • I would have hours that move like a glitter of dancers.

simile meaning Toby manipulated the people in his life as though they were chess pieces. • And only to think that my soul could not react, but turned on itself like a tortured snake. • There are strange birds like blots against simile meaning sky. • She goes all so softly like a shadow on the hill, a faint wind at twilight. • The horse-chestnuts dropped their buds like tears.

• They walk in awful splendor, regal yet, wearing their crimes like rich and kingly capes. • Death is like moonlight in a lofty wood that pours pale magic through the shadowy leaves. • I was sick of all the sorrow and distress that flourished in the City like foul weeds. • As I read it in the white, morning sunlight, the letters squirmed like snakes.

• Oh, praise me not the silent folk; / To me they only seem / Like leafless, bird-abandoned oak. • The windflowers and the lilies were yellow striped as adder’s tongue. • I have seen old ships sail like swans asleep. • For the world’s events have rumbled on since those days like traffic.

• And dance as simile meaning before the sun, light of foot and unconfined. • The fishes skim like umber shades through the undulating weeds. • Gather up the undiscovered universe like jewels in a jasper cup. Common Simile meaning State Standards Related to Simile Anchor Standards CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.4 – Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.5 – Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. View All CCSS Standards Related to Simile ELA Standards: Literature CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time simile meaning place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning simile meaning tone, including simile meaning with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.) ELA Standards: Language CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.5 – Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances in word meanings.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.5a – Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors (e.g., as pretty as a picture) in context. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.5b – Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5a – Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5b – Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological simile meaning in context. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

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A simile meaning is a figure of speech in which two unrelated things are compared to each other, as in Jose was as clever as a fox. Similes compare two things that seemingly have nothing to do with each other simile meaning actually share a trait or characteristic, at least according to the user of the simile.

In the simile above, Jose is implied to be wily or simile meaning just like a fox that steals chickens from farmers. Similes often use like or as in the comparison, as in Tom’s insults cut like a knife. A simile is very similar to a metaphor, another figure of speech. A metaphor also compares two seemingly unrelated things but, unlike a simile, a metaphor says that something is something else. Often, the difference between a metaphor and simile is a single word.

Her life was like an open book is a simile, while Her life was an open book is a metaphor. Similes and metaphors can be used to accomplish the same thing, and it is ultimately up to the writer or speaker which one they’d prefer to use.

The first records of the word simile come from around 1350. It ultimately comes from Latin, in which it means “an image” or “a likeness.” A simile says that simile meaning things share a likeness or have something in common.

Similes have been used since the beginning of poetry, and even the ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle theorized about them. Some of the most common imagery used in similes include things from nature, such as animals, plants, and the weather. Similes also frequently make comparisons based on sensory experiences, such as smells, tastes, and sounds. Similes are still very common in popular culture today and many writers, musicians, and artists use them.

Here are a few examples from some modern popular songs: • “I’ll worship like a dog at the shrine of your lies” (“Take Me to Church” by Hozier) • “I came in like a wrecking ball” (“Wrecking Ball” by Miley Cyrus) • “And one thought crystallizes like an icy blast” (“Let It Go” by Idina Menzel) This video gives an example of how common similes are in the songs we listen to and movies we watch: Similes are a very popular figure of speech that many people like to use.

I love similes. They're, like, the best. — Josh Gondelman (@joshgondelman) April 17, 2015 Goal of the day: to only use similes that make no sense. It's going to be as funny as corn. — Amy with the big freckles (@notseriouslyamy) January 23, 2015 simile meaning v • t • e Literal and figurative language is a distinction within some fields of language analysis, in particular stylistics, rhetoric, and semantics.

• Literal language uses words exactly according to their conventionally accepted meanings or denotation. • Figurative (or non-literal) language uses words in a way that deviates from their conventionally accepted definitions in order to convey a more complicated meaning or heightened effect. [1] Figurative language is often created by presenting words in such a way that they are equated, compared, or associated with normally unrelated meanings.

Literal usage confers meaning to words, in the sense of the meaning they have by themselves, outside any figure of speech. [2] It maintains a consistent meaning regardless of the context, [3] with the intended meaning corresponding exactly to the meaning of the individual words. [4] Figurative use of language is the use of words or phrases that implies a non-literal meaning which does make sense or that could [also] be true.

[5] Aristotle and later the Roman Quintilian were among the early analysts of rhetoric who expounded on the differences between literal and figurative language. [6] In 1769, Frances Brooke's novel The History of Emily Montague was used in the earliest Oxford English Dictionary citation for the figurative sense of literally; the sentence from the novel used was, "He is a fortunate man to be introduced to such a party of fine women at his arrival; it is literally to feed among the lilies." [7] This citation was also used in the OED's 2011 revision.

[7] Within literary analysis, such terms are still used; but within the fields of cognition and linguistics, the basis for identifying such a distinction is no longer used. [8] This section possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. ( August 2010) ( Learn how and when to remove this template message) Figurative language simile meaning take multiple forms, such as simile or metaphor.

[9] Merriam-Webster's Encyclopedia Of Literature says that figurative language can be classified in five categories: resemblance or relationship, emphasis or understatement, figures of sound, verbal games, and errors.

[10] A simile [11] is a comparison of two simile meaning, indicated by some connective, usually "like", "as", "than", or a verb such as "resembles" to show how they are similar. [12] Example: "His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry./And the beard on his chin was as white as the snow." (emph added)—Clement Clark Moore [13] A metaphor [14] is a figure of speech in which two "essentially unlike things" are shown to have a type of resemblance or create a new image.

[15] The similarities between the objects being compared may be implied rather than directly stated. [15] The literary critic and rhetorician, I.

A. Richards, divides a metaphor into two parts: the vehicle and the tenor. [16] Example: "Fog comes on little cat feet"— Carl Sandburg [17] In this example, “little cat feet” is the vehicle that clarifies the tenor, “fog.” A comparison between the vehicle and tenor (also called the teritium comparitionis) is implicit: fog creeps in silently like a cat. An extended metaphor is a metaphor that is continued simile meaning multiple sentences.

[18] [19] Example: "The sky steps out of her daywear/Slips into her shot-silk evening dress./An entourage of bats whirr and swing at her hem. .She's tried on every item in her wardrobe." Dilys Rose [20] Onomatopoeia is a word designed to be an imitation of a sound. [21] Example: “Bark! Bark!” went the dog as he chased the car that vroomed past.

Personification [22] is the attribution of a personal nature or character to inanimate objects or abstract notions, [23] especially as a rhetorical figure. Example: "Because I could not stop for Death,/He kindly stopped for simile meaning carriage held but just ourselves/And Immortality."— Emily Dickinson.

Dickinson portrays death as a carriage driver. [23] An oxymoron is a figure of speech in which a pair of opposite or contradictory terms is used together for emphasis.

[24] Examples: Organized chaos, Same difference, Bittersweet. A paradox is a statement or proposition which is self-contradictory, unreasonable, or illogical.

[25] Example: This statement is a simile meaning. Hyperbole is a figure of speech which uses an extravagant or exaggerated statement to express strong feelings. [26] Example: They had been walking so long that John thought he might drink the entire lake when they came upon it. Allusion is a reference to a famous character or event. Example: A single step can take simile meaning through the looking glass if you're not careful. An idiom is an expression that has a figurative meaning unrelated to the literal meaning of the simile meaning.

Example: You should keep your eye out for him. A pun is an expression intended for a humorous or rhetorical effect by exploiting different meanings of words. Example: I wondered why the ball was getting bigger. Then it hit me. Standard simile meaning model of simile meaning [ edit ] Prior to the 1980s, the "standard pragmatic" model of comprehension was widely believed.

In that model, it was thought the recipient would first attempt to comprehend the meaning as if literal, but when an appropriate literal inference could not be made, the recipient would shift to look for a figurative interpretation that would allow comprehension. [27] Since then, research has cast doubt on the model. In tests, figurative language was found to be comprehended at the same speed as literal language; and so the premise that simile meaning recipient was first attempting to process a literal meaning and discarding it before attempting to process a figurative meaning appears to be false.

[28] Reddy and contemporary views [ edit ] Beginning with the work of Michael Reddy in his 1979 work " The Conduit Metaphor", many linguists now reject that there is a valid way to distinguish between a "literal" and "figurative" mode of language. [29] See also [ edit ] • ^ " Figure of speech." Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Merriam-Webster, Inc. 2015. • ^ Jaszczolt, Katarzyna M.; Turner, Ken (2003-03-01). Meaning Through Language Contrast. Volume 2. John Benjamins Publishing.

pp. 141–. ISBN 9781588112071. Retrieved 20 December 2012. • ^ Glucksberg, Sam (2001-07-26). Understanding Figurative Language:From Metaphor to Idioms: From Metaphor to Idioms. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780195111095. Retrieved 20 December 2012. • ^ Harley, Trevor A. (2001). The Psychology of Language: From Data to Theory. Taylor & Francis. pp. 293–. ISBN 978-0-863-77867-4. Retrieved 20 December 2012. • ^ Montgomery, Mar; Durant, Alan; Fabb, Simile meaning Tom Furniss; Sara Mills (2007).

Ways of Reading: Advanced Reading Skills for Students of English Literature. Taylor & Francis. pp. 117–. ISBN 9780415346337. Retrieved 23 December 2012. • ^ M.H. Abrams; Geoffrey Harpham (2011). A Glossary of Literary Terms (10 ed.). Cengage Learning. ISBN 9780495898023. • ^ a b "Language Log » Frances Brooke, destroyer of English (Not literally)". • ^ Barber, Alex; Stainton, Robert J (2009-11-20). Concise Encyclopedia of Philosophy of Language and Linguistics.

Elsevier. pp.

simile meaning

230–. ISBN 9780080965000. Retrieved 23 December 2012. • ^ Montgomery, Martin; Durant, Alan; Fabb, Nigel; Tom Furniss; Sara Mills (2007-01-09). Ways of Reading: Advanced Reading Skills for Students of English Literature.

Routledge. pp. 117–. ISBN 9780203597118. Retrieved 3 April 2013. • ^ Merriam-Webster, inc. (1995). Merriam-Webster's Encyclopedia Of Literature. Merriam-Webster. p. 415. ISBN 9780877790426. Retrieved 23 April 2013. • ^ Origin: 1350–1400; Middle English < Latin: image, likeness, comparison, noun use of neuter of similis similar.

"Simile". simile, n. Oxford Simile meaning Dictionary. • ^ Kennedy, X. J., and Dana Gioia. An Introduction To Poetry. 13th ed. Longman Pub Group, 2007. Pg 594. • ^ Terban, Marvin; joi, Giulio Maestro (1993). It Figures!: Fun Figures of Speech. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

pp. 12–. ISBN 9780395665916. Retrieved 23 December 2012. • ^ Origin: 1525–35; < Latin metaphora < Greek metaphorá a transfer, akin to metaphérein to transfer. See meta- -phore "Metaphor". metaphor, n. Oxford English Dictionary.

• ^ a b Miller, Carol Rawlings (2001-03-01). Irresistible Shakespeare: 6 Sensational Scenes from Favorite Plays and Dozens of Fun Ideas That Introduce Students to the Wonderful Works of Shakespeare. Scholastic Inc. pp. 25–. ISBN 9780439098441. Retrieved 23 December 2012. • ^ I. A. Richards, The Philosophy of Rhetoric (New York: Oxford University Press, simile meaning, 119-27. • ^ Fandel, Jennifer (2005-07-30).

simile meaning

Metaphors, Similes, And Other Word Pictures. The Creative Company. pp. 30–. ISBN 9781583413401. Retrieved 3 April 2013. • ^ "Extended Metaphor". Dictionary.com. • ^ Oliver, Mary (1994). Poetry Handbook. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. pp. 103–. ISBN 9780156724005. Retrieved 6 March 2013. • ^ Liddell, Gordon F.; Gifford, Anne (2001-07-26). New Scottish poetry. Heinemann. pp. 131–. ISBN 9780435150983.

Retrieved 3 April 2013. • ^ Origin: 1570–80; < Late Latin < Greek onomatopoiía making of words = onomato- (combining form of ónoma name) + poi- (stem of poieîn to make; see poet) + -ia -ia "Onomatopoeia".

onomatopoeia, n. Oxford English Dictionary. • ^ Origin: 1745–55; personi(fy) + -fication "Personification". personification, n. Oxford English Dictionary. • ^ a b Moustaki, Nikki (2001-04-01). The Complete Idiot's Guide to Writing Poetry. Penguin. pp. 146–. ISBN 9781440695636. Retrieved 23 December 2012. • ^ Origin: < post-classical Latin oxymoron, figure of speech in which a pair of opposed or markedly contradictory terms are placed in conjunction for emphasis (5th cent.; also oxymorum) < ancient Greek ὀξυ-oxy- comb.

form1+ μωρόςdull, stupid, foolish (see moron n.2). "Oxymoron". Oxford English Dictionary. • ^ Origin: < Middle French, French paradoxe (1495 as noun; 1372–4 in plural paradoxesas the title of a work by Cicero; paradoxon simile meaning philosophical paradox in post-classical Latin also a figure of speech < ancient Greek παράδοξον, especially in plural παράδοξαStoical paradoxes, use as noun of neuter singular of παράδοξος (adjective) contrary to received opinion or expectation < παρα-para- prefix1+ δόξαopinion (see doxology n.), after ancient Greek παρὰ δόξανcontrary to expectation "Paradox".

paradox, n. Oxford English Dictionary. • ^ Origin: < Greek ὑπερβολήexcess (compare hyperbola n.), exaggeration; the latter sense is first found in Isocrates and Aristotle. Compare French hyperbole(earlier yperbole). "Hyperbole".

hyperbol e, n. Oxford English Dictionary. • ^ Katz, Albert N. (1998). Figurative Language and Thought. Oxford University Press. pp. 166–. ISBN 9780195109634. Retrieved 20 December 2012. • ^ Eysenck, Michael William; Keane, Mark T. (2005).

Cognitive Psychology: A Student's Handbook. Taylor & Francis. pp. 369–. ISBN 9781841693590. Retrieved 20 December 2012. • ^ Ortony, Andrew (1993-11-26). Metaphor and Thought. Cambridge University Press. pp. 204–. ISBN 9780521405614.

Retrieved 20 December 2012. External links [ edit ] • The Word We Love To Hate. Literally. from Slate Magazine • Figures of Speech from Silva Rhetoricae Edit links • This page was last edited on 11 February 2022, at 07:54 (UTC). • Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License 3.0 ; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use simile meaning Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

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For example, you win 10 million dollars in a lottery. When you tell a news reporter “ I am delighted,” you are making an understatement. Similarly, suppose a team loses to its opponent 50 to 0 in a soccer match, and the captain of the team says in a post-match ceremony, “We did not do well,” it is an understatement because he is trying to decrease the intensity of the loss.

An understatement usually has an ironic effect, as an equally intense response is expected in severe situations, but the statement in response is the opposite of what was expected. For instance, your friend returns your new coat with a large wine stain on the front of it. In response, you make an understatement, “It doesn’t look too bad.” Therefore, simile meaning understatement is opposite to another figure of speech, hyperbole, which is an overstatement.

Common Understatement Examples Let us try to understand understatement better with the help of some common examples of understatement used in daily conversations: • “Deserts are sometimes hot, dry, and sandy.” – Describing deserts of the world.• “He is not too thin.” – Describing an obese person.• “It rained a bit more than usual.” – Describing an area being flooded by heavy rainfall.• “It was O.K.” – Said by the student who got the highest score on the test.• “It is a bit nippy today.” – Describing the temperature, which is 5 degrees below freezing.

Difference between Ironic and Non-Ironic Understatement An ironic understatement is a statement whose very objective is a mockery. It is also called comedic understatement and comprises verbal irony. In other words, the literal meaning is not what the speaker speaks but what he intends. In non-ironic understatement, the literal meanings are a fact that is being presented without any pretensions. Differences between Understatement and Hyperbole Although both hyperbole and understatement appear the same, they have a little difference.

Hyperbole is an exaggeration that is always greater than the actual while an understatement is always lesser simile meaning the actual. Therefore, despite having a similarity in their functions, both are different from each other where one belittles and the other makes bigger.

Difference between Understatement and Anticlimax There is a lot of difference between an understatement and an anti- climax.

Whereas an understatement means to belittle things with irony or without irony, an anti-climax means to bring down expectations after heightening them to a point that unexpected bringing down causes disappointment. Difference between Understatement and Litotes • She gained a little weight. It’s not a big deal jumping from Size 8 to 16.• They are doing a bit of their simile meaning these days and of course, there’ll be a lot of noise.• Joe’s hair fall has led to his downfall.• It is not that I’m not waking up in the mornings, it is that my mom is not making me sit down.• 2020 was not the best of the times and also not the worst of the times.

Examples of Understatement in Literature Example #1: Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger In Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye, Holden Caulfield says: “I have to have this operation. It isn’t very serious. I have this tiny little tumor on the brain.” Having a tumor in the brain is a serious issue, which has been understated in this excerpt.

Example #2: Emperor Mage by Tamora Pierce In Emperor Mage, a fantasy novel by Tamora Pierce, Daine states (as if she has done nothing wrong): “I thought they’d killed you. I lost my temper.” This is an understatement that Daine makes, after raising an army simile meaning dinosaur skeletons to destroy the king, and later, she destroys the imperial palace in order to avenge the death of her teacher. Example #3: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain [Aunt Sally] “Good gracious, anybody hurt?” [Huck] “No’m.

Killed a nigger.” This excerpt from Mark Twain’s famous work provides one of the great understatement examples found in Twain’s simile meaning pieces. Huck’s response, “No’m. Killed a nigger” exposes the thinking simile meaning the people of the time, who did not consider black men humans. Killing a black man was not considered something serious.

Example #4: Night’s Dawn Trilogy by Peter F. Hamilton Look at the understatement in Night’s Dawn Trilogy written by Peter F. Hamilton: “I’ve always been a massive admirer of the Edenist ability to understate.

But I think defining simile meaning chunk of simile meaning fifteen kilometers across that suddenly takes flight and wanders off into another dimension as a little problem is possibly the best example yet.” Example #5: The Silver Chain by Primula Bond Another example of understatement comes from Primula Bond’s novel The Silver Chain: “And you, who have told me a hundred times how deeply you pitied me for the sorceries by which I was bound, will doubtless hear with joy that they are now ended forever.

There was, it seems, some small error in your Ladyship’s way of treating them.” The reference of “some small error” is an understatement as the error which ends somebody’s power is not small at all. Example #6: Consider Phlebas by Iain Banks In another fantasy novel, Consider Phlebas, an understatement was made about a war that lasted for 48 simile meaning, and took the lives of more than 851 billion beings. “A small, short war that rarely extended throughout more than .02% of the galaxy and .01% by stellar population … the galaxy’s elder civilisations rate the Idiran-Culture war as … one of those singularly interesting Events they see so rarely these days.” Function of Understatement An understatement is a tool that helps to develop other figures of speech, such as irony and sarcasm, by deliberately decreasing the severity of a situation, simile meaning an intense response is expected by the listeners or the readers.

Synonyms of Understatement As a literary term, no other word can be used as its substitute. However, a few following words are its distant synonyms such as euphemism, understatement, minimization, trivialization, or sometimes subtlety, litotes, and meiosis. View Full List of Literary Devices • Ad Hominem• Adage• Allegory• Alliteration• Allusion• Ambiguity• Anachronism• Anagram• Analogy• Anapest• Anaphora• Anecdote• Antagonist• Antecedent• Antimetabole• Antithesis• Aphorism• Aposiopesis• Apostrophe• Archaism• Archetype• Argument• Assonance• Biography• Cacophony• Cadence• Caricature• Catharsis• Characterization• Cliché• Climax• Colloquialism• Comparison• Conflict• Connotation• Consonance• Denotation• Deus Ex Machina• Dialect• Dialogue• Diction• Didacticism• Discourse• Doppelganger• Double Entendre• Ellipsis• Epiphany• Epitaph• Essay• Ethos• Eulogy• Euphemism• Evidence• Exposition• Fable• Fallacy• Flash Forward• Foil• Foreshadowing• Foreword• Genre• Haiku• Half Rhyme• Homage• Hubris• Hyperbaton• Hyperbole• Idiom• Imagery• Induction• Inference• Innuendo• Internal Simile meaning Irony• Jargon• Juxtaposition• Limerick• Line Break• Logos• Meiosis• Memoir• Metaphor• Meter• Montage• Mood• Motif• Motto• Narrative• Nemesis• Non Sequitur• Ode• Onomatopoeia• Oxymoron• Palindrome• Parable• Paradox• Parallelism• Parataxis• Parody• Pathetic Fallacy• Pathos• Pentameter• Persona• Personification• Plot• Plot Twist• Poem• Poetic Justice• Point of View• Portmanteau• Propaganda• Prose• Protagonist• Pun• Red Herring• Repetition• Rhetoric• Rhyme• Rhythm• Sarcasm• Satire• Simile• Soliloquy• Sonnet• Style• Subtext• Superlative• Syllogism• Symbolism• Synecdoche• Synesthesia• Synonym• Syntax• Tautology• Theme• Thesis• Tone• Tragedy• Tragicomedy• Tragic Flaw• Transition• Utopia• Verisimilitude report this ad
Spondee is a poetic foot that has two syllables, which are consecutively stressed.

For example: “ White founts falling in the Courts of the sun” ( Lepanto, by G. K. Chesterton) 4. Dactyl (/ x x) Dactyl is made up of three syllables. The first syllable is stressed, and the remaining two syllables are not stressed, such as in the word “ marvelous.” For example: “This is the forest primeval.

The murmuring pines and the hemlocks,” ( Evangeline, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow) The words “primeval” and “murmuring” show dactyls in this line. 5. Anapest (x x /) Anapests are total opposites of dactyls. They have three syllables; where the first two syllables are not stressed, and the last syllable is stressed.

For example: ” ‘Twas the night before Christ mas, and all through the house,” (‘Twas the Night Before Christmas, by Clement Clarke Moore) Short Examples of Rhythm in Sentences • Do it as you planned, I’d choose to stay at home.• Who is the woman on the phone? You’ll have to call her a gain.• Tell them why you don’t a gree, Do re mem• I will find the keys for you, and you must find a place to park the car.• Whose goods are these, I don’t know.

If I take, my life is at stake, I know though.• Give him a burger with an egg.• She’d ra ther go to school.• Bill acts brilli antly, hence he wants to stay at Holly• With us they will see they do not need• Never stop do ing best till you reach the top if you want to find hope.• A mouse is hiding in their house.• The goat is eating in the boat.• She made a star on her simile meaning This rat is fat.• Nina liked the ball in a mall.• How do you pray looking at the tray? What is the Purpose of Rhythm in Poetry?

As the beat simile meaning pace of the poem, rhythm shows the regular occurrence of stressed simile meaning unstressed syllables. The purpose is to create a metrical pattern that could fit the musical beats. The music also helps readers understand the major themes and messages of the poem.

Difference Between Rhythm and Meter Rhythm is the pattern of stresses that occurs at a regular pace.

simile meaning

It is an overall rhythm that runs throughout the poem. However, simile meaning a meter, it means the specific pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in a poem. The minor difference is that whereas a meter is a specific pattern, simile meaning is a general poetic rhythm that runs in almost all the poems, encompassing all the metrical patterns.

Examples of Rhythm in Literature Example #1: Romeo Juliet by William Shakespeare “Two households, both a like in dignity, In fair Ve rona, where we lay our scene, From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life;” There are ten syllables in iamb pentameter, where the second syllable is accented or stressed.

In the above lines the stressed syllables are expressed in bold. Example #2: Paradise Lost by John Milton “And Life—blood streaming fresh; wide was the wound.” Milton has used spondee in this entire epic poem. The spondaic meter is explicitly visible in the words “wide was.” However, simile meaning remaining line is iambic pentameter. Example #3: Macbeth by William Shakespeare “DOU-ble, / DOU-ble / TOIL and / TROU-ble; FI-re / BURN, and / CAL-dron / BUB-ble.” These two lines are taken from Shakespeare’s Macbeth.

The chorus of the witches’ spell shows a perfect example of trochees. Stressed pattern is shown in capitals. Example #4: Song by Sir John Suckling “ Why so pale and wan, fond Lover? Prithee why so pale? Will, when looking well can’t move her, Looking ill pre vail? Prithee why so pale?” Sir John has written this poem in trochaic meter.

Here, the stressed or accented syllables of the trochaic pattern are shown in bold-face type. This poem gives a strong rhythmical effect. Example #5: Tyger by William Blake “ Tyger! Tyger! burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

Trochees are perfectly used in this poem by William Blake. Here, the first syllables of the words “ tyger,” “ burning,” and “ forests” are stressed; however the second syllables are unstressed. Example #6: The Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred Lord Tennyson “ Half a League, Half a League” This single line is an example of a dactylic pattern, as one stressed syllable is followed by two unstressed syllables, the stressed syllables noted in bold above.

Example #7: Will There Really Be a Morning? by Emily Dickinson “ Will there really be a morning? Is there such a thing as day? Could I see it from the mountains If I were as tall as they?

Has it feet like water-lilies? Has it feathers like a bird? Is it brought from famous countries.” In this poem, the speaker is feeling dejected, wondering if there could be hope and morning again. The poet has used trochees, giving a strong rhythm to the poem. Notice in this first stanza, that the accented syllables are emphasized. See that word “I” is unaccented or unstressed with different feet as underlined. Example #8: My Papa’s Waltz by Theodore Roethke “The whiskey on your breath Could make a small boy dizzy… We romped un til the pans Slid from the k itchen shelf; My mother’s counte nance Could not un frown it self.” The rhyme scheme of this poem is ABAB, which means the first and the third lines rhyme, as do the second and the fourth lines.

Roethke has used three iambs, or three beats per line, giving the poem regular simile meaning flow. Example #9: By the North Sea by A. C. Swinburne “And his hand is not weary of simile meaning, And the thirst of her heart is not fed And the hunger that moans in her passion, And the rage in her hunger that roars, As a wolf’s that the winter lays lash on… As the waves of the numberless waters That the wind cannot number who guides Are the sons of the shore and the daughters.” This poet simile meaning used simile meaning (two unstressed syllables followed by one stressed syllable) in this example.

simile meaning

It adds to the rhythm, yet it carries a subdued effect. Example #10: The Courage That My Mother Had by Edna St. Vincent Millay “Oh, if ins tead she’d left to me The thing she took in to the grave! That courage like a rock, which she Has no more need of, and I have.” These lines follow a pattern of four iambs in each line. This rhythm is catchy because the poet first sets the rhythm, and then breaks it in the last few syllables. It makes the reading smooth and melodious. Function of Rhythm Rhythm in writing acts as beat does in music.

The use of rhythm in poetry arises from the need to express some words more strongly than others. They might be stressed for a longer period of time. Hence, the repeated use of rhythmical patterns of such accents produces the rhythmical effects, which sound pleasant to the mind as well as to the soul.

In a speech, rhythm is used unconsciously to create identifiable patterns. Moreover, rhythm captivates the audience and readers alike by giving musical effect to a speech or a literary piece. Synonyms of Rhythm The following words are distant synonyms and come close to Rhythm in meaning.

These are tempo, regular features, beat, cadence, flow, pace, time, pulse, throb, and swing. View Full List of Literary Devices • Ad Hominem• Adage• Allegory• Alliteration• Allusion• Ambiguity• Anachronism• Anagram• Analogy• Anapest• Anaphora• Anecdote• Antagonist• Antecedent• Antimetabole• Simile meaning Aphorism• Aposiopesis• Apostrophe• Archaism• Archetype• Argument• Assonance• Biography• Cacophony• Cadence• Caricature• Catharsis• Characterization• Cliché• Climax• Colloquialism• Comparison• Conflict• Connotation• Consonance• Denotation• Deus Ex Machina• Dialect• Dialogue• Diction• Didacticism• Discourse• Doppelganger• Double Entendre• Ellipsis• Epiphany• Epitaph• Essay• Ethos• Eulogy• Euphemism• Evidence• Simile meaning Fable• Fallacy• Flash Forward• Foil• Foreshadowing• Foreword• Genre• Haiku• Simile meaning Rhyme• Homage• Hubris• Hyperbaton• Hyperbole• Idiom• Imagery• Induction• Inference• Innuendo• Internal Rhyme• Irony• Jargon• Juxtaposition• Limerick• Line Break• Logos• Meiosis• Memoir• Metaphor• Meter• Montage• Mood• Motif• Motto• Narrative• Nemesis• Non Sequitur• Ode• Onomatopoeia• Oxymoron• Palindrome• Parable• Paradox• Parallelism• Parataxis• Parody• Pathetic Fallacy• Pathos• Pentameter• Persona• Personification• Plot• Plot Twist• Poem• Poetic Justice• Point of View• Portmanteau• Propaganda• Prose• Protagonist• Pun• Red Herring• Repetition• Rhetoric• Rhyme• Rhythm• Sarcasm• Satire• Simile• Soliloquy• Sonnet• Style• Subtext• Superlative• Syllogism• Symbolism• Synecdoche• Synesthesia• Synonym• Syntax• Tautology• Theme• Thesis• Tone• Tragedy• Tragicomedy• Tragic Flaw• Transition• Utopia• Verisimilitude report this ad

Figures of speech: Simile and Metaphor definition and example in hindi




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